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radkins
03-19-2011, 02:28 PM
I was just outside here in East Tn doing some spring yard work when I heard this roar coming from over the mountains, looking up I was treated to the sight of not one but three bright shinny DC 3's flying in V formation! :) They were at about 2000 ft and the sound of those six big radial engines could actually be felt as well as heard. When I went back inside my wife asked "what was that awful Racket out there"? RACKET? What racket? :confused: Hey watch your mouth woman, the sound of a gaggle of big ole, radial engines is NOT RACKET! :mad:

Being a pilot and aviation buff I love to see these old birds any chance I get and getting to see three of them in pristine condition flying in formation was quite a thrill, can't help but wonder who they are and where they were headed?

DFMiller
03-19-2011, 02:43 PM
That would have been a sight. When I was at CAF Socal last weekend they have one under restoration. There is of course the AA one at Smith museum at DFW and if you want to see them flying every week on TV tune into Ice Pilots NWT on satellite to seen the antics of Buffalo Air who use one on a sked every day.

I hope you got some video.
Dave

Bob Fisher
03-19-2011, 02:57 PM
I love the sound of a rotary engine. Even the model engines at the NAMES show have that distinctive exhaust note. I was fortunate to get a ride on an 80 yr old Ford trimotor in Fort Wayne Ind.about 10 yrs ago. Took my son and grandson . First time in the air for my grandson. Awesome experience. Bob Fisher.

tmc_31
03-19-2011, 04:00 PM
I love the sound of a rotary engine. Even the model engines at the NAMES show have that distinctive exhaust note. I was fortunate to get a ride on an 80 yr old Ford trimotor in Fort Wayne Ind.about 10 yrs ago. Took my son and grandson . First time in the air for my grandson. Awesome experience. Bob Fisher.

I got to ride a Ford Tri-Motor at Airventure a few years ago. That and a Bell 47. My 14 yo nephew and I flew my pacer up there and spent the week camping in the North 40. And an awesome week it was!!:D
Tim

saltmine
03-19-2011, 04:22 PM
Let's get it right, guys. A "rotary" engine is descriptive of the Mazda rotary, or Wankel engine. It also describes the Le Rhone Monosupe rotary engines, used in World War one Sopwith Camels and Fokker DR-1 Triplanes. The differnece between a rotary engine and a radial is that the rotary, for the most part, has it's crankshaft affixed to the firewall, the propeller is bolted to the crankcase and the whole engine rotates around the crank. A radial engine has it's cylinders arranged around the crankcase in a radial fashion, and thurns the crankshaft and propeller in a conventional way.

BTW, "radial" engines sound way better than "rotaries".

Rotary engines were not too popular in the US, but they loved them in Europe.

Willy
03-19-2011, 04:29 PM
I realize that the DC-3s still flying have had a lot of upgrades, to not only the airframe, engines, and avionics, but you still have to have a lot of respect for an airplane that has been an icon of air transport since 1935!

Although they are available now turbine powered (http://www.baslerturbo.com/), you can't beat the sound of a big old radial engine.

Here ya go Radkins, just in case your wife missed it:D , here's a few low fly bys from a nice example at an air show in Iceland 2006.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LyUJIC6I7ic

Crank up the volume!

kf2qd
03-19-2011, 08:05 PM
Had a number of radila planes flying down in Brownsville TX last weekend. 2 Goonies, a B25, B26, Skyraider, Beach D18 and a 1940 WACO UPF 7 that was much modified.

Unfortunately the WACO had engine problems and the pilot and his wife (Wing walker) were injured. Please keep Kyle and Amanda Franklin in your prayers as they recover from extensive burns.

v860rich
03-19-2011, 10:53 PM
I was stationed in Minot ND between '66 and '70, a SAC base who's mission was B52's and KC/EC 135's we had a T33, C54 and a C47 (goony bird/DC3). I spent many a day in their hanger keeping them fit to fly.
Way better than out on the flite line -30F with a 25 knot wind.

THANX RICH

People say I'm getting crankier as I get older. That's not it. I just find I enjoy annoying people a lot more now. Especially younger people!!!

aostling
03-20-2011, 12:30 AM
My first commercial flight was in a DC-3. I was fourteen, it was 1955, and I needed to get back to Seattle from Victoria where my father and I had tried to get a spot on the US Olympics team, with our 29-foot Dragon Class sloop. The flight from Sidney (BC) to Seattle was about an hour, I guess, and I'll never forget the view.

Has anybody here had a first commercial flight on an older aircraft?

Willy
03-20-2011, 06:25 AM
Has anybody here had a first commercial flight on an older aircraft?

Well I'm probably a pup here, but my first commercial flight was at the age of six, in 1956. Amsterdam to New York via Gander, Nfld.
The aircraft was a Lockheed Super Constellation.
In addition to the four, Wright R3350 18cyl. radials, it also was the first pressurized airliner.
The sound of those radials and the ones from the Stearman crop dusters I remember seeing in the late 50's while growing up in the San Joaquin Valley of California, is what still stirs some fond memories.

Maybe not an "older" aircraft...but it still used propellers the way God intended.;)

Rustybolt
03-20-2011, 09:24 AM
When my older brother had his A&P lisense for only two or three years, he got a job at Butler Aviation at O'hare Airport. One of his jobs was to check the DC 3 twice a day after its run to Flint Michigan. It seems the frames for some automobile was made in a plant in Chicago and twice a day loaded onto the DC 3 and flown to detroit.
When I first saw the plane it was nighttime and my brother was shining his flaslight on the ramp. When i asked what he was looking for he answered fresh oil. If there was oil on the ramp that meant that the engine was getting oil.
When he showed his light on the plane it looked like somebody had beaten the the thing from the inside with a bag of nickles, or in this case car frames.
We went in the cargo door which was being held on with, I swear, modified gate hinges.
In the cockpit the instrument panel had a lot of holes in it where the instruments were missing. I don't know which ones. Cockpit lighting was two flashlights taped to the ceiling above the pilots and copilots seats.
The funniest thing was the alarm clock taped to the top of the instrument panel.
my brother told me that one the plane was over Lake Michigan the pilot engaged the autopilot and took a nap. The clock was to wake him up over Michigan.
I'm sure he was pulling my leg.
Right?

bborr01
03-20-2011, 10:02 AM
Has anybody here had a first commercial flight on an older aircraft?
Not my first, but my second.

My first was in a Cessna 150? Two seater, probably about 1968.

Then around 1972, I took my first commercial flight. I went from Aberdeen, South Dakota to Minneapolis. Don't know what kind of plane it was except that it was relatively small, held 20 or 30 passengers. Twin engine prop plane.

The part that I remember distinctly was smoke coming up out of the floor once we were cruising. No idea what the smoke was from but it was nerve wracking.

Brian

John R
03-20-2011, 10:19 AM
First flight was Jacksonville to Tampa on a twin engine, twin tail ,tail dragger.
About 1948. I think it was a Lockeed but not sure. There was no security in those days so I was invited to the cockpit and actually flew the plane with some left and right turns. I remember the wing spar came right through the cabin and you had to step over it to go forward. Later I had many flights in DC3 's flown by Southern and Trans Texas. On flights from the Mississippi coast to Memphis you could order hamburgers and beer to be waiting for you at the next landing.
I learned to fly in the 60's in Cessna 150 and 172 and owned a Piper J3 . Finally I actually flew a B-17.
Good luck all,
John R

tmc_31
03-20-2011, 12:23 PM
My first flight was on a DC-6 from San Francisco to Okinawa in 1958. I was 6 years old. The leg from SF to Hawaii was at night and I remember looking out the window and thinking the wing was on fire. On the trip over we landed on Hawaii, Guam, Wake Island, the Philippines, Japan and finally Okinawa (not necessarily in that order, I was only 6 you know). We spent 3 years on Okinawa before coming home on an old troop ship converted to passenger use (the USS General Mann). About 3 days into the 30 day passage home I was sure missing that DC-6:(. One highlight of the trip back, was landing in the port of Yokohama and seeing the hospital where I was born from the deck of our ship:D .

Tim

gwilson
03-20-2011, 03:58 PM
I lived in Alaska for 6 years. We flew on Alaska Airlines- Airways?) up to Sitka on old Grumman Gray Goose twin engine ex Navy sea planes. they could nearly shake your teeth out. They flew pretty low,and hit numerous air pockets. The plane would seem to drop several feet,and hit the bottom of the pocket with a terrific CLANG!!!! I was entering the 4th. grade,and got very airsick!!!

Coming down to Seattle in 1957,we flew a Constellation. A MUCH smoother plane.

jdunmyer
03-20-2011, 08:47 PM
My first commercial flight was in 1961, on the Island Airlines. Left Catawba (I think it was) on a Ford TriMotor for MiddleBass Island in Lake Erie.

Started flying a LOT in about 1968, some flights were still DC-6's. My wife & I flew back and forth to her home in Mass. in the early 1960's, and those planes were DC-6's also, IIRC.

Oldbrock
03-20-2011, 09:02 PM
I got my pilot's licence so long ago that you could buy multi instruction on a DC3 for $100 an hour.

sansbury
03-20-2011, 09:55 PM
The funniest thing was the alarm clock taped to the top of the instrument panel. my brother told me that one the plane was over Lake Michigan the pilot engaged the autopilot and took a nap.

You use timers on instrument approaches, to determine when to start descending. Usually it's a stopwatch you use. Kitchen timers work great.

Lew Hartswick
03-20-2011, 09:56 PM
My first commercial flight was in a DC-3. I was fourteen, it was 1955, Me too. It was Allegheny Airlines from Black Moshannon Airport in
Centre Co PA to Newark NJ Not sure of the year but it was about
that vintage, could have been a year or so earlier. There was one
earlier in a C46 from State College (Sherm Lutz's field) to
Indiantown Gap and back for the PA Air National Guard. :-) circa.
1951, Not exactly "Commercial" comforts. :-)

Oh! did the europe trip and back several times in DC6's too Almost forgot
that. Some of it I'd like to forget. :-)
...Lew...

Bob Fisher
03-20-2011, 10:10 PM
I think everybody here knows that the Ford trimotor didn't have "rotary" engines. They know the sound I meant. Bob Fisher.

Lew Hartswick
03-20-2011, 10:26 PM
I think everybody here knows that the Ford trimotor didn't have "rotary" engines. They know the sound I meant. Bob Fisher.
Yea BUT there is the old, " I don't know what you MEAN only what you SAID". :-)
...lew... That is how a lot of "mis-understandings" start.

gunbuilder
03-20-2011, 11:22 PM
Not my first, but my second.

My first was in a Cessna 150? Two seater, probably about 1968.

Then around 1972, I took my first commercial flight. I went from Aberdeen, South Dakota to Minneapolis. Don't know what kind of plane it was except that it was relatively small, held 20 or 30 passengers. Twin engine prop plane.

The part that I remember distinctly was smoke coming up out of the floor once we were cruising. No idea what the smoke was from but it was nerve wracking.

Brian
Brian,
I can't speak for the smoke but at that time or before then I think North Central Airlines was flying the Convair 580. Also called Herman the ruptured duck. The pictures on Google don't show the props very well, but they had a wide blade in the them, at least it looked wide to me at the time.

Thanks,
Paul

TGTool
03-20-2011, 11:59 PM
Whatever happened to the "no pictures, it didn't happen"?

I'm not sure this was the first, but it was somewhere around there, and I'm not sure this thing predated the DC3 but it does have that steampunk look that suggests antiquity if it doesn't really have it.

And, that may or may not be the pilot on top doing a preflight. How do you say "Hand me up another bucket?" in pidgin.

http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f244/TGTool/Jos109.jpg

Guido
03-21-2011, 12:07 AM
Flew on S.A.F.E. Airways, (Southwest Air Fast Express), Mr. Halliburton's airline in the early 60's (Gulfstream). First plane, Ford Tri number 39 was put into service late 20's, to transport Mr. Skelly, Mr. Phillip and other oil patch shareholders around the southwest.

Mail routes were bid only to small airlines, with American Airways buying Halliburton's Ford Tris for their mail routes. Beginning of American Airlines.

Halliburton, then interested in aluminum and anodizing, and the future of air transport, cranked up his aluminum suitcase business, now evolved into Zero Halliburton Luggage. (People can jump a lot further with a pillow tied to their bottom.)

Ford Tri No. 39 went on to work, from Alaska to Brazil, ending up as a living quarters in Mexico. American resurected the plane which now hangs in the National Air & Space Museum. More poop at Google.

--G

Evan
03-21-2011, 12:31 AM
I flew to Denmark on my mother's lap in 1950 in a DC3. I was one year old so I don't recall the flight but it took 2 days since it was from San Francisco to Copenhagen.

Radial engines are something we hear every year in the summer. When we first moved here thay were still flying the Douglas A-26 Invader converted to water bombing duty. They were very fast with a top speed of 355 knots. They took those out of service in the early 80's as they were replaced by the Grumman Tracker/FireCats. Butt ugly airplane but it has radials so it sounds nice. They are still flying and so is the DC6 water bomber, as far as I know.

There is also the pair of Martin Mars water bombers with 4 radials each. I have not had the pleasure of hearing those. Nothing beats a piston engine for instant power when you throttle up. That's why they are still using them. Turbines take much longer to deliver full power as they spool up and that can mean life or death in water bombing.

The Artful Bodger
03-21-2011, 12:54 AM
Whatever happened to the "no pictures, it didn't happen"?

I'm not sure this was the first, but it was somewhere around there, and I'm not sure this thing predated the DC3 but it does have that steampunk look that suggests antiquity if it doesn't really have it.

And, that may or may not be the pilot on top doing a preflight. How do you say "Hand me up another bucket?" in pidgin.




That aircraft is a B170, Bristol Freighter, also known as a Briston Frightener. A very common freighter in the British Commonwealth countries until quite recently. Post WWII I think so that is later than the DC3. Twin Bristol sleeve valve engines and a great workhorse. On some services you could take you car along too.

The guy on top of the wing is likely pouring oil in as the sleeve valve engines seemed to realy enjoy the stuff.

The Artful Bodger
03-21-2011, 01:02 AM
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5248/5286111873_bae0a03480.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/25239206@N06/5286111873/)
IL18 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/25239206@N06/5286111873/) by aardvark_akubra (http://www.flickr.com/people/25239206@N06/), on Flickr

North Korean IL18, we flew on that from Beijing to Pyongyang in 1999. A very smooth flight which was fortunate as they had panes of glass stacked in the cabin with us!


http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5209/5288942623_ba51bb7284.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/25239206@N06/5288942623/)
P1010009 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/25239206@N06/5288942623/) by aardvark_akubra (http://www.flickr.com/people/25239206@N06/), on Flickr

Our ride to Baghdad, June 2003 if I recall the date correctly. An Ukranian registered Soviet era freighter. I have no idea who the operator was and I dont think we paid for a ticket. It could have been one of Viktor Bouts' ships.

An inside view in the passenger compartment:-
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5202/5288942179_530a0817ff.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/25239206@N06/5288942179/)
P1010005 (http://www.flickr.com/photos/25239206@N06/5288942179/) by aardvark_akubra (http://www.flickr.com/people/25239206@N06/), on Flickr

No seat back tray tables on there and if you get tired there are bunks overhead.

franco
03-21-2011, 04:42 AM
First commercial flight was in an Avro Anson about 1947. Twin 345 HP Armstrong Siddely manual start Cheetah 9 radials, 9 seats I think, and a pilot's delight - 140 turns of the crank manual undercarriage retraction. These first flew in 1935 and were used mainly as navigational trainers by several airforces in WW2, after which many were converted for civilian use in regional feeder airlines. I did a number of trips in school vacations to visit relatives in these with East West Airlines in New South Wales, Australia in the 1940s.

The one I've always regretted though was the one I did not take. About 1936 or early 1937 my father took me out to the field which is now Sydney Airport where an operator was running joy flights over Sydney Harbour Bridge at ten shillings a time in an Avro 10, a licence built Fokker trimotor of twenties vintage. At age three one look was enough - no way in the world was I going to get into that thing!

franco

.RC.
03-21-2011, 05:32 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LyUJIC6I7ic

Crank up the volume!

That sounds like the noise we used to hear in the eighties/nineties by army planes flying high and very slow overhead.. I think they were caribou's.. You had to line them up with a tree to see if they were moving..

Greg Q
03-21-2011, 07:08 AM
That Iluyshin had the Soviet equivalent of R-R Darts. Real airplanes had Wright or P & W power. I cannot hear a radial-engined aircraft fly overhead and not be overwhelmed with nostalgia.

GQ

DC-3, DC-4,CV-440, C-45/ BE-18, B-17, C-46, Ford Tri-Motor, Stinson Reliant.
B-737, B-747

J Tiers
03-21-2011, 08:53 AM
Yah... Flew Minneapolis to Chicago on a DC3 when I was too young to know about it..... didn't fly anywhere again until we flew Icelandic on a turboprop to Reykjavik in the 1960s.

Anyone's first fliught on a DC2 or a Boeing 247?

BTW, the Super Connie was NOT the first pressurized aircraft...... Boeing had one pre-war. Boeing model 307

TGTool
03-21-2011, 10:13 AM
That aircraft is a B170, Bristol Freighter, also known as a Briston Frightener. A very common freighter in the British Commonwealth countries until quite recently. Post WWII I think so that is later than the DC3. Twin Bristol sleeve valve engines and a great workhorse. On some services you could take you car along too.

The guy on top of the wing is likely pouring oil in as the sleeve valve engines seemed to realy enjoy the stuff.

Thank you, very interesting. Sleeve valve? I had no idea, but then there was a lot I didn't know back then. Lots I still don't. I haven't given up but I'm reconciled to never being able to get it all.

The next leg of that flight from Kano to Tripoli for refuel was at night, different plane, and I do remember watching the exhaust pipe glowing red hot. Probably also where I was indelibly imprinted with the unmistakable sound of multiple big radials at work.

38_Cal
03-21-2011, 10:32 AM
Navy Squadron I was in in '71-72 flew E-1B, Grumman Tracer (Willy Fudd). Had a big wing shaped radome on top, sort of looked like a UFO stealing a ride on an airplane! Had a few rides in them, from San Diego to Alameda and once to Denver in one that had the radome removed to convert it to a C-1 configuration, though still with the double tail of the E-1B.

David

biometrics
03-21-2011, 10:33 AM
Flew a couple of times while on active duty in the Army on a DC-3 (Ethiopian Airlines) from Addis Abbaba to Asmara (Eritrea) roundtrip... 1972-1973, and again in Turkey (Turk Hava Yolari Airline) from Sinop to Ankara, and Ankara to Istanbul roundtrip (1978)...

Really neat old aircraft!

RB211
03-21-2011, 01:25 PM
My first commercial flight I believe was on either a DC-9 or 727.
The oldest airplane I ever had a ride on was a PBY Catalina.
http://fc06.deviantart.net/fs14/i/2007/070/d/d/No_Submarines_in_Biscayne_Bay_by_BillH_Photo.jpg

The oldest airplane I ever flew, based on total time, and wear, probably a C210 from Flight Express, complete with smoking rivets on the wings. Near 30,000 hours.