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twinenginekart
05-14-2011, 01:25 PM
what is a good spray to spray on tools and parts sitting in the shop to keep them from rusting?

thanks Jerry

SteveF
05-14-2011, 01:51 PM
For spray I use BoeShield T-9.

For non-spray I brush on LPS3.

Steve

Arcane
05-14-2011, 01:53 PM
I use Rust Check.

MichaelP
05-14-2011, 02:15 PM
LPS-2 (I spray it on)
LPS-3 for long term storage (brush on, as mentioned above)

twinenginekart
05-14-2011, 03:16 PM
thanks for info were is a good place to order online?
thanks Jerry

Yow Ling
05-14-2011, 04:46 PM
thanks for info were is a good place to order online?
thanks Jerry

internet would be the best place

SteveF
05-14-2011, 05:31 PM
www.mcmaster.com

spope14
05-14-2011, 05:43 PM
LPS 2, but I also make a mix of mineral spirits and hydraulic oil or WD40 and hydraulic oil.

Dr Stan
05-14-2011, 06:16 PM
LPS-2 (I spray it on)
LPS-3 for long term storage (brush on, as mentioned above)

2X on the LPS products. I purchase mine from Travers Tool, but you may want to compare prices with McMaster, MSC, Enco, and some of the other on-line stores.

justanengineer
05-14-2011, 09:08 PM
I like simple old WD40 myself. If something becomes rusty despite the WD40, its either time to sell, or time to find more uses for it. Regardless, the minutes or hours spent polishing is punishment for staying away so long.

rkepler
05-15-2011, 08:56 AM
I like simple old WD40 myself. If something becomes rusty despite the WD40, its either time to sell, or time to find more uses for it. Regardless, the minutes or hours spent polishing is punishment for staying away so long.

I've had a couple of gunsmiths say that WD40 is one of their favorite oils, not because they use it but because they get more business from it than for any other simple reason. It's not really a lubricant, any oil will do a better job. It's not a protectant, again any oil will work better. It's not much of anything other than a cleaner (and, I will admit, it does a nice job when cutting aluminum). It will gum things up if sprayed lightly and left to dry repeatedly.

In my shop I have various stages of rust protection. First is simple way and spindle oil - anything that gets that on a regular basis is protected. Instruments are regularly treated with instrument oil and are kept in areas kept slightly above exterior temperature with "GoldenRod" heaters (these are 12W heaters used to lower relative humidity in RV closets and such). After that it's Starrett M1, it's basically a kerosene with a light oil and waxy fraction. Anything with that on it is good for a year or so. For anything left alone longer than that I use LPS-3, it leaves a greasy/waxy coating that's proof against rust.

loose nut
05-15-2011, 08:59 AM
Starret M1 oil has lanolin in it. After the oil evaporates the lanolin coats the metal as a rust barrier, it works very well, even on mill table tops etc.

knedvecki
05-15-2011, 09:00 AM
DO NOT USE WD40!!!! It attracts water and your tools will rust. Just plain automatic transmission fluid will work. Marvel Mystery oil is good.

"Ashes to ashes. Dust to dust. If it wasn't for Fords, my tools would rust!"

MrSleepy
05-15-2011, 10:07 AM
I have an old Harrison L5 as my "dirty job lathe" which trys its best to rust up during the winter..
To stop any rust developing I usually give it a coat of diesel mixed with some way oil...which has stopped any rust occuring for the last 20 winters odd.

Rob

vpt
05-15-2011, 10:18 AM
I've been trying all kinds of stuff and lately I am liking this stuff. It stays where you spray it and covers for weeks and weeks without drying up. It does thicken up after spraying and I don't think it would work to good for hand tools and whatnot because they would be slimy. But for the lathe, mill, any bigger metal surfaces it works great and is like half the price of lp2-3.

http://wanscycle.com/web/sites/default/files/imagecache/product_full/liqiuid.jpg

Carld
05-15-2011, 10:22 AM
Quote from Wiki,

"WD-40 stands for "Water Displacement – 40th Attempt". Larsen was attempting to concoct a formula to prevent corrosion, by displacing the standing water that causes it. In the process, he arrived at a successful formula on his 40th attempt.[1] WD-40 is primarily composed of various hydrocarbons."

"WD-40 was first used by Convair to protect the outer skin of the Atlas missile from rust and corrosion.[1][2] The product first became commercially available on store shelves in San Diego in 1958.[1]"

knedvecki, I don't know where you have gotten the idea WD40 attracts water. I have never found that to be true. I have used it from the 1960's and have good results with it. It is NOT for long term protection from rust but for inside the shop it works fine.

When it dries it leaves a sticky film on the surface and it's not good to use in guns or locks or anything that won't tolerate gummy residue. It's a poor penetrating oil for rusty bolts, etc., but it's fast and cheap to spray on tools, mill tables and lathes.

MrSleepy
05-15-2011, 12:31 PM
Some years ago..

And I can't remember who...may have been lazlo...JT...Evan etc..

did an overwinter test of various rust preventers...and posted the results with pictures..

I've searched for a while..but cant find it...maybe someone else may have better luck..


Rob

SteveF
05-15-2011, 01:56 PM
It was JRouche. 2nd page.

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=37704


Carl - I guess it depends on how you define "long term protection". Brownells did a test where WD-40 did pretty well. The test was ended at 72 hours. JRouche did a test. The WD-40 "protection" didn't last 15 days.

I've used WD-40 in the past for rust protection. The "protected" items all rusted.

Steve

loose nut
05-15-2011, 03:29 PM
DO NOT USE WD40!!!! It attracts water and your tools will rust. Just plain automatic transmission fluid will work. Marvel Mystery oil is good.


It doesn't attract water, it acts as a barrier to it and actually works so good (in some conditions, not outdoors) that any water molecules on the surface of the metal get trapped under the WD40 and can't get out. This causes the rust.

Ron of Va
05-15-2011, 03:41 PM
The best corrosion protection testing was done at shooting site I visit from time to time. Lots of reading here, and answers.
http://www.6mmbr.com/corrosiontest.html

justanengineer
05-15-2011, 08:20 PM
Ive heard the controversy over WD40 before, but for me its cheap, easy, and effective. Its also much easier to clean off of painted surfaces than heavier oils. Not sure what results others have had, but on my tools its resprayed once every two months in WET northern NY winters. I MIST it heavily from a plastic pump spray bottle onto my lathe, not aerosol as it doesnt really mist but squirts and wont offer coverage. The shop in NY is uninsulated and very damp, and the only problems I have had is when I am lazy or busy and do not get out there. Like I said, if I dont get out there once in two months, I deserve the negative reinforcement.

Regarding WD and firearms, soldiers who like weapons that actually fire use WD. Heavier oils + dusty conditions = extreme malfunctions.

Carld
05-15-2011, 08:27 PM
SteveF, please reread my post. I DID NOT say it's for long term protection.

Quote from the post, "It is NOT for long term protection from rust but for inside the shop it works fine."

I guess since I didn't elaborate on the fact that I meant it is for SHORT TERM protection in the shop for not much longer than a week and you assumed I meant it would last forever inside the shop.

I am sorry for not being exact in my use of words to make myself completely understood.

Thruthefence
05-15-2011, 10:23 PM
Here's a little known LPS product that Cessna Citation mandates, (not recommends) for corrosion proofing the inside of axles & landing gear parts on their aircraft.

http://www.lpslabs.com/product_pg/corrosion_pg/Procyon.html

smells BAD IMHO.