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texjames
07-02-2011, 07:15 PM
On my Vertical Mill my boring head mounts to a B&S #9 with 1 1/2-18 threaded end.I am having difficulty coming up with a way to center my work with a test indicator and was thinking about an idea that popped in my head.I could screw off the boring head, screw on a cap that fits the bottom of my 1 1/2-18 threads and on the bottom of the cap a centered stud, hole with 1/4 inch to hold the test indicator with a set screw.One of my freinds wants me to take out my B&S arbor and put my collet arbor in with a 1/4 inch arbor but thats not easy on my old machine.What ya think? I am doing the same task over and over and this set up seems to be faster then swapping out arbors.example below...same jobs over and over.
http://i113.photobucket.com/albums/n225/texjames/7fe2d33a.jpg

Carld
07-02-2011, 07:34 PM
Why don't you make an adapter that clamps into one of the boring bar holes to mount the dial indicator on? Taking the head off and on isn't a good idea to me.

texjames
07-02-2011, 08:40 PM
Why don't you make an adapter that clamps into one of the boring bar holes to mount the dial indicator on? Taking the head off and on isn't a good idea to me.
I thought about that at first useing the center hole but wondered about getting the head centerd everytime as well.I guess i could indicate off the fixed part of the head the move the indicator to the movable part to get the head centerd then do the center hole with the test indicator.

Ryobiguy
07-02-2011, 08:43 PM
If it works, you might be able to put the indicator on a flexible arm with a mag base that sticks to the boring head.

-Matt

Toolguy
07-02-2011, 08:48 PM
It doesn't matter if the head is centered. The indicator is just like a boring bar. It's a single point tool. If you get the same reading all the way around, then you're centered. It's a comparative measurement rather than an absolute measurement. I agree with Carld.

texjames
07-02-2011, 08:57 PM
It doesn't matter if the head is centered. The indicator is just like a boring bar. It's a single point tool. If you get the same reading all the way around, then you're centered. It's a comparative measurement rather than an absolute measurement. I agree with Carld.
OK i guess i am overthinking it.I was thinking i need to be on the quill center axis to get the correct readings all the way around.My boring head has an adapter that will fit in the 1/2 inch center hole with a 3/8th center.If i could find a 3/8 with dovetail end i could do that i guess.I have a 1/4 inch and no way to connect that.

DATo
07-02-2011, 08:59 PM
+1 Carld

+1 Toolguy

+1 Ryobiguy

All good suggestions. No need to disassemble the boring head or swap arbors.

DICKEYBIRD
07-03-2011, 10:31 AM
Your mill is a lot bigger and more rigid than mine but a using the shortest available tool that will get to the bottom of the bore is a good habit to get into. It helps a lot in eliminating the dreaded chatter syndrome. Unless I'm missing something in the picture, that one's quite a bit longer than necessary.

Just sayin'....:)

ps: The head shown in that picture brings back a lot of memories. My 1st "real" job was working for a German family owned import auto repair shop from 1968 - 71 working on mostly VW's. I could do engine rebuilds & top end jobs in my sleep in those days.

Funny how times have changed. We got paid 50% of the $85.00 labor charge for an engine rebuild and thought it was great! No patch jobs either. Along with replacing all the usual internal engine hardware, we had to rebuild the carb, repl. generator & starter brushes, did our own head work with new exh. valves & guides, grind the seats, install block/cyl head stud inserts if needed, yada, yada yadad-nauseum. Of course, a gallon of gas for my '56 Chevy and a pack of Marlboros were both 25 cents each back then!:eek:

bborr01
07-03-2011, 01:19 PM
James,

Having done many, many setups like you are doing, I always just put my indicator in the spindle in a collet or on an arm that is in the collet and indicate the part. Then swap the boring head for the indicator.

It also helps if you have a mill with a digital readout so you can move the part out of the way to give you clearance to swap things around and still come back to the same location.

Hope this helps.

Brian

Paul Alciatore
07-03-2011, 03:36 PM
These are useful in situations like this. It fastens to the OD of the spindle, above the collet.

http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INPDFF?PMPAGE=402&PMCTLG=00

Look at the bottom of the page for Universal Holders.

texjames
07-03-2011, 09:24 PM
Your mill is a lot bigger and more rigid than mine but a using the shortest available tool that will get to the bottom of the bore is a good habit to get into. It helps a lot in eliminating the dreaded chatter syndrome. Unless I'm missing something in the picture, that one's quite a bit longer than necessary.

Just sayin'....:)

ps: The head shown in that picture brings back a lot of memories. My 1st "real" job was working for a German family owned import auto repair shop from 1968 - 71 working on mostly VW's. I could do engine rebuilds & top end jobs in my sleep in those days.

Funny how times have changed. We got paid 50% of the $85.00 labor charge for an engine rebuild and thought it was great! No patch jobs either. Along with replacing all the usual internal engine hardware, we had to rebuild the carb, repl. generator & starter brushes, did our own head work with new exh. valves & guides, grind the seats, install block/cyl head stud inserts if needed, yada, yada yadad-nauseum. Of course, a gallon of gas for my '56 Chevy and a pack of Marlboros were both 25 cents each back then!:eek:
I would love to find a shorter bar with more 3/4 then just whats in the boring head.being a newbie and so many boring bars to pick from at MCS and Enco its crazy.If you have any suggestions and maybe a link to a better boring bar and inserts that cut 90 degree bottom i'd really appreciate it.This little bar cut the bores in a magnesium engine case like butter but it was chattering at the bottom cut on the aluminum head at about 250 RPM and with lots of A9 fluid.I might could try to slow it down some more after i get my set up leveled out.Thanks

KEJR
07-04-2011, 07:43 PM
I bought one of those "clamp to the spindle" universal indicator holders but I am not too impressed with the one I have. It works though.

What I want to get is a baby Noga arm and mount it into a 3/4" round that I can hold in my spindle collet. I do everything with 3/4" shanks so I don't have to unscrew the collet.

At that point it is like other have said. Indicate your work, put in boring head, and you are good to go.

KEJR

gundog
07-04-2011, 08:44 PM
I use this one Enco ran it on sale a while back it works for me.

http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PARTPG=INLMKD&PMPXNO=952232&PMAKA=607-4907

John Stevenson
07-06-2011, 03:12 PM
Sorry to be late to the party bu had to look some bits and and get photo's.

I used to have the exact same problem and wanted to do the setup as quick as possible then swap to a boring tool, next two pics are staged shot centring up on a screw jack as it was handy :rolleyes:

http://www.stevenson-engineers.co.uk/files/boring%20head%20dti1.jpg

two more or less identical pieces in the picture, one is fitted to the boring head and the one on the vise is made to fit a screw in Clarkson collet.

The idea is that the bar is dog-legged so the stylus is on the centreline of the boring head.

The indicator is one made my Verdict but they seem to have disappeared these days. All apprentices had to buy these and they were stopped out of your wages, they cost something like 30 shillings at the time. They have a read span of 20 thou and being skeletal you can read these from any angle.

http://www.stevenson-engineers.co.uk/files/boring%20head%20dti2.jpg


Shot from 'tother side showing the pointer still at mid scale, in the first pic it's hard to see the pointer.

Couple of wipes round whilst adjusting the handles then replace the bent link with the boring bar and jobs a good un.