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Dunc
03-05-2011, 12:20 PM
Hoping someone could clarify the content of Filing Parallel by James McKnight in HSM, Vol 19 #4, July-Aug 2000. Is this a construction article for a filing machine?

If it is, has anyone built it and has some thoughts/tips to pass along?

PS. Just to be up-front, this is not a subtle plea for a copy. If it looks promising I would order the issue/article from Village Press or HSM as necessary.

Thanks

Weston Bye
03-05-2011, 02:34 PM
The device is basically a hand vise or a couple of parallel details on alignment pins, closed and clamped with a screw to provide a broad flat surface with sharp edges to support a thin detail. You could accomplish the same thing with a bench vise and a couple of square edged blocks of steel, but would have to fuss about getting the top edges parallel.

From the article:

Very seldom do you require a filing parallel - but when you do, this tool works very well. It can be used not only to file a sheet metal part to a given layout line but can also be utilized to bend small segments. I managed to produce numerous small, intricate parts made from sheet brass, aluminum, copper and steel during my time as an insturment maker...

Just a little over 2 pages in length. Text, photos and drawings.

John Stevenson
03-05-2011, 02:59 PM
but can also be utilized to bend small segments. I managed to produce numerous small, intricate parts made from sheet brass, aluminum, copper and steel during my time as an insturment maker...

True story.
My sheet metals skills are akin to kicking a bean can down the motorway for 4 junctions, in fact rethinking this make it 6 junctions.

However I have to make brush boxes up for DC motors after they have caught fire and melted from time to time. Fiddly little things that need absolute square corners and usually means a delve into the scrapbinium box for find off cuts of rectangular and square steel to use as packing to belt this innocent piece of brass sheet around.

What's really needed is a set you can assemble just like gauge blocks, :cool: !

Now I have a set of gauge blocks, carbide lab grade that came as a job lot of stuff but far too good to use for this - BUT - I also have literally 1/2 a shoe box of loose gauge blocks that have been used for packing at a company, they even have packing etched on them.

So jobs a good un, make the sizes up and bash the holder to shape.

So this day I have a set of 4 to do when this Herbert rings up to ask if he can bring a bit round for welding. Now said Herbert is dead anally retentive and the sort that has to work to microns when putting a shelf up, so me thinking me can have a chuckle here.

Got the three blocks I needed and swapped them for the carbide ones in the set, when said Herbert is coming down the drive start to do these brush boxes. He walks in and watches as I get the slips, and proceed the really hammer the boxes round them and swing on the vise handle.

After a couple of minutes he asks "Are those slip gauges ?"

"Yup"

"You shouldn't use slip gauges like that"

"Why not, these brush boxes have to be dead on, no tolerances at all, really dead precise"

You could see from his attitude he didn't know what to believe, because he had no true skills or grounding in engineering. Went away with a worried look. :D :)

Dunc
03-06-2011, 06:58 AM
Info appreciated. Was hoping for a die filer.

fciron
03-06-2011, 08:00 AM
tsk, tsk Sir John,

You may laugh today, but now your rube is going to insist all his bending be done over gage blocks too, ;)