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Black_Moons
02-26-2011, 08:03 PM
Hi, Im wondering if my phase II 3" boring head scale is backwards.

Its designed with the further out hole on the opposite side of the scale. So I assume you generaly point the bit outwards towards the outside hole.
The thing is, To make holes 'bigger' the scale numbers go down! Im rotating the adjusting knob clockwise, And the adjusting screw is threading in.. I took it apart and theres no way to flip it around... So is the scale itself printed backwards from what it should be?

Making a hole bigger via reducing the scale reading seems very counterintuitive, Even if its what I do on my lathe with boring bars.

So what way to boring heads usally work? Or is it a mixup of both ways?

MichaelP
02-26-2011, 09:01 PM
Sorry for a stupid question, but are you sure you use a correct hole for your boring bar?

J.Ramsey
02-26-2011, 09:10 PM
Pretty simple IMO righ -y tight-y lefty lous-y .

Carld
02-26-2011, 09:16 PM
I have a BridgePort boring head and it has a hole in the center and a hole opposite the adjusting screw with the dial. You can put the boring bar cutting edge facing forward or to the back, away from the dial. You just have to remember which way to turn the dial. Depending on which way the cutter is facing you either advance the numbers or reduce the numbers to increase the bore size.

The position of the holes makes it so you can cover a wide range of bore sizes and change holes to go to a larger bore as you start from a small hole to the biggest hole it will make. When you get to the largest size with the bar sticking out the bottom then you can start using a hole in the front or rear of the boring head. Bigger is better they say.

Sometimes it's confusing but you just have to be smarter than the boring head and stay awake.

Jim Hubbell
02-26-2011, 10:10 PM
My APT head pushes the cutting tool carrier away from the dial as the numbers increase. And the bore gets larger.

TGTool
02-26-2011, 10:27 PM
My boring head has two sets of numbers so I can either count up for size or count down to a finished diameter. But then I put them there myself. :rolleyes:

Black_Moons
02-26-2011, 11:07 PM
My boring head has two sets of numbers so I can either count up for size or count down to a finished diameter. But then I put them there myself. :rolleyes:

Mmmm, I would sure love to put a bigger custom dial on this thing..

Toolguy
02-26-2011, 11:27 PM
I have 4 boring heads. All of them and all the ones I have used over the years have been the same. With the cutting edge pointing away from the dial, they turn clockwise and count up to make the hole bigger.

mechanicalmagic
02-26-2011, 11:34 PM
All of them and all the ones I have used over the years have been the same. With the cutting edge pointing away from the dial, they turn clockwise and count up to make the hole bigger.

Ditto. Same for me.

tdmidget
02-27-2011, 01:48 AM
You say the adjusting screw "is threading in". The screw does not move, the slide does. If it appears to be "threading in" the the slide is retracting. This would match your graduation on the screw. If you have a left hand screw, on the other hand (couldn't pass that up) the it will appear to be "threading out" when turned clockwise. But it really does not matter because to set a boring head properly you should put an indicator against it and set by that.

doctor demo
02-27-2011, 01:59 AM
The no name bar I have has 3 vertical holes and one horizontal hole so ya can crank the dial up or down to make the hole bigger depending on mood and cutting tool placement.

Steve:)

Lodsb
02-27-2011, 10:46 AM
The ones from CDCO are backwards too. I complained. :eek:
It's distracting; the plan is to remove the numbers, and *maybe* stamp some proper ones.

Carld
02-27-2011, 11:01 AM
I suppose since there are marks on the dial or the face where the dial turns you could put marks going in the opposite direction so your advancing in the numbers which ever direction your turning the dial.

I don't see a problem because you have the same issue with a lathe dial or a mill dial. If your going in one direction the numbers increase but if you have to turn the dial in the opposite direction and the numbers descend you have to be awake and aware of what your doing.

For instance, if your turning the outside of a shaft you will be advancing on the crossfeed dial. If your boring in a hole you have to back the tool away from center and the dial numbers are descending so you have to think about what your doing.

To be a machinist you have to be smarter than the machine. If you can't do that then take up another hobby or line of work, it's just that simple.

Take up wood work, you can use a tape measure and you don't have dials on a wood lathe to deal with.

Lodsb
02-27-2011, 11:28 AM
For putting the metal back on? A boring head usually bores.

bborr01
02-27-2011, 11:48 AM
BM,

It shouldn't matter what direction the bar moves. Ten thousanths on the dial is the same thing in either direction.

Just turn the dial in the direction that you need and count the graduations.

Brian

edit: Carld pretty much covered it in a previous post too.

metalmagpie
02-27-2011, 12:02 PM
I learned this the hard way. One way you thread a boring head, if you thread it too far the bottom comes off. The other way, it hits a stop safely. Guess which is the right way to turn it?

The big question is why aren't there any clearly-written instructions?

Highpower
02-27-2011, 12:05 PM
Black_Moons, you just need the proper bore gauge to go along with your boring head. I just happen to know where one is available... :p

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showpost.php?p=638799&postcount=7

Carld
02-27-2011, 08:37 PM
Gee whiz fellows, it's a simple tool and the dial tells you how much you moved the cutter whether it's to you or away from you depending on which way the cutting edge is pointed.

The reason there are no instructions included is because it's so simple it don't need instructions. If you can figure out how to put a boring bar into the hole, clamp it tight, loosen the screws to move the cutter head and turn the dial your using it.

I don't think anyone that can operate a lathe or a mill would or should have any problems figuring out how to use a boring head.