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View Full Version : Tool Gloat - $1000 Hardinge TFB



KEJR
05-10-2011, 08:43 PM
This lathe isn't exactly pristine, but for $1000 in working order I think I made out OK.

http://i1120.photobucket.com/albums/l483/kenemmons/DSC06050Small.jpg


http://i1120.photobucket.com/albums/l483/kenemmons/DSC06052Small.jpg

http://i1120.photobucket.com/albums/l483/kenemmons/DSC06056Small.jpg

http://i1120.photobucket.com/albums/l483/kenemmons/DSC06057Small.jpg

A lot of the brown rusty looking color is mostly from the camera. It is more of a colored patina than any sort of deep pitted rust or anything like that.

I was amazed at even though it has a decent amount of miles everything still moves freely and just feel right. My crosslide is a little creaky on some spots, but I think it probably just needs a thorough cleaning and oiling. The bed has some telltale micro grooving in it that you can feel with your hand, but hopefully there are enough high spots to keep it working well enough.

This was one of those deals where it showed up on craigslist last night and I went down there first thing this morning and folks were already hounding the seller. I ended up hiring a flatbed tow truck to move it and it was expensive but worth every penny not to have to bust my back or risk my life using a inappropriate vehicle.

One funny thing is that the headstock says its a HLV, but it doesn't have the threading, so I'm fairly positive that makes it a TFB lathe instead.

I'll be scouring the web for hardinge HLV/TFB resources, but any pointers on things to check and/or maintenance tips would be appreciated.

It isn't perfect, but it sure beats an overpriced south bend lathe for the same price.

Thanks,
KEJR

Ken_Shea
05-10-2011, 09:33 PM
Hardinge are known to be a precision lathe and that one does not look beat up, should give you great service. The TFB lacks any threading capabilities but you can be looking for a die head or tail stock die holder, seems I saw a HSM made one in the "Shop made Tools" forum.

Were you fortunate to get a chuck with it?

KEJR
05-10-2011, 10:10 PM
YEah, it doesn't look too bad, needs some TLC and cleaning.

Nope, no chuck. I have a nice 5" adjust tru chuck, but no back plate. I'm finding that the backplates are expensive and hard to find for these lathes. $200 is alot for a hunk of cast iron or steel disc! It should be easy enough to make (I have access to other machines) but at this point I don't need another project. I might buy a 5C 4" chuck for now and can always use them on my 5C spindexer too.

I'm happy to get 5C capability since most of my work is < 1" dia anyway.

KEJR

Rustybolt
05-10-2011, 10:16 PM
As long as they used oil for cutting fluid those bearings last forever.
Congradulations. They are a pleasure to use.

EddyCurr
05-10-2011, 10:16 PM
What voltage does your machine require?

A trio of Hardinge machines came up at auction earllier this year,
but they were 460V, 575V or something else, as I recall.

.

tyrone shewlaces
05-10-2011, 11:05 PM
Join this Yahoo group:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hardinge-Lathe/

In the files section there is a lot of useful info. There might be a dimensioned drawing of the taper nose there maybe. It's a pretty easy mount to make since it's just a taper and a pin for engagement. Of course the accuracy of fit to the taper is the thing, but that can be done easy enough too with a little care.

Seems to be a fair amount of Hardinge taper stuff on eBay. Most of the time it's pretty pricey, but if you keep at it you can catch some good deals. I got a turret tailstock to fit the older Hardinge lathes (like mine) for about $200 once. Fits my bed and aligns to spindle centerline as perfect as I can measure. Hardinge stuff is made so well I'm sure that kind of fit and accuracy isn't uncommon.

KEJR
05-11-2011, 09:30 AM
What voltage does your machine require?

A trio of Hardinge machines came up at auction earllier this year,
but they were 460V, 575V or something else, as I recall.

.

Its 208/220V three phase. I'm hoping a phase converter will work since I have single phase 120V or 240V combined two phase power at my house. I'm sure this will be in the hardinge group mentioned previously.

THanks!
KEJR

KEJR
05-11-2011, 09:32 AM
As long as they used oil for cutting fluid those bearings last forever.
Congradulations. They are a pleasure to use.

Unfortunately the fluid is a milky looking water/oil based fluid. I'm going to purge that out with oil as soon as I can. Are there any particular bearings I should clean and oil given that they were running water based fluids?

KEJR

KEJR
05-11-2011, 09:36 AM
Join this Yahoo group:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Hardinge-Lathe/

In the files section there is a lot of useful info. There might be a dimensioned drawing of the taper nose there maybe. It's a pretty easy mount to make since it's just a taper and a pin for engagement. Of course the accuracy of fit to the taper is the thing, but that can be done easy enough too with a little care.

Seems to be a fair amount of Hardinge taper stuff on eBay. Most of the time it's pretty pricey, but if you keep at it you can catch some good deals. I got a turret tailstock to fit the older Hardinge lathes (like mine) for about $200 once. Fits my bed and aligns to spindle centerline as perfect as I can measure. Hardinge stuff is made so well I'm sure that kind of fit and accuracy isn't uncommon.

Thanks Tyrone. I will definitely look into the yahoo group as well as take a stab at making a backplate. I might try 4142 prehard instead of cast iron since cast iron is nasty to hog out. I have access to a lathe with a chuck on it for now. I think you can get an accurate taper with a dial indicator and some trig so it shouldn't be too bad.

Thanks!
KEJR