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Danny Steel
04-03-2011, 02:57 PM
Hey all, My first post:) And I'm glade I found this site.

I have a lathe, that I haven't used all to much, And now I want to learn more about It.

I want to bore a 1-5/16" hole In a odd shape 3/4" thick plate

I first looked at my 4 jaw chuck, but when the jaws are closed tight, I wouldn't be able to drill through this plate.

So I dug deep, and I found my face plate, that I have never used, but I think It will hold this piece of plate, so I can drill and then bore to size.

Can you give me some tips on holding flat plate to the face plate?
I'm thinking that there maybe some dogs that slide through the FP slots
And hold It that way?

Thanks In Advance for any Info on this

Danny

Dr Stan
04-03-2011, 03:10 PM
First locate the center of the hole. You can simply do some layout and center punch it, drill a pilot hole with a drill press, or if accuracy is necessary drill & ream and hole on a mill.

Mount the face plate and use a center in the tailstock to locate the hole. Then using hold downs like one uses on a mill clamp the workpiece to the faceplate. If precise location is needed and you have drilled & reamed the hole use a test indicator to finish aligning the hole location using a mallet or a hammer & a block of wood to move the piece around before you finish tightening the clamps.

When you are drilling & boring the hole pay very close attention to your hold down studs/bolts so you do not accidentally run into them. Also watch your RPM's since the piece will not be balanced. Sometimes it is even necessary to bolt on a counter weight if the piece is too far off the lathe axis and causes excess vibration.

Danny Steel
04-03-2011, 03:19 PM
Ahh, ok, Its the hold down clamps that i'm missing, I don't have a mill.

Cant I make these hold down clamps.?

Thanks Dr, Stan

Dr Stan
04-03-2011, 04:01 PM
Ahh, ok, Its the hold down clamps that i'm missing, I don't have a mill.

Cant I make these hold down clamps.?

Thanks Dr, Stan

It would be much easier if you had a mill. You probably could make some that would do on a drill press, but they work a whole lot easier if they are slotted. Take a look at the web sites for industrial suppliers to get an idea of what they look like.

Danny Steel
04-03-2011, 04:05 PM
It would be much easier if you had a mill. You probably could make some that would do on a drill press, but they work a whole lot easier if they are slotted. Take a look at the web sites for industrial suppliers to get an idea of what they look like.

I had a look at Busy Bee, They have kits

I think I'm getting the bug......I was looking In the adds for a used mill:)

Thanks for the Info Stan

Danny

Al Messer
04-03-2011, 04:27 PM
Danny, if your Faceplate is slotted, you can use odd pieces of scrap with a hole drilled through them and bolts, nuts, and washers to hold your workpiece to the faceplate. Be sure and pad it out from the faceplate enough so that you don't run into the faceplate when boring out the hole. The outer ring of an old ball bearing is good for that. If you can, buy a copy of the "Amateur's Lathe" by Sparey as it is very helpful to a beginner and sows a lot of accessories you can make for yourself on the lathe. Hood luck!!

Al

rohart
04-03-2011, 04:48 PM
Danny, something like one third of your machining time in the early days will be spent cutting steel strip into sections and drilling two or three holes in each piece.

The pretty milled slots can come later. Just make sure that if you need an odd length of clamp you make two of each.

Depending on the size of your set up, get some allthread in 8 or 10mm, or 5/16 or 3/8, lots of nuts and washers.

Carriage bolts with the square half filed away will do for a first stab at T-bolts.

If the strip you choose bends, use thicker. If it doesn;t, think about thinner next time. 1" x 5/16" is a safe bet for starters for a 9" diameter plate.

You'll need spacer pieces with holes in too. Make sure the clamp bolt is closer to your work piece than it is to the spacer, so the effort goes into holding.

Some like to slot the end of the allthread length, some don't. Some buy clamping sets, some make them. My experience is sets try to make you do what they can do, not what you want to do.

And lastly, but most important, check for no obstructions before you start the lathe, and that includes the boring bar, and don't run an out of balance faceplate fast.

SGW
04-03-2011, 04:52 PM
The Sparey book is wonderful. The picture of him in shop coat and tie standing at his lathe is itself worth the price. But it IS a good book for a beginning lathe user.

A caution: after you get the faceplate set up, you may notice it is extremely out of balance. If you turn on your lathe at this point, at normal RPMs your lathe will do the hula. You will need to add counterweights to get the faceplate more or less in balance, and even then you will probably want to start at low RPMs to see how things go. And don't stand in line with the faceplate. If a clamp should come loose and a chunk of steel get thrown off, it's advisable not to be in the line of fire.

"After you get the faceplate set up...." Thanks to gravity, that can be a lot more difficult than it sounds and require at least three hand. At some point you may want to make a duplicate of your spindle nose and attach it to a bearing that you can hold in your vise. Then you can mount the faceplate horizontally to do setups. You'll want the bearing so you can turn the faceplate and use an indicator during setup.

Danny Steel
04-03-2011, 05:30 PM
I used some 1x 1/4 flat bar, drilled holes for the hold down bolts, And It worked fine.......I now have the hole, drilled, bored, And the part tacked on the end of a hyd cylinder:) ......Thanks for those tips guys, I do have many yrs of wood turning, and welding under my belt......But the lathe just sat there for years, and years.....I still don't know the proper way to set the tool for facing, or spindle turning, I'm close LOL:) , I turned a pin today with my first shinny finish, yesterday I was wondering whitch tool bit was left or right.......I now have the Interest to learn just a bit more about lathe work.

Danny

form_change
04-03-2011, 05:32 PM
Danny,
How big is the plate you are trying to bore and what diameter is your 4 jaw chuck? You may know this already but the jaws in a 4 jaw chuck are reversible so can hang onto odd shaped plates. By using the steps on reversed jaws you may be able to do the job on it.

Michael

darryl
04-03-2011, 05:37 PM
It helps to have a little box full of various lengths of bolts- plus washers, nuts, spacers, etc. I like to use 3/8 diameter hardware since that fits the slots in my faceplate well enough. Some of my spacers are just sections of steel pipe wide enough to span the slots and thus able to sit flush to the faceplate. Make a few of the same length- some of mine are about 3/8 long, which is enough to space a workpiece away from the faceplate to allow a cutting tool to clear the back side of the workpiece without hitting the faceplate. That's pretty much all the spacers are needed for.

You don't have to bolt through the workpiece- you can catch just the edge, but you have to shim up the other edge of the bolt head so it can go tight without cocking sideways. This shim can rest on the same spacer and if it's the same thickness as your workpiece then it works. Usually you'd use a washer under the bolt head to spread the clamping force a little further onto the workpiece, and further onto the shim opposite it at the same time.

There's not many basics involved here- centering the workpiece with the aid of a center mounted in the tailstock, spacing the workpiece away from the faceplate if you need the room to be able to bore through it, bolting with whatever method works that will not loosen by tilting sideways or slipping, and keeping the off-balance situation under control. This last item is controlled by rpm and by adding counterweights as and if needed.

You'll probably end up making lots of custom clamping jigs over time. That's part of the fun.

Danny Steel
04-03-2011, 05:41 PM
Danny,
How big is the plate you are trying to bore and what diameter is your 4 jaw chuck? You may know this already but the jaws in a 4 jaw chuck are reversible so can hang onto odd shaped plates. By using the steps on reversed jaws you may be able to do the job on it.

Michael

The plate Is 3x5" my 4 jaw chuck Is 6"

I tried to set It up In this chuck at first, But I could see that I would be drilling Into the chuck body....Its set up with the legs out

willmac
04-03-2011, 06:39 PM
When you use a faceplate, always, always,before you start, pull the faceplate round by hand (power off) with your tool in the cutting position and check for collisions with the part, bolts, cross slide etc. Also check that as you take your cut, the tool nor any other part of the lathe will not move into an interference position. The advice others have given about low rpms is also vital.

Dr Stan
04-03-2011, 07:32 PM
Another book you would find useful is South Bend's "How to Run a Lathe". It is in reprint and can be found on Ebay and other sites. You may also want to look at Lindsay's Technical Books http://www.lindsaybks.com/ and of course subscribing to the print edition of Home Shop Machinist (how's that for a plug George?)

darryl
04-03-2011, 08:21 PM
I don't think anyone has mentioned it yet, but for every set-up with shims, spacers, nuts and bolts, and other parts not to mention the workpiece itself, there's the possibility of something coming loose and flying off. Most stuff would follow in the plane of the faceplate, but it can hit stuff and carom off in any direction. It would be best to run through a 'what if' in your mind before powering up. The first thing to think about is not putting your face inline with the faceplate. Something else is how can you shut the machine off quickly without putting yourself at risk.

There's a lot of operations you can do on a lathe or mill that are normal, but somewhat dangerous, and you want to be able to remain cool if something happens. One thing I don't want to have to include in my 'what if' planning is the effect that something I'm doing might have on another person in the shop. Say I have a rather long piece chucked and can't support the outboard end- maybe because I need to machine right at that end or whatever. If that piece catches somehow and ends up flying out of the jaws, I don't want to see it sticking out of somebodies forehead. What you're doing on the faceplate would probably fall into that category. It's enough to have to worry about your own safety-

Most often where this gets me is at the table saw. If there's someone else there, I'll often suggest that they go into the other room while I make this cut. Eliminate the distractions, and be fresh and alert at your machinery.