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mechtech32
03-07-2011, 12:45 AM
Hi all this is my first thread. But I've been sucking up all the info and entertainment around here for awhile now. I finally broke down and bought a small 9x20 lathe under the shopfox name, should be delivered around wednesday. I wish i had room for bigger but i don't so it will do.... Any way i am looking to buy a QC tool post for it and i notice that there are two styles the piston type and the wedge type. all the lathes i have used so far have had the wedge type. anyone have any experience or reservations about the piston type?
thanks Allan

macona
03-07-2011, 12:48 AM
Hi all this is my first thread. But I've been sucking up all the info and entertainment around here for awhile now. I finally broke down and bought a small 9x20 lathe under the shopfox name, should be delivered around wednesday. I wish i had room for bigger but i don't so it will do.... Any way i am looking to buy a QC tool post for it and i notice that there are two styles the piston type and the wedge type. all the lathes i have used so far have had the wedge type. anyone have any experience or reservations about the piston type?
thanks Allan

First, my condolences on the 9x20.

Second, I have had and used both kinds, I like the wedge holders better but either one will be fine on that machine. But now I use the multifix tool post and I dont use the others any more at home.

winchman
03-07-2011, 01:44 AM
I have used both, and I prefer the piston type.

The handle on the wedge-type QCTP at the school will jiggle around after it's tightened, and I find that very distracting. It never happens with the piston-types.

The piston type can be tightened by turning the handle either direction, and that sometimes helps get the handle out of the way. Of course, the downside of that feature is that it's easy to forget which way you tightened it.

SGW
03-07-2011, 08:55 AM
IN THEORY, the wedge style is supposed to be more repeatable. In practice, for home shop use, I doubt that it matters at all.

Carld
03-07-2011, 09:09 AM
While I prefer the wedge style unless your doing a lot of heavy cutting you won't find it matters. I just don't feel comfortable with the piston style but for home use it will work.

EDIT: one very important thing is to ALWAYS blow the tool post and holder off before you remove the holder, the tool post after you remove the holder and the holder your getting ready to put on the tool post. You don't want chips anywhere in the wedge or piston or dovetails of the tool post and holder.

Bob Fisher
03-07-2011, 11:12 AM
A 9x20 is WAY better than no lathe at all. With a few mods, see the 9x20 users group, such as a heavier compound support, cam locking tailstock,and a reverse tumbler you can make it a decent little machine. I have had an older Jet for a long time , and done some very nice projects. You just have to be aware of the machines limitations. I have aquired a 1944 Logan since, but kept the Jet for smaller things.Bob Fisher

camdigger
03-07-2011, 06:08 PM
A 9x20 is WAY better than no lathe at all. With a few mods, see the 9x20 users group, such as a heavier compound support, cam locking tailstock,and a reverse tumbler you can make it a decent little machine. I have had an older Jet for a long time , and done some very nice projects. You just have to be aware of the machines limitations. I have aquired a 1944 Logan since, but kept the Jet for smaller things.Bob Fisher

Everyone has to start somewhere. I started with a Taig. Moved up a bit since. First an antique line shaft lathe shared with my father, then a WWII era lathe, then a new from the factory Tiawanese 1440. I still have the Taig, and in fact the last of the 3 lathes in my shop now that ran was the Taig. My 15 year old daughter modified some rivets for a project with it.

Each of the 3 machines iin my shop has something it excells in, at least in my opinion.

mechtech32
03-07-2011, 08:06 PM
thanks for all the good advice I think i will give the piston style a try since it costs less than the wedge. Bob you nailed it something is better than nothing. i spent hours researching all the different websites on the 9x20 before i made the decision to buy one, so at least i know what I'm getting in to and welcome it.

PixMan
03-07-2011, 09:23 PM
I have a Dorian CA size post (WAY too big for a 9x20) and it's kind of a hybrid. The "piston" pushes against one side of the dovetail, so I guess it would be more like a wedge-type than piston.

Congrats on the lathe. Space is always a consideration, and you gotta do what you gotta do. Fair warning, it's going to whet your appetite for turning and you'll soon be scheming on how to get bigger.better.faster.

When I first got into photography, I tried using the kitchen in my apartment as a darkroom. Being on a second floor of an old house, I learned about the vibration and small, lightweight enlargers. The next darkroom had a 4x5 enlarger, and the room was built on a concrete floor of a basement. The third darkroom was bigger, so I could have TWO enlargers and an 8-foot sink.

I never forgot how I started, and why bigger is better....when you are able to do it and have the space. ;)

Tony Ennis
03-07-2011, 09:43 PM
I have a piston AXA on my 12" Craftsman. I like using it. An AXA will fit on yours too.

wooleybooger
03-07-2011, 10:51 PM
like camdigger says-you have to start somewhere.if id started with a 9x20 i wouldnt have my unimat or 618 craftsman. i have a piston type bxa on my rockwell 14x40 and convinced a buddy to put one on his 14x40 cadillac. they work very well for us. we both also kept a rocker toolpost and toolholders for the occasional job the bulkier QCTP cant quite get a toolbit into.

loose nut
03-08-2011, 12:33 PM
My first lathe was an Unimat Sl, my first shop was the back of a long 3' wide closet. After that I bought a 9 x 20" which I used for 20 years, it is a good little lathe, if used within it's capacity. Better then a 6" Craftsman and probably as good as some types of the 9" Atlas. I now have a 13 x 40" lathe but I still have the other 2.

Bob Fisher
03-08-2011, 01:06 PM
I tried an AXA on mty 9x20and thought it too big. Bought a mini dorian, don't recall the part#, But it is perfect on a 9x20. It is a wedge design and works well. Bob Fisher.

Alistair Hosie
03-08-2011, 01:52 PM
A Nine by twenty will be a great starter lathe , and you may get bigger later if you feel the need, and keep it as a second lathe ,or sell it .They are very sellable used condition,and I genuinely wish you every happiness with it.I love my lathe and mill and the workshops I have bring me loads of joy to anotherwise would quickly have become a tv filled world.
I decided long ago to watch tv early on in the morning catch up with the news and come to the day a bit at a time slowly.Then in the evening I am mostly on computer and the rest of the time I read or am in my workshops so don't pay any attention to the naysayers it will bring you alot of joy and as said I wish you lot's of luck and fun with your new lathe.God |Bless and very kindest regards Alistair