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View Full Version : Tool Gloat: My Scrapyard Rescue



dkhntr04
03-17-2011, 09:37 PM
So I went to my local scrapyard to buy about 100# of steel for a trailer project and a new welding bench. Turns out this mill followed me home. My wife was impressed that it managed to get in the truck and strap itself down without help ;).

As soon as I walked in the yard I saw this mill laying half on it's side partially covered in scrap.The owner seemed like he wanted it gone, and I obliged. In the end I paid a grand total of $150 for 1200# of machine.:)

I'll have more info and pics once I get it out of my pickup this weekend. What I know so far is it was made in Japan and imported by Enterprise Machine Tools, Inc. of Minneapolis, MN. Model HHM 1/2 and made in May 1964. It is 3-phase and stands about 5' tall. The vertical attachment has an MT2 taper, and the main spindle taper is MT3. The whole machine appears to be manufactured in inches. Overall, the rust is only surface corrosion, the table moves smooth and free, and the ways show little wear.

My plan for the machine is to disassemble the table and knee and clean everything good, clean off the rust and flaking paint, add a VFD, and put it to work. I'm guessing this will compliment my RF-30 and Jet 1024 quite well.

A quick internet search netted nearly nothing, so I'm guessing it is quite rare. Any info would be greatly appreciated as usual. Enjoy the pics.

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d65/natewoz/100_0346.jpg

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d65/natewoz/100_0348.jpg

dkhntr04
03-17-2011, 09:38 PM
http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d65/natewoz/100_0353.jpg

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d65/natewoz/100_0351.jpg

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d65/natewoz/100_0350.jpg

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d65/natewoz/100_0345.jpg

Black_Moons
03-17-2011, 09:50 PM
Very weird mill. I kinda like the 'slim' head without the motor directly attached. The top ram looks weird though, I bet it could be converted to a horzontal mill easily somehow..

dkhntr04
03-17-2011, 09:51 PM
Very weird mill. I kinda like the 'slim' head without the motor directly attached. The top ram looks weird though, I bet it could be converted to a horzontal mill easily somehow..

I is a horizontal mill with a vertical attachment on it. The bearing support is hung on the backside of the machine right now.

Ken_Shea
03-17-2011, 09:57 PM
Good for you, I hate seeing old machinery that is or at least was high quality, scrapped.

I'm interested in seeing what is in the back, after the rear cover is removed.

Does it have a quill feed?
.

EddyCurr
03-17-2011, 10:07 PM
A quick internet search netted nearly nothing, so I'm guessing
it is quite rare. Any info would be greatly appreciated as usual.
Probably not related, but there is a company of the same name a little
south of Minneapolis


ENTERPRISE MACHINE TOOLS INC (http://start.cortera.com/company/research/k2q4ktj2r/enterprise-machine-tools-inc/)
12700 ZENITH AVE,
BURNSVILLE, MN 55337-6011

.

dkhntr04
03-17-2011, 10:09 PM
Good for you, I hate seeing old machinery that is or at least was high quality, scrapped.

I'm interested in seeing what is in the back, after the rear cover is removed.

Does it have a quill feed?
.

Looks like I forgot that pic. Here it is. The mill has variable speed controlled by the large variable diameter pulley in the middle that is adjusted by a handwheel from the outside.

No quill feed unfortunately.

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d65/natewoz/100_0356.jpg

EddyCurr
03-17-2011, 10:17 PM
The mill has variable speed controlled by the large variable diameter
pulley in the middle that is adjusted by a handwheel from the outside.That is a nice and unexpected feature.

.

EddyCurr
03-17-2011, 10:21 PM
Did you ask about the machine's provenance while at the scrap yard?

If they can't or won't tell you where it came from, I bet that a little local
detective work will turn turn up some information about who used to operate
it.

There may also be someone in town who can translate the name plate, too.

.

dkhntr04
03-17-2011, 10:31 PM
Did you ask about the machine's provenance while at the scrap yard?

If they can't or won't tell you where it came from, I bet that a little local
detective work will turn turn up some information about who used to operate
it.

There may also be someone in town who can translate the name plate, too.

.

The proprietor said he had no idea of the history of the machine. I hadn't been to that scrapyard in over a year, but from the condition and location of the machine I'd bet it was dropped off right before freeze-up since it was outside with what I would consider minimal rust.

On the translation, I'll either have my Japanese friend from college or the Japanese translator at my wife's work take a look at it.

PeteF
03-17-2011, 10:33 PM
Very weird mill. I kinda like the 'slim' head without the motor directly attached. The top ram looks weird though, I bet it could be converted to a horzontal mill easily somehow..

It already is a horizontal mill, hence the overarm on top.

Nice find, especially for the price! Does the motor run?

The problem I've noticed with a lot of horizontal mills is that if you put a vertical head on them you don't have a lot of headroom left. I have a major issue with that on my little mill, it's already weeny, but with the vertical head the headroom becomes very small. This machine looks much better in that regard though. It's nice to have the flexibility to easily do both vertical and horizontal milling. Deserved gloat :D

doctor demo
03-17-2011, 10:40 PM
So I went to my local scrapyard to buy about 100# of steel for a trailer project and a new welding bench. Turns out this mill followed me home. My wife was impressed that it managed to get in the truck and strap itself down without help ;).

That is going to make a small welding table, and probably not much else left for trailer parts either:D
You better go back for the right steel and try to save the mill for milling:)
Steve

dkhntr04
03-17-2011, 10:43 PM
Nice find, especially for the price! Does the motor run?


I'm not sure, I don't have 3-phase service. I figured for the price I got it for, if it needed a motor on it I could manage that. I'll have to get a vfd for it once I get it all cleaned up. The belt was a recent replacement and the cord is still on the machine, so I hold out hope that it will run.

wierdscience
03-17-2011, 10:46 PM
Nice mill,it's stout enough to make the other two machines hang they're heads in shame.

PeteF
03-17-2011, 10:50 PM
Are you planning to get an arbor and use this as a horizontal? You didn't happen to have a scratch around and see if the arbor support was tossed out with it too? If not, could be worth a trip back to the pile it was sitting in to see if anything else like that was thrown out with the machine. It wouldn't be difficult to make one, but if it's just laying there in the dirt it could save you the trouble.

Pete

gary350
03-17-2011, 11:00 PM
I shop at the scrap yard all the time. Most of that stuff at the scrap yard is right where it belongs. I sold a vertical mill for scrap metal a few years ago. It worked fine but it was a antique monsiter very slow and hard to use. It had power feed on all 3 axis.

dkhntr04
03-17-2011, 11:02 PM
I have the arbor support, it is on the back of the arm. It is hard to see in the pictures but if you try you'll see it.

No arbor, I looked around a bit but did not see anything. I may go back to scour some more. The spindle has an MT3 taper, so making one should not be hard.

BTW, the 100# of steel was to finish those two projects, I already had most of the materials. I did end up coming home with 350# of steel too.

Dr Stan
03-17-2011, 11:30 PM
Nice find, how big is the table?

wtrueman
03-17-2011, 11:51 PM
Send the unit to me and I'll try the unit out and let you know how it works. Wayne. (Ps: we try harder up here in Canada.!! PPS: It looks good for you.!

dkhntr04
03-18-2011, 12:10 AM
Nice find, how big is the table?

The clamping area is somewhere around 6" wide by 26-28" or so, I didn't take any measurements, this is going off eye/memory. Cross travel is 5", I did measure that, longitudinal looks like around 18" or so.

justanengineer
03-18-2011, 08:56 AM
Nice save. I always love the machines that have a variable drive system the best...lets me dial in the speed to make the cutter happy without losing power. When you get it up and running, please keep us updated. I am rather curious if those MT spindles will take a big hogging cut. Im assuming theyre held in with a drawbar?

DR
03-18-2011, 09:42 AM
[QUOTE=dkhntr04

.................................................. ............................................

I'll have to get a vfd for it once I get it all cleaned up.

.................................................. ...........................................

[/QUOTE]

It looks like a very nice small mill.

A susggestion........

Try it out BEFORE you spend the time/effort to clean it up. Many times older mills are scrapped because they have a major issue like stripped gearing that is not feasible or economical to repair.

Can you beg, borrow or steal a rotary converter or VFD from a friend?

Boostinjdm
03-18-2011, 11:36 AM
If it's not too hard to load back up. Take it to the local elevator or find a farmer. Lot's of farms and elevators have 3 phase. You might be able to bribe someone to let you plug it in.

Rosco-P
03-18-2011, 12:44 PM
You can kick the motor over with little more than a 220vac line and a start capacitor momentarily applied between one of the 220 legs and the third motor phase. A basic static phase converter. No need to replace the motor with a single phase one. Search this site or visit the phase converter section on PM.

dkhntr04
03-18-2011, 10:36 PM
I did some more checking today, all the table and knee leadscrews work good. I rotated the spindle by hand and it turns smooth and easy. The surface rust comes right up with some penetrating oil and very little effort with a scotchbrite pad.

Table size is 8x32 with the working surface at 6x28.

I checked over the wiring and it looks complete, I'll probably drag it to my work before I unload it and plug it in to the three phase service there. Thanks for the replies!

SGW
03-19-2011, 07:40 AM
You don't even need a capacitor to try the motor. Wrap a cord around the pulley, give it a good yank to start the motor spinning, and apply 220V single phase to two of the three motor leads.

dkhntr04
03-19-2011, 09:37 PM
I took the mill to work and hooked it to the 3-phase service there. After a couple cycles of the switch, the motor started fine and ran smooth. The variable speed worked great and there was no unusual noises. Time to break out the cleaning supplies :) .

Thanks for all the input!