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bugbear
07-22-2011, 08:39 AM
Hi guys - an invader from another forum (OLDTOOLS list) here;

http://swingleydev.com/archive/faq.html

For the last 2 weeks we've been trying to identify a mystery tool. Between us we have quite a wide range of knowledge, hobbies and interests, but this one has stumped us.

3 member of the list have examples, and we found a further one on the net.

if anyone knows what this is, that would be truly great!

Here are the photos:

Bill Taggart:

http://tinyurl.com/634llm4
http://tinyurl.com/63cv6my

Joe M:

http://www.joesbucketorust.com/images/OTList/whatsit.JPG

"Tool Exchange" in Australia:

http://www.toolexchange.com.au/imagesUSERS/eng5970.jpg


James Thomson:

Picassa link (https://picasaweb.google.com/oldmillrat/MysteryTool?authkey=Gv1sRgCNy5hraH_7-Tag#)

BugBear

Carld
07-22-2011, 08:44 AM
Hole transfer punches for a specific part??????:confused:

EDIT: specific meaning diameter of the holes marked off in various positions around the circumference range of the tool. Sorry about not being very specific about what I meant.

philbur
07-22-2011, 08:57 AM
The upper tool in the first two pictures is called a tape measure, it use to determining the size of objects.:cool:

Phil:)

bugbear
07-22-2011, 09:08 AM
I should add; the guys on OLDTOOLS have put a lot of effort into this, and failed. Amongst other things several big catalogues from various trades (metalwork, woodwork, leatherwork, horology, metrology, jewellery) have been read page-by-page.

Nothing.

We need more/wider expertise. Hence my trip over here.

Whatever this (expletive deleted) thing is, it's not obvious or common.

BugBear

garagemark
07-22-2011, 09:13 AM
What were some of the ideas from your people?

The fact that there are more than one copy of them would seem to indicate that it is more common than special.

T.Hoffman
07-22-2011, 09:24 AM
All three pointed tips are to the same plane?

Some kind of hole-orientation transfer guage?

Evan
07-22-2011, 10:09 AM
It looks like a sheet metal or tin smith's tool to me. It takes two reference points to locate a third so it can be used to locate holes. The points of the tool are made different lengths so that the all end up in the same plane. That tool could also be handy for scribing a line a constant distance from an edge.

A.K. Boomer
07-22-2011, 10:17 AM
The points are very low degree angle for scribing - still could be - very strange but as a mechanic I could see it being some kind of guide tool for either adjusting linkages or keeping track of where they were before disassembly - watch - you'll find out it was some kind of linkage adjust tool for a certain model typewriter that was only built for a couple years back in the 1800's:p


Whatever it is --- all points are progressive in correspondence to the thickness of the guide arms and the way they are "stacked" Sooooooooo - the thing was designed to be used on something of a singular level. (flat)

3jaw
07-22-2011, 10:22 AM
It's called a "Preacher". It is used by clockmakers to locate a pivot hole in a clock plate that is being repaired by plugging and redrilling. One of the points is placed in the original hole before the hole is plugged and the other two are used to make indentations in the plate. Once the hole has been plugged, the two points are again placed in the indentations and the third point will make an indentation in the same location as the original hole. Of course it can be used for more than just clocks as many of the posters have already suggested.

Here is a link to a discussion about how they were used along with pictures of shop made preachers:

http://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?t=24797&highlight=preacher

Post #34 shows pictures of the exact object the OP shows in his first post.

You have to register to see the pictures so I have included them here if you don't want to register.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0703/ggordon/Watches/f324b29c.jpg

I just noticed that the one pictured has four points instead of three!
(http://mb.nawcc.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=25349&d=1230251291)

vpt
07-22-2011, 10:56 AM
I agree that it looks like a great little hole transfer tool.

gary350
07-22-2011, 11:05 AM
It's called a "Preacher". It is used by clockmakers to locate a pivot hole in a clock plate that is being repaired by plugging and redrilling. One of the points is placed in the original hole before the hole is plugged and the other two are used to make indentations in the plate. Once the hole has been plugged, the two points are again placed in the indentations and the third point will make an indentation in the same location as the original hole. Of course it can be used for more than just clocks as many of the posters have already suggested.

Here is a link to a discussion about how they were used along with pictures of shop made preachers:

http://mb.nawcc.org/showthread.php?t=24797&highlight=preacher

Post #34 shows pictures of the exact object the OP shows in his first post.

You have to register to see the pictures so I have included them here if you don't want to register.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0703/ggordon/Watches/f324b29c.jpg

I just noticed that the one pictured has four points instead of three!
(http://mb.nawcc.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=25349&d=1230251291)


This forum is very educational. My Grandfather had one of these I bet knew what it was for, he died in 1972.

Black_Moons
07-22-2011, 11:52 AM
I don't know what it is, but whatever it is, I want one, im sure I can find a use for it.. :P

Scottike
07-22-2011, 12:39 PM
Now that looks like a cool little tool! I can see using something like that to copy a hole pattern, or locate hole(s) from reference(s) on multiple pieces. Simple, easy to use, versitile, and it could be a real time saver!

dp
07-22-2011, 02:41 PM
It looks like it would be very useful to transfer locations to/from templates in addition to remastering an existing piece of work. I wonder about the uses the hole in the nut might have, too.

Black_Moons
07-22-2011, 02:46 PM
I thought imedately it would be great for bolt circles.

Put first pin in the 'center' of the circle (Centerpunch mark if needed), second in your first hole, then the 3rd pin if set just right would end up where the next hole should be. tap with a hammer to make a punchmark, move 2nd pin into 3rd pin hole. When you get to the end, idealy the 3rd pin should end up in the 1st hole. If not adjust the tool.

I guess adjustment would be the big pain here, but if you had to do more then 1 part, or adjusted it to an existing part, you could lay out an accurate bolt circle in seconds.

I bet if you put a protractor on it to measure the angle beween the 2nd and 3rd pin with the 1st pin as the pivot point, you could set it up pertty quickly and only end up with 1~ degree error per hole in the circle, maybe less if the protractor scale is very large and has vineer scale on it

taydin
07-22-2011, 02:51 PM
a tool like that would also work to drill a series of holes at the perimeter of a rectangular piece. You drill the first hole, then you adjust the tool so that one pin goes into the first hole, the second pin touches the edge of the workpiece and the third pin is tapped with a hammer and marks the next hole. Then drill the next hole and repeat the process...