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Elninio
03-08-2011, 04:50 PM
I'll be using this thread to talk various projects about it.

-It is not yet identified. Could be an early model of the 'royal' brand.
-Not sure what kind of oil to use for it, is the gear oil supposed to be different from the way oil? I'm working on a self-lubrication system.
-I'm experimenting with rubbing alchohol coolants. It should spit about one drop every few seconds, nothing dangerous. Having it spout 'mist' is dangerous!
There's another thread discussing pros/cons. I'm just testing for fun.
-It has not been bolted yet. Hockey pucks were a disaster (the machine was stable, but the finish was poor), and I don't recommend this for even a small shaper like mine. An interesting story here about large shapers having danced their wait across the shot floor, even after being bolted (albeit incorrectly) http://www.neme-s.org/shapers/columns/shaper_column_11.html. Update:
-I'm currently working on a control box (Originally here,http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=46629)
-I'm trying to adjust for the waves and poor surface finishes it produces with a properly sharpened shear tool. Here's a 50x magnification taken from my phone with a jeweler's lens. Material is a block of some cheap generic steel, cut was rather heavy at 1/8th, but no chatter:
http://i53.tinypic.com/kbq1zn.jpg

Various depths in aluminium:
http://i51.tinypic.com/10z35z9.jpg
The ondulations isn't a camera effect in the previous picture - you can feel it with your thumb.

http://i52.tinypic.com/2u88oy8.jpg
The scales (like the hair) produced could be due to the tool retracting back over the block being cut. Some shapers have a mechanism to lift the tool as it's sliding back, though I think the purpose of this is to not dull the knife as its sliding back over abrasive materials such as cast iron and rusted metals. In one of Kay's shaper documents, they also recommend putting a chamfer on the ends of these materials, so that your cutting tool doesn't dull.

Update: 3/16ths cut in aluminium works great (the left-most chip is 3/16ths):
http://i55.tinypic.com/16lwmty.jpg

Elninio
03-08-2011, 05:00 PM
Here's some pictures to help identification (continued from http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=41996. Lots of pictures here of similar small shapers):

http://i52.tinypic.com/ld6pj.jpg

http://i51.tinypic.com/27xjvc3.jpg

http://i52.tinypic.com/r8f4ly.jpg
This is the plate of the distributor, I've emailed them but no luck.

http://i52.tinypic.com/f3t00z.jpg
The motor rotary vane pump of the motor.

Elninio
03-08-2011, 05:05 PM
Control box based on schematic found here http://www.neme-s.org/shapers/columns/shaper_column_55.html:
http://www.neme-s.org/shapers/columns/shaper_column_55_files/limitswitch400.gif
My variation of the plan comming shortly.

http://i51.tinypic.com/23ih25d.jpg
The large green button is for backing out the table out of a limit switch after it has been stopped after an automatic operation. The button glows green to show me the shaper is powered on. The schematic above doesn't need four LEDS; if switch two is tripped, three and four are not powered. The reason I put four is to know that my switches aren't broken before running an automatic operation. What's worth more to you; a few extra LED's, or a busted gear train? The switch contacts will be covered in some sort of cast plastic to protect against oils - I think i'll do epoxy. How well does epoxy survive temperature changes? It gets as cold as -30 celcius in winter and 30 celcius in the summer; will it crack? The LED's are green/red. I used 220 Ohm resistors for the red, 200 Ohm for the greens. Here's a link explaining how to calculate LED resitances: http://www.kpsec.freeuk.com/components/led.htm

http://i51.tinypic.com/6yl8oj.jpg
These are the switches I used, four of them. The current they will handle is 600mA, 12V, 7$ each (if I hadn't throw out my old dot-matrix printers, I could have salvaged the switches from there, maybe I still have them somewhere).

ammcoman2
03-08-2011, 06:24 PM
The undulations in the finish may be caused by too much clearance in the Ram ways. The ram is running on a film of oil and pressure from the tool could be lifting it. I had this problem on my Ammco (V-way ram) after I rebuilt it. Resetting the gib fixed the problem.

Also check the front clearance of the tool bit - should be about 3 degrees. Too much and it can dig in.

Geoff

Elninio
03-08-2011, 06:30 PM
The undulations in the finish may be caused by too much clearance in the Ram ways. The ram is running on a film of oil and pressure from the tool could be lifting it. I had this problem on my Ammco (V-way ram) after I rebuilt it. Resetting the gib fixed the problem.

Also check the front clearance of the tool bit - should be about 3 degrees. Too much and it can dig in.

Geoff

This is with an 8degree tool all around, after changing form hockey-puck to 1/2" plywood between the base and the floor.

The finish is between these two pictures (camera effect in both):
http://i56.tinypic.com/2qkl0ur.jpg
http://i54.tinypic.com/2hd7jnq.jpg
http://i55.tinypic.com/24vunog.jpg

50x magnification:
http://i54.tinypic.com/14xndli.jpg

mc_n_g
03-08-2011, 11:13 PM
How much back rake do you have on the tool bit. Too much will cause the tool to dig in. I try not to put any on my bit. I grind to one side and and have maybe 3-5 degrees on the bottom of the tool to have it clear the part.
Another thing to consider is how far is your bit sticking out from your pivot point of the clapper box? I find it better to have the bit as near to the pivot point as possible.

firbikrhd1
03-09-2011, 01:03 AM
I make no claim as a Shaper expert, to be sure. I do have some experience with a 7" South Bend Shaper which resides in my shop and have learned that I get a much better finish when I don't use a tool holder, instead I just place the tool bit directly in the tool post. The additional overhang added by a tool holder can cause spring when machining harder materials. It doesn't seem to be so much of a problem with aluminum.

Just as with a lathe, rigidity makes all the difference. Another source of "spring" may be from lack of support at the front of the table. I can't tell from your pictures whether your shaper has a support there or not. It appears not to have one. My South Bend does and the support leg must be adjusted properly when I move the table up or down. If your shaper doesn't not have a support you might want to try to design one.

One other thought is the radius on your tool bit. Just as with a lathe if too much nose contacts the work you can get chatter. You may be seeing the result of chatter in the "undulations" you can see in your finish. If I must use a tool holder for clearance I pay special attention to overhang, sharpness and shape of the tool bit including the nose radius and usually get good results. If I need a really smooth finish I use a shear tool, fine feed .002" or .003"/stroke and .001" - .002" depth of cut to finish. In your pictures it appears that you feed may be greater than that, particularly if you are using a shear tool. It may be only the picture and magnification that gives that impression.

Another thing to pay attention to with regard to overhang is placement of the tool head. It should not extend below the bottom of the ram any more than necessary for the depth of cut. Be sure the gibs are properly adjusted on all ways including the tool head and that the clapper isn't worn badly with either side play or play in the taper pin at the pivot point.

I don't think it would cause the trouble you are seeing, but it's easy to get the stroke/feed directions reversed. The sideways feed should take place on the return stroke. Getting them reversed is easy to do if you reverse table feed direction without changing the "side of center" of the feed per stroke adjustment. The main thing is to be sure the table moves on the back stroke of the ram and remains motionless on the forward cutting stroke.

Lastly, the material you are machining can cause trouble. Hard spots and some cold rolled steels don't machine well. Think about some hardware store bolts that people occasionally complain about machining and getting a rough finish. The same problem exists on a shaper.

You mentioned you have no gib adjustment on the vertical gib. There may be a shim pack when you disassemble the machine with several shims glued together. You peel off shims in various thicknesses to adjust the gib clearance. The chamfer you mention may help with preventing tool dulling but it also is to prevent a burr at the edge of the work.

The Artful Bodger
03-09-2011, 02:28 AM
First, thats not a little shaper!:p My Adept Two is a little shaper.;)

On my little shaper I found it was much better at taking a wide shallow chip than a deep narrow one. When you think about it that puts the majority of the stress on the pushing the ram sideways rather than trying to lift the ram.

I initially had patterns exactly like you show there and it was just a matter of adjusting to cut more on the side rather than the end of the tool tip. Tightening the ram gibs also helped in may case.

It took me months before I could confidently put a bit of steel in the shaper and expect a fine finish but then I am a rather slow learner.;)

Elninio
03-09-2011, 10:14 AM
Editing this post to add more content:

One of Darin's tools, it's got a high rake, and 1/8ths radiuses on the end. He broke the edges with a very smooth file (and the tool tips). Produces a nice finish. The piece in the background is the shaper's table - looks pretty rough, no? Recently I put a micrometer on the ram and noticed it's cutting perfectly square over three inches. I find it hard to believe, will try a test cut with the piece on the table; the pieces held in the vice were not square.
http://img218.imageshack.us/img218/9491/img2011050300205.jpg

The finish on the left is with his tool, the finish on the right is from my old tool, mentioned in previous posts. Check out the chips. They're smooth, no chatter marks. The cut was about 3/16ths. The shear tool next to Darin's tool produces a similar (the same) finish - perhaps it needs more side rake?
http://img825.imageshack.us/img825/7391/img2011043000199.jpg

Chips from Darin's tool, and from my old one
http://img200.imageshack.us/img200/7690/img2011043000198.jpg

Elninio
03-09-2011, 10:19 AM
You mentioned you have no gib adjustment on the vertical gib. There may be a shim pack when you disassemble the machine with several shims glued together. You peel off shims in various thicknesses to adjust the gib clearance. The chamfer you mention may help with preventing tool dulling but it also is to prevent a burr at the edge of the work.
Just to be clear, we're talking about the gid that is horizontal, but when tightened holds the ram down. This cannot be shimmed as any shim you add increases the play.

boslab
03-09-2011, 10:43 AM
that strange artifact on the square tube looks like a material fault, skin lamination springs to mind
mark

mc_n_g
03-09-2011, 02:09 PM
I would say try the bit alone instead of using the tool holder. It seems very viable to me that your tool holder may be springing in the material. I would also check the amount of advance of the table per cut.

WCPenney
03-09-2011, 05:11 PM
Blue up and check the clapper hinge pin. On my Ammco shaper, the hinge pin is tapered. Over time, wear of the pin, clapper, or the ears the pin passes through will allow the clapper to pivot or shift slightly when it enters the work and wander around on long cuts. Odd patterns will be especially noticeable with a radius on the end of the tool as it can ride around more.

The clapper should be a snug sliding fit and sit flat into it's recess as well. Make sure the clapper box is very clean and lightly oiled.

If the clapper sticks "up" a tiny bit (i.e. wont close all the way), the tool may enter the work shallow then settle in leaving an odd finish.

Try checking the down feed slide for a worn nut or loose gibs, and make sure the down feed slide pivot is holding nice and tight.

The Artful Bodger
03-09-2011, 05:14 PM
that strange artifact on the square tube looks like a material fault, skin lamination springs to mind
mark


I doubt it, that is just what my little shaper does if the ram gibs are loose. I presume the tool hits the work and the rake digs it in and starts the cut. At some point, maybe due to spring in the tool holder or something else, the tool bounces up as the ram lifts and from then on the tool skids across the surface. Next cuts sees this step and it bounces up too, and so on.

In my case, I put my hand on the ram and could feel the 'bump' at the start of the rough part.

Elninio
03-09-2011, 08:13 PM
The small undulations cannot be felt on the aluminium work piece, but can be clearly felt if my hand is on the ram. I think the problem is the brass (square piece?) that pushes the ram forward and rides connected to the gear - there is a bit of play in that and a slight click can be heard as the ram changes directions. The sound goes away if I assist the ram into changing directions by pushing it. I don't know if this is known to cause this much of a noticeable problem, but it is not adjustable, and am afraid if I rebuild this piece, I'll have to rebuild it again in the future. Could also be caused by the temperature in my garage. The fellow who made this piece probably did it at ambient temperature, and its about -5 celcius in my garage right now.

firbikrhd1
03-09-2011, 08:27 PM
Just to be clear, we're talking about the gid that is horizontal, but when tightened holds the ram down. This cannot be shimmed as any shim you add increases the play.

I think you misunderstood my point, perhaps I wasn't clear. The shims are called laminated shims similar to these:
http://www.accutrex.com/accupeel_laminated_shims.html

IF it was built that way, the shims are there from the factory, installed when the shaper was new. As wear takes place the multi-layered shim that the factory installed has layers removed to allow the ways to move closer together. This method of gib adjustment is used on some machines, my Dad's 10" Atlas lathe for one.

Since I am not familiar with your particular machine I can't say whether there is a shim pack of this type in place or not, but it seems strange that a quality machine would be produced without some method of adjusting the various ways. Your machine looks like a quality piece, were it me I would be checking to see if there are any laminated shims installed. They might be easy to overlook and appear as a simple metal strip, particularly if they have years and layers of gunk on them. They are actually stuck together at the factory (laminated) and must be peeled apart to adjust them.

Your shaper looks very much like an early version of a Royal Shaper seen on this page: http://www.lathes.co.uk/royalshaper/
If it truly is a Royal, Tony at the web site above may be able to provide you with a manual.

Elninio
03-13-2011, 06:31 PM
I have it cutting 1/8ths depth cuts like butter now, in a block of steel. The tubing was probably extra-hard, too hard for the HSS to cut without vibrations. It make some horrible vibrations at random intervals of the tubing - like at one end. It wasn't the first cut, so you can't blame it on being a deeper cut on that end. Also sound weird ondulations towards the edge.

50x magnificantion on my heavy steel cut, taken with my phone through a jewler's lens of china quality (distortion around the orbit, good lenses don't have this problem like my 10x romanian):
http://i53.tinypic.com/kbq1zn.jpg

There is a shingles effect here, different from the one I originally described. The cure for the original was adding an 8deg side-rake on my cutting tool, this made a big improvement. The side-rake on a side-cut is actually the top rake. Not as bad as it seems:
http://i53.tinypic.com/24600av.jpg

I want the shaper to produce a finish like this. I've seen others' shear tool produce this, mine hasn't, and maybe its a camera effect, is it possible?
http://i53.tinypic.com/25hdemd.jpg


Here's the square tube on the exact same setup. Depth of cut has stayed constant, at something like 0.015". Notice aberation around the beginning of the stroke, and the towards the last stroke some serious vibrations in the cut. This makes me think the material is too hard for cutting on this flimsy setup of mine. The wavy line in the center is the clapper box dropping on the material on the return stroke, it drops there because of momentum on the return stroke that keeps the tool in the air as it's returning. You've guess it, I've run it at the shaper's fast speed. Low speed produces a poorer finish, and the same vibrations; I only did this for testing purpose.
http://i52.tinypic.com/30s85d2.jpg

I noticed that the top axle has play and is moving around in the top bronze bushing. I noticed by the reflection in the oil. I'm not sure I can feel it, may just be my mind playing tricks on me, and I can't tell it apart from all the other sounds. I'll investigate another time, but it could be crucial. Ammcoman (Geoff) did you encouter this problem when you replaced your bushings?

firbikrhd1
03-14-2011, 09:20 AM
I believe your shear tool may be ground improperly or not very sharp. The nose radius on the shear tool I ground is about the same radius aas my pinky finger nail and the side rake is about 45 degrees. Relief is about 5 degrees or so, I just eyeballed that. My tool leaves a very nice finish on steel or aluminum. I use only about .002" or .003" depth of cut for finishing with this tool.

http://i283.photobucket.com/albums/kk287/firbikrhd1/P3140026.jpg

http://i283.photobucket.com/albums/kk287/firbikrhd1/P3140024.jpg

http://i283.photobucket.com/albums/kk287/firbikrhd1/P3140028.jpg

Elninio
03-14-2011, 12:25 PM
[QUOTE=firbikrhd1] ... QUOTE]

I've sharpened my shear tool like that too, but I'll try it again, this time on the large block instead of the tube. It was producing the distinct chips, just the finish wasn't so nice. Could you show us pictures of your finishes in steel and aluminium?

The Artful Bodger
03-14-2011, 03:05 PM
I think you are trying to take too heavy cuts. Maybe when that shaper was new it could handle that but now, with various wear points all aggregated, you need to take it a little easier.

Elninio
03-14-2011, 04:18 PM
I think you are trying to take too heavy cuts. Maybe when that shaper was new it could handle that but now, with various wear points all aggregated, you need to take it a little easier.
No this isn't the case, there isn't much difference between heavy and light cuts in this case. I haven't done a 1/2" depth cut, but I'm sure that would be a disaster, like you say. My heavy cuts in steel are 1/8th depth.

ammcoman2
03-14-2011, 06:51 PM
"--- Ammcoman (Geoff) did you encouter this problem when you replaced your bushings? ---"

Hi there. Sorry I didn't get back to you sooner - my checking habits are not consistent!

That photo is a result of two possible scenarios and I have seen them on my Ammco.
1) the gibs are too loose allowing the Ram to rise up.
and/or 2) the table is deflecting as the load on the part increases.

Another possibility is that the tool bit does not have enough room before engaging the work to drop down - I allow at least 1/4".

On "2" I lock the foot then release pressure on the table riser before locking the table.

Replacing the bushings, worn shafts and the yoke block didn't affect the above but the machine ran a whole lot quieter.

Geoff

P.S perhaps a visit is in order - let me know.

The Artful Bodger
03-14-2011, 07:51 PM
No this isn't the case, there isn't much difference between heavy and light cuts in this case. I haven't done a 1/2" depth cut, but I'm sure that would be a disaster, like you say. My heavy cuts in steel are 1/8th depth.


I think yours are all heavy cuts. What is the horizontal feed with your 1/8th cuts? Thats is a lot of metal being taken off.

Like I suggested earlier, reduce your vertical feed and see what happens.

A heavy vertical cut puts more force on the vertical components of your shaper, the ram slides for example and the table slides too.

You might have the ram totally supported by the dovetail at the start of the cut but as the ram comes forward less and less of it is supported and eventually the head end rides up and you get those steps in your work. Tightening the ram gibs might help but on an old machine the dovetails are no long exactly straight and parallel so by the time you have it snugged up in one place it is too tight in another.

However, a heavy horizontal feed combined with a light vertical feed puts all the forces on a different plane.

IMHO.

firbikrhd1
03-14-2011, 10:00 PM
[QUOTE=firbikrhd1] ... QUOTE]

I've sharpened my shear tool like that too, but I'll try it again, this time on the large block instead of the tube. It was producing the distinct chips, just the finish wasn't so nice. Could you show us pictures of your finishes in steel and aluminium?

I failed to mention that in addition to using only a .002" -.003" depth of cut the horizontal feed about the same. The idea here is that the horizontal feed is no greater than the width of the contact point of the tool, preferably less. Your photos appear to show a horizontal feed considerably greater than that.
The chips will appear as very fine curls.

Unfortunately I have no really good pictures of the finishes I obtain but perhaps these will give you an idea: For some reason the pictures make the finishes appear less smooth than they do in person. Perhaps something to do with digital photos and pixels?

Steel:
http://i283.photobucket.com/albums/kk287/firbikrhd1/P1130001.jpg

Aluminum:
http://i283.photobucket.com/albums/kk287/firbikrhd1/P1050073.jpg

http://i283.photobucket.com/albums/kk287/firbikrhd1/P3140030.jpg

Elninio
03-15-2011, 10:45 PM
I've made some progress in the finish I'm able to produce. I've ground a 30 degrees 0.5"x0.5" 5%cobalt HSS dovetail tool (made in india), the finish is great. Previously I was using 0%cobalt 0.25"x0.25" bit in a toolholder. The angles are the same. I cut down in the angle by feeding the head, then back out of the dovetail with the automatic feed. Pictures comming tomorrow, I've yet to cut the other side's dovetail before I remove the pieces from the machine.

Elninio
05-08-2011, 11:43 PM
Put my toolroom vice on the shaper and ran a test indicator over it, it dips away from the shaper for 2.5 thou over two inches, so that's about 7.5 thou for the 6" stroke - unacceptable. Is it worth attempting to machine the surface, or try to adjust it somehow and possibly consider scraping?

I've also added updates by editing previous posts, to keep the thread dense ...

Duffy
05-09-2011, 09:29 AM
Elninio, way back in the early days of HSM, Rudy Kouhoupt did an article on improving shaper finish. He reasoned that, assuming all the moving bits were correctly adjusted, the problem devolved to tool holder rigidity and tool spring. He proceded to build a new clapper block with three different tool holder holes, all of them located so that the cutting edge of the tool was as close as possible to the vertical line through the pivot pin. Personally, I think that one size would have been sufficient. The results of his trial were the proof of his theory. the finish was virtually mirror smooth.
I was going to try this on my Atlas, but I dont yet have a #8 taper pin reamer for the clapper pivot pin.

Richard Wilson
05-09-2011, 10:05 AM
[QUOTE=Elninio]Put my toolroom vice on the shaper and ran a test indicator over it, it dips away from the shaper for 2.5 thou over two inches, so that's about 7.5 thou for the 6" stroke - unacceptable. Is it worth attempting to machine the surface, or try to adjust it somehow and possibly consider scraping?
Did you make sure the vertical table gib was adjusted properly and the slide locked before you did that test? Does your machine have a table support leg, and if so, was it in use? Shapers are very prone to table droop, and if all else fails, yes you can take a skim off the top, but make sure everything else is adjusted properly first.

Richard

Elninio
05-09-2011, 02:24 PM
Everything is tight. The machine doesn't have table support (see my pictures on page 1).

This may be Rudy's page: http://www.craftsmanshipmuseum.com/kouhoupt.htm

Brazilli0n on youtube writes;


Rudy Kouhoupt had been through a lot in his lifetime. He was a navigator on the Enola Gay (after it came back from dropping the H bomb in Japan). He then got a PhD in chemistry and worked in the corporate world until his parents were dying from cancer. He then moved back home and took up machining. He provided regular articles and projects for Popular Mechanics for 10 years (1770 - 1980). After that, he wrote for Home Shop Machinist and Live Steam magazines until his death in 2004.

http://www.craftsmanshipmuseum.com/images/Rudy13.jpg

Rudy's shaper video, is this the clapper box he built?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZRvZDBBXDXY

Elninio
06-01-2013, 10:35 PM
I have finally identified this shaper, its Alfred Eriksen (Alba), see here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45qMBvcLKrw
http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/attachments/f19/48707d1331703784-german-alfred-eriksen-shaper-untitled.jpg

The name is important, because you can find many like it under 'Alfred Eriksen' , but not many under 'Alba'. So who was Alfred Eriksen?
http://i1268.photobucket.com/albums/jj571/enginenut2/germanshaper14.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/7RA0xuM.jpg

The man who owns this shaper restores many old machines: http://shanewhitlock.com/photo/v/misc/

The tag on my machine (see page 1) says A.R. Williams but vintagemachinery.org says: "We presume that these machines were built by (or for) A. R. Williams Machinery Co." The name Eriksen disproves this - it shows they were made in germany and imported here. According to their website, A. R. Williams Machinery was founded in Toronto in 1878. In 1903 they expanded to Winnipeg and in 1942 they opened locations in Alberta. In 1984 the Alberta operations were acquired by Arnie Charbonneau and those operations were incorporated as A. R. Williams Materials Handling Ltd.

I have discovered that A.R. Williams has been bought out since then, their website redirects to http://forklifts.cervusequipment.com/

JRouche
06-01-2013, 11:49 PM
Very cool El. Loved the vid. Im a Metal Shaper fan. My lil pic? What do they call it? An Avatar. Well its my lil 7" Logan on all the forums I go to. Come on HSM allow avatars. They are hosted but dont take up any room. 57k each maybe. No hard drive buy needed. :) Kidding. I cant run a website.

Nice shaper El, I do like the lines..... I have a couple of old castings (Hardinge horizontal mill, Southbend lathe and I have to say. They are more curvy than the castings today. I have a Big Butted Monarch 10EE and she is my pride and JOY. Ever use a machine that doest move. Shur, I have used a 24" Prentice. Long bed. But it was a lil too long for my garage. My good friend Del owned it. And it had great lines. Well for a small lathe the M is pretty well the holder for bulk along with the Rivett.

How the heck did I go from shapers to lathes? Solly. My bust. Love them Shapers. Remember Mr. Volz......... Art? A metal shaper fan also.

JR

partsproduction
10-13-2015, 12:29 AM
ElNinio,
I also have an Alfred Eriksen shaper. I was trying to figure out what the steel rod in the boss cast in just forward of the input pulley was, then I saw yours and knew, it is for a cover that swings either up or is attached by a screw or nut.
Another mystery discovered.
Mine has a Turner Unidrive 4 speed gearbox at the back, a very poorly engineered setup too, but that gives me 8 speeds with the two at the back. The dog clutch on the shaft of that two speed gear at the back looks like it is designed to be engaged on the fly, although maybe not at higher speeds.

The shaper has a ten inch stroke and the bull gear is a beefy 30 MM width.

My slowest speed is like 26 strokes per minute the fastest is about 190 or more. The motor is a Craftsman single phase 3/4 HP.
I'd really like to talk with you but not sure about LD phone procedure across borders. My email adress is partsproduction@centurylink.net

Rosco-P
10-13-2015, 06:33 AM
Elnino hasn't been online since January.

partsproduction
10-14-2015, 04:43 PM
Oh oh.

sasquatch
10-14-2015, 05:33 PM
Can't offer any more suggestions here, but thanks for the interesting post and good pics.