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paddleman
08-01-2011, 06:51 PM
I saw no real place to introduce oneself here, at least it wasn't obvious so I slapped down my own mat, I've scrubbed the mud off. Here I is; I am Theo, AKA paddleman; my ultimate goal is to actually have a neat shop. :o As far as working metal, I've done not much, yet. My machinery is best described as tiny, a Taig. I had my doubts that it could handle metal, no problem turning wood, tried a chunk of old weathered (very dark, thought it was bronze) and it turned a nice bright yellow, I think it's brass! It did a bang up job :) on a chunk of "free-machining" steel, teaching me to wear an apron. the swarf small as it is, still warm when it lands on my knees! Other than a neat shop I also hope to turn out a steam engine. One way or 'nother, this ole Dutch/Canadian would like to keep a brain exercised by larnin' something new.
sez Theo.

DFMiller
08-01-2011, 07:15 PM
Welcome,
Its always good to list your geographic location in your user profile so we can give you the best advice. Telling you to go to Arc Eurotrade for a part might not be that useful if you live by KBC tools in Windsor.

Dave

Black_Moons
08-01-2011, 07:36 PM
DFMiller: No it would'nt change a thing, I would still recommend he go to Arc Eurotrade insted. :)

Don't mind me, Im young and cranky and that was an inside joke!
Welcome to the forum! Feel free to post pictures of projects, gloats of ill (Cheap) be gotten tools and materials, Questions, And pictures of shiny bridgeports for John! (Sorry, Another inside joke, You'll get them all someday!)

paddleman
08-01-2011, 07:51 PM
Dave:
To be slightly more exact I live out "in the sticks" in an area known as Huronia, Ontario, off Georgian Bay, Only recently I found "Metal Supermarket", has an outlet in Barrie, the nearest (relatively) large city. I had thoughts to get a few bars of different metals to practice on. So far only that chunk of brass and that bit of steel. Have heard some alloys can be a real bear to cut. I am wondering how cast iron cuts/turns. Thanks for letting me aboard
Theo.

SGW
08-01-2011, 08:03 PM
It depends on the cast iron. The continuous-cast bars you can buy are beautiful to work with. On the other hand, a random casting may:
1. Have sand embedded in the surface if it was cast in a sand mold;
2. Have a very hard skin because of rapid cooling near the surface;
3. Have a certain amount of slag and crud mixed into it if the foundry wasn't paying enough attention to skimming or if they were scraping the bottom of the crucible to get enough iron for that last part.

Old cast iron window weights often have all those problems and more, for example. Unless you are really lucky, window weights are usually a terrible source of raw material.

Usually, these days iron castings tend to be pretty good, I think, and problems 1 and 2 are correctable by cleaning the surface and annealing the casting.

Black_Moons
08-01-2011, 09:08 PM
Dave:
To be slightly more exact I live out "in the sticks" in an area known as Huronia, Ontario, off Georgian Bay, Only recently I found "Metal Supermarket", has an outlet in Barrie, the nearest (relatively) large city. I had thoughts to get a few bars of different metals to practice on. So far only that chunk of brass and that bit of steel. Have heard some alloys can be a real bear to cut. I am wondering how cast iron cuts/turns. Thanks for letting me aboard
Theo.

Cool another canadian. :)
If you add it to your actual profile it makes it easyer for future referance.

Get some aluminum! its a dream to work with. Shiny. Does not rust/tarnish, Easy to get a good finish on if you use lube (Without lube it can build up on your cutter and do nasty stuff to the finish as you try and cut aluminum with another chunk of aluminum)

Cast iron turns into DUST as you cut it, but should leave a good finish when done with care. This dust is abrasive and best kept off the lathe (Newspapers can help collect most of it) from getting on the ways, the rest can be wiped off ASAP)

Moreso, this dust will go everywhere and be a big, black mess.

Bob Ford
08-02-2011, 12:39 AM
Welcome,

Steel 12L14 is the easiest to turn with a good finish.
1018 is soft, but tends to tear and makes it tougher to get a good finish.
1144 stressproof turns nice and has a reasonable finish and is stronger.
4140 turns and finishes well.

They all will require sharp tools set at center height. Look up Sherline's website good information. http://www.sherline.com/

Bob

Teenage_Machinist
08-02-2011, 01:09 AM
THe main metal I use is 1/4, 5/8, and 3/4 6061 Al, and 12L14 steel. If available at hardware stores, gigantic Grade 5 or Grade 8 bolts can be a quick source for a small amount of a higher carbon, pre-hard steel. Cast Iron is very annoying but machines nicely. I hate 1018. Getting a good finish is hard, I just don;t find it worth the trouble when buying new stock. Not that it's a bad metal, it's just so troublesome when you can get 12L14.

Aluminum is wonderful, instant good finish. Only problem is super stringy chips. You want 6061 alloy, the higher the T-number, the harder. (which does not affect machining negatively, usually).

Brass: very expensive, good for bushings, useful because screw threads will stand up better than in aluminum yet still super easy to machine. you'll probably want, alloy 360 but beware of lead.

DFMiller
08-02-2011, 02:13 AM
Theo,
BM is correct, I have actually ordered stuff from Arc and got it faster than ordering from KBC. ;-)

I grew up in Sarnia so I know the area you are from. You should have lots of time in the in the winter to work.

There are other board members in your area. Brian R for sure.

Getting material that you know the material specs is a good bet when you are starting.
Some material is really hard to work with.

Good luck.
And fill in your location in your profile. If you need help ask and someone will help you out.
Dave

Mcgyver
08-02-2011, 08:06 AM
Welcome to the board. Where I grew up, lots of Dutch farmers, they pronounced it TAY-o.....are you TH EE-o or TAY-o? :)


Cast iron turns into DUST as you cut it, but should leave a good finish when done with care. This dust is abrasive and best kept off the lathe.

mostly an old machinists wives tale....its the sand present in the out layer of sand castings which is abrasive and bad for machines, but once through it it is fine. The the scale on durabar isn't good for things, true, but that's the same as hot rolled or other scale...once into the material its fine, there is nothing abrasive about the material and durabar for instance is a treat to machine

Oldbrock
08-02-2011, 10:23 PM
You came to the right place. Lots of knowledgeable people here. There is always someone who can answer a machining question here, some will give you flack but then we are a diverse bunch and you have to take the help and ingore the grouches. They just try to get one wound up. Enjoy the machining and learning the skills. Peter

paddleman
08-04-2011, 04:32 PM
I been anglicised so pronounce "THEE-OH" and I am aware "TAY-OH" is Dutch pronunciation, not that anyone can recognize any accent from a keyboard and not that I even have any Dutch accent. And thanks to all for advice on what material to use and to be careful with. So how do I add to/upgrade my profile, not very intuitive here unless I am missing/not seeing something?
sez Theo

DFMiller
08-04-2011, 04:39 PM
Theo
There is a tab on banner above adverts that is titled UserCP Leftmost brown banner
Click on that.
Then on left there is a link called edit profile.
That should get you there.
I can post some pictures if you need more help.
Dave