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View Full Version : See any problems with the Smithsonian's Department of Innovation logo?



planeman
08-09-2011, 10:58 AM
Take a look . . . .

http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/ideas/2011/07/welcome-to-the-department-of-innovation/

Planeman

goose
08-09-2011, 11:08 AM
Yes, it's lame and unimaginative.

mooney1el
08-09-2011, 11:18 AM
The "gears" are locked. Back when GM split into CPC-BOC, someone suggested a three meshed gear logo for BOC (Buick, Oldsmobile, Cadillac) and management almost bought into it.

ikdor
08-09-2011, 11:18 AM
The gear teeth are not generated?:D

Igor

hornluv
08-09-2011, 11:19 AM
The square teeth of those gears probably won't work all that well.

ckelloug
08-09-2011, 11:19 AM
The gears won't turn. A similar logo was also used as the logo for a DOD entity designed to encourage cooperation between DOD entities. It seems rather apropos given the complete and utter failure of our government recently.

JoeFin
08-09-2011, 11:25 AM
So some right wing blog posted a link to the blog and sent dozens "Hate Peddlers" over to trash on a Smithsonian Website


I followed a link from Michelle Malkin’s website thinking that it could not possibly be true that Smithsonian had put up a logo showing gears that won’t turn as a symbol of innovation. How very wrong I was.

The only question is why this is posted here where folks (with the exception of a few crazys) generally accept science and engineering and the Webmaster has a prohibition against "Political Threads"

ckelloug
08-09-2011, 11:32 AM
I find the pattern of use of logos with locked gears in government organization interesting. It either marks a satirical view on the part of the graphic designers or a complete and utter non-understanding of technology on the part of the masses, or both. Either way, it's pretty funny. I wouldn't have known about the more political nature of the posting here if you hadn't mentioned it, JoeFin, as I don't read that many other groups.

Carld
08-09-2011, 11:34 AM
The two small gears will turn when the large gear is turned. They are not locked. I guess it's a good logo for the start of the industrial revolution but it's a little short on innovation.

I don't see a problem with this thread.

ckelloug
08-09-2011, 11:40 AM
Carl's right that they're not actually locked. If they were a little closer together then they would be but I missed seeing that.

JoeFin
08-09-2011, 11:42 AM
I come here to read and when directed to the link I read, and when I found the above quotation in amongst the comments I merely stated the obvious.

Mind you the "Graphic" was probably designed by a "Graphics Artist" or "Web Designer" with no expertise in any thing mechanical or mechanical engineering for that matter and "Geared Towards" (pun intended) the general public who understand gear geometry about as well as the inventors of the wheel. I don't find it strange at all it is not a working 3D Cam generated drawing.

Actually from a Graphic Designer's point of view the logo is very good. Remember a logo needs to convey the same message when it is 30' x 30' or when 1.5cm x 1.5cm.

Scottike
08-09-2011, 11:48 AM
True, they're not locked. They just run around in circles all day, good logo for a government entity.

JoeFin
08-09-2011, 11:58 AM
Found this site linked in the Smithsonian's Blog role that a lot of members here would probably find very interesting and or inspirational

http://the99percent.com/

JCHannum
08-09-2011, 12:08 PM
This is the logo as it was originally presented;

http://i320.photobucket.com/albums/nn351/jchannum/untitled.jpg

The gears were locked and would not turn. It appears that the two lower gears have subsequently been separated. Wonder what that cost us?

JoeFin
08-09-2011, 12:15 PM
The gears were locked and would not turn. It appears that the two lower gears have subsequently been separated. Wonder what that cost us?

A fraction of what Austerity measures just cost your 401K

dp
08-09-2011, 12:17 PM
They modified the image so the cogs on all three wheels are not in mesh at the same time. It went from being a shaft lock to a reverse tumbler.

goose
08-09-2011, 12:20 PM
This is the logo as it was originally presented;

http://i320.photobucket.com/albums/nn351/jchannum/untitled.jpg

The gears were locked and would not turn. It appears that the two lower gears have subsequently been separated. Wonder what that cost us?


Thank you for finding that image, apparently it was fixed subsequently:

"Ed. note Thank you to everyone for your comments about our logo. We have since shifted the gears and switched in a new logo."

I don't really though see the big deal, the image doesn't show depth, and for all we know or imagine, one of gears is in a different plane than the others. Or, there's enough play in those toothy squares that maybe the two smaller gears rotate as a unit, allowing forward and reverse?

dp
08-09-2011, 12:26 PM
I don't really though see the big deal, the image doesn't show depth, and for all we know or imagine, one of gears is in a different plane than the others. Or, there's enough play in those toothy squares that maybe the two smaller gears rotate as a unit, allowing forward and reverse?

It isn't a gear set - it is a stylized logo. A logo needn't represent reality.

George Bulliss
08-09-2011, 12:36 PM
The only question is why this is posted here where folks (with the exception of a few crazys) generally accept science and engineering and the Webmaster has a prohibition against "Political Threads"

Yes, this is the type of thread that could quickly turn into a political debate and some of your posts make it all the more likely to happen.

George

Black_Moons
08-09-2011, 12:41 PM
I don't think the gear teeth are long enough to properly engage along an entire revolution.. In either logo :)

JoeFin
08-09-2011, 12:44 PM
Yes, this is the type of thread that could quickly turn into a political debate and some of your posts make it all the more likely to happen.

George

George - from the "link back" to Michelle's site in many of the comments on the Smithsonian site it already has

Sorry if my stating the obvious is offensive to any one. Only question being since when was a "Logo" required to conform to a "Working Drawing"

flylo
08-09-2011, 12:58 PM
I'm in Rotary & when the adopted a gear for their logo the engineers in the club had to tell them to put a keyway in the center bore of the logo.

JoeFin
08-09-2011, 01:21 PM
And the most popular Logo on the planet doesn't look any thing like a tennis shoe either

http://www.nikerepository.com/_/rsrc/1268053816418/nike-company-history/just-do-it.jpg?height=120&width=195

Rustybolt
08-09-2011, 01:31 PM
I don't know what those , but they're not gears. One of them is off center anyway.
This is what happens when you let bureaucrats design stuff.

lazlo
08-09-2011, 01:35 PM
I don't think the gear teeth are long enough to properly engage along an entire revolution.. In either logo :)

Those gears are clearly cut, and not hobbed :D

QSIMDO
08-09-2011, 01:42 PM
I was an Engineman in the Navy and the insignia for that rating is a single gear, obviously denoting no work done at all! ;)

Not true.
We worked our nuts...and bolts off quite regularly.

Mcgyver
08-09-2011, 01:51 PM
It isn't a gear set - it is a stylized logo. A logo needn't represent reality.

that is true, its value is in recognition and what it conveys . If the reaction it generates from this audience is groans and guffaws, its a failure. Are we the target audience? You'd think there'd be an implicit obligation for the centre of innovation not to trip over their own shoelaces, but the truth is I suspect neither those who designed the logo or the target audience knows or cares much about gears

HWooldridge
08-09-2011, 02:24 PM
Uh, folks...it's just a logo - period. It's not designed to function or carry loads and I doubt they spent a lot of time worrying about what a few engineers or machinists would think about it (although they at least did make the one modification). Sorry, but IMHO this is not worth getting worked up about.

Highpower
08-09-2011, 02:32 PM
I'm in Rotary & when the adopted a gear for their logo the engineers in the club had to tell them to put a keyway in the center bore of the logo.LOL. Looks like they are not alone. ;)

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/5/5d/International_Association_of_Machinist.JPG/175px-International_Association_of_Machinist.JPG

garagemark
08-09-2011, 03:21 PM
Jeeze, this thread took 5 minutes to read that I can never get back.....

CCWKen
08-09-2011, 07:17 PM
I missed it. It's been changed already. So go gripe about something else. :rolleyes:

"Ed. note Thank you to everyone for your comments about our logo. We have since shifted the gears and switched in a new logo."

Your Old Dog
08-10-2011, 09:03 AM
According to what I read just above, looks like a very useful thread to me. See that, we get things done even when we disagree or whiz off a lib.......did I really say that? NO GEORGE, DON'T LOCK IT UP! :D

Richard Wilson
08-10-2011, 11:49 AM
This is the logo as it was originally presented;

http://i320.photobucket.com/albums/nn351/jchannum/untitled.jpg

The gears were locked and would not turn. It appears that the two lower gears have subsequently been separated. Wonder what that cost us?

Could be my imagination, but I think in the latest version the pitch of the teeth on the larger gear is greater than the pitch on the smaller ones, so it might work now, but still not very well.

Richard

Mcostello
08-10-2011, 10:08 PM
Wonder how smooth square edge gear teeth would run? You would think that a proper and common picture would have been the first thought.

A.K. Boomer
08-11-2011, 02:15 AM
Don't we have better things to do? its a freakin logo for cri-sakes - it don't have to make no stinking sense - it get's the point across and that's all, geeeze:rolleyes:

Hopefuldave
08-11-2011, 04:10 AM
The same sort of problem as the 1997 UK 2 coin, which annoys me every time I find one in my loose change...

http://www.lhup.edu/~dsimanek/whoops.htm

And a "Don't be such a geek" comment on it ;)

http://aethelreadtheunread.wordpress.com/2011/04/16/your-painting-of-an-apples-rubbish-it-doesnt-taste-apple-y/

Dave H.
(Glad to be such a geek)