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View Full Version : Are You a Prisoner of your Job?



gary350
08-11-2011, 10:10 PM
When my Son graduated from college I told him, If you have anything fun you would like to do then you need to do it now before you get a job because once you get a job you become a prisoner. You are expected to be on time for work every day and you only get 1 week paid vacation after the first year. After 5 years most places give you 2 weeks paid vacation. Now is the time to travel and see the world before you get tied down to a full time job.

He took a job working at Yellowstone National Park during the summer. He gets 3 days off per week and hikes and explores the park with employee groups. They take a bus to a different place every time, hike all the trails in the park, canoe, camp, bond fires, etc. He gets free food, free place to live, free laundry, free transportation, free medical, it all comes out of his pay check so he does not actually get very much spending money but he is at Yellowstone having the time of his life.

Before that he worked the Appliation trail. Again every thing was free all he had to do was work at his own speed. If he felt tired one day he could lay out and rest. They have free food, satalite TV, game room, bond fires, music, hot showers, bathrooms, a place to live, lots of activities but no pay at all.

His job in Yellowstone ends with the tourist season last day of Sept. He has the option to stay on and drive a snow plow all winter or transfer to any National Park in the World. He is thinking he might transfer to Hawaii or maybe Australia.

After that he is thinking maybe Acadia National Park in Maine or maybe Glacier National Park or Death Valley or Grand Canyon or maybe Yellowstone again. I am glad he is having the time of his life.

After college I worked for 10 years, started 3 business and in 1985 I had enough. Sold it all and retired for 5 years. Then I returned to work as an employee, plant engineer in a factory. I retired again 2005 now I camp, hike, bicycle, travel, beach, play in my shop, garden, have fun. Life doesn't get any better than this. I am not rich but having fun is worth more than money. You only live once so don't waste it.

Carld
08-11-2011, 10:54 PM
Sounds like a good job if you can get it.

sasquatch
08-11-2011, 11:23 PM
Re: Workin for the man:

I have a couple of friends who live off grid in the bush ,both are now getting the old age pension,, anyway this spring was a big celebration of sorts for him, as this is the 40th year that he has worked for no one,,, always worked on his own at crafts, handyman, odd jobs etc.
When November comes, the car is parked, battery is taken out, and they stay in their place untill about April sometime.(They don,t come out.) Over the winter they crosscountry ski, do crafts to sell in the summer, tinker at projects, etc.
Grow and can most of their food to last the winter, heat with wood, and with both getting the old age pension, come april, they have spent nothing really, their pension goes automatically into their bank account, so come spring they got probably another $12,000.00 in the bank.
They got a system that works for them.

KiddZimaHater
08-11-2011, 11:25 PM
Wow Gary, you just hit the nail on the head.
I feel the same way.
I started working right out of school. Construction, roofing, labor, door-to-door sales, etc. before finally wandering into a machine shop.
I've been working non-stop for the past 23 years.
I thought it was all about money, money, money......
It's not.
These past 14 years I've been working 65 hour weeks. 6 to 6 Monday thru Friday + 5 hours on Saturday....... 14 years I've been doing this, week after week!
Until last month.:)
My boss gave me an ultimatum. He wanted even MORE hours outta me. Full day Saturday plus half days Sunday because THEY were back-logged. Take it or leave it!
So I quit, right there on the spot.....
I haven't felt this free since I was a kid.
I now work for myself, in my small shop, making parts here & there for a couple of customers.
I ain't rich. I'm not poor. The bills get paid. I have plenty to eat.
But I have FREEDOM and HAPPINESS.
And I now have time to play with my 7 year old daughter.
Life is what you make it. Enjoy!:)

tyrone shewlaces
08-12-2011, 12:37 AM
I think it's more about whether you like having roots or not. Every time I go on vacation I go off the beaten path. Usually in woodsy places and the like, but sometimes more urban. Anyway, I can't remember one at the moment where I wasn't offered a job "working" as a caretaker or something at a ranch or something like that where I would have to work a couple hours or so per day doing odd jobs, free room & board, use of vehicles or critters for transportation, and of course some spending money.

Those kind of jobs would be fun and actually not too bad for security. But for whatever reason I still prefer to have my own home base and some of those trappings, though my friends would likely say I'm definitely not the typical consumer type. I don't make a lot of money doing this job thing either, but I still get the chance to get off the beaten path now and then. But in my case I don't feel particularly imprisoned in my job either even though it carries a pretty fair bit of responsibility. I kind of like it a lot of the time, and a guy has to fill his days doing something after all.

Ramble over.

saltmine
08-12-2011, 12:44 AM
I must have been working the day after I was born. When I got out of high school, I decided to follow my Uncles and take up the trade of machinist. The US Army got in the way, and I spent the next 3 years learning how to kill people I didn't even know. Fortunately, I managed to stay stateside, because my younger brother was on Da Nang Air base in Vietnam. When I finally got out, I worked briefly in aerospace, but got tired of being laid off all of the time. So, I took up fixing cars. I did pretty well, at first. But later on I took a job at a factory that manufactured hospital furniture and fixtures.
For the next two years, I welded stainless steel 8 hours a day, five days a week. When I started having severe migraines, the doctor told me I should stop welding before I end up blind...So much for another career.
I drove trucks for a while, then a tow truck. When the owner of the tow company found out about my mechanical background, I suddenly found myself back fixing cars. This time I stayed, and eventually retired from a fleet shop with the County. I tried working after I retired, but discovered it was costing me as much to keep on working as it was to just draw Social Security and my state annuity...So, I don't do anything right now, just work on my own little projects, go for rides on my bike, and basically play, every day. Sometimes I feel worthless.....but it passes.

winchman
08-12-2011, 12:45 AM
It's been almost twenty years since I had a job. I highly recommend retiring early, and I'm really sorry I waited until I was 46 to quit.

wbleeker
08-12-2011, 01:29 AM
Are You a Prisoner of your Job?
Just escaped for lunch!
Will

Black_Moons
08-12-2011, 02:20 AM
So, I don't do anything right now, just work on my own little projects, go for rides on my bike, and basically play, every day. Sometimes I feel worthless.....but it passes.

I believe that is the true goal of the human race. to STOP WORKING.

DickDastardly40
08-12-2011, 05:11 AM
I retired from the Royal Navy 20 months ago (aged 42) after a career of 26 years of doing exactly what I was told and to be fair telling other what to do.

I now work on a 47 metre private motor yacht as a rotational chief engineer working a 10 week about cycle with payment all year round and flights home included.

I worked for 18 months on a charter yacht to gain further qualifications needed to apply for the job I now have; it all stems from those 26 years where I was a prisoner of the job where I gained my core skills and highly varied experience.

In 3 weeks I will fly home for 10 weeks at home with my wonderful wife and 4 year old son, a huge honey-do list and who knows maybe some time in the shop.

The OP's son is fortunate to be doing what he loves when he is young, I hope it lasts for him. I think I'll be doing this job as long as my wife can either stand me being away from home for half the year or being at home for half the year.

The Artful Bodger
08-12-2011, 05:29 AM
I am retired now but I have not done a real days work since my school days.:)

It wasnt good planning and it wasnt bad luck, I always had a job but it was always a job I enjoyed doing, so I guess I did work it just didnt feel like it.

flylo
08-12-2011, 07:57 AM
I worked 50+ hours for the same place for 32 years,starting in high school. I too thought it was all about money until it 50 I had a severe back injury. I found out quick there is no loyalty or job security. In the middle of it all a tornado(very rare for here) destroyed my hanger & shop & planes at the airport. So now I walk with a cane,hurt a lot,have to stretch out several times a day, miss skydiving ,scuba diving,hiking,cycling, am limited in getting out hunting, walking in the woods etc. But don't feel sorry for me because I'm free. I don't accept handicapped only slowed down a bit. Sure there's a lot I can't do but much more that I can do. I buy anything that lifts,rolls,etc. I'm learning some machining after all these years & am having a ball setting up a new shop. LIFE & HAPPINESS ARE ALL ABOUT ATTITUDE. But let me give a little advice to the younger guys here. Get & stay out of debt, live everyday as it's your last(it may be) & buy a good long term disability policy. I wake up every day feeling truly blessed. I was a buyer & love to buy & sell. I kept getting comments about a show called American Pickers. I don't watch TV but saw 2 shows. I love it. Never knew before then I've been one all my life. Fly over a farm see something cool, tag it on the GPS & go see the guy. Pretty easy when he finds out it was you doing all those circles over his farm or even land in the lane or fresh cut hay field. Makes it easy to strike up a conversation. Got to go & see a guy about some stuff. Great topic! :D

Bob Fisher
08-12-2011, 10:38 AM
Work is only WORK when you don't enjoy what you are doing. I'm 75 and still "work" part time, about 20 hrs per week. I enjoy what I do and actually look forward to days when I have something to do. I also enjoy the interaction with my co-workers. Bob.

brian Rupnow
08-12-2011, 10:52 AM
I sometimes consider myself the luckiest man in the world when it comes to careers. I started in mechanical design in 1965 with a large engineering company, and immediately knew that this is what I wanted to do for the rest of my life. Over the years I attended college classes and upgraded my mathematical skills and gradualy moved from detail draughtsman to design draughtsman, to senior designer, to Design Engineer. I have worked for wages up untill about 10 years ago when I established my own small consulting company. Fortunately, the pay has always been good enough to allow me the hobbies and trips I wanted to take with my family. I just turned 65 this summer, and I am looking at impending retirement with really mixed feelings. I don't really need the money at this stage of my life, but it still buys the toys and the trips. On the other hand, I don't have the energy level now that I did when I was younger, so although I still want to work, I don't want to work quite as much now.:D :D ---Brian

vpt
08-12-2011, 10:56 AM
I try not to work but people keep bringing me work.

garagemark
08-12-2011, 11:18 AM
I work for several reasons; money being only one of them. I like my toys, and I have many such toys by working steadily.

I like the challenge. I was recruited to my present position to get this plant's high voltage system back in order (15kV substation blow-ups weekly), and to increase efficiency and safety of the electrical system. I knew it would be a challenge, and even though it can be quite stressful, it is fun for me. BTW- I have accomplished the greater part of the mission. Our 15kV system is much more stable now. We rarely [ make that never] blow subs off the pads anymore. There is more to do, and I have almost free reign to do what I wish, with plenty of money to do it.

But the biggie is insurance. My wife is a cancer survivor, but it has taken hundreds of thousands of dollars to get her there. I could never afford to pay premiums for the type of coverage we have working for the man.

Weston Bye
08-12-2011, 11:40 AM
..But the biggie is insurance. My wife is a cancer survivor, but it has taken hundreds of thousands of dollars to get her there. I could never afford to pay premiums for the type of coverage we have working for the man.

Yep, that's mostly what keeps me coming in.

madwilliamflint
08-12-2011, 11:55 AM
Yes.

Yes I am.

:-/

*kicks a can*

rws
08-12-2011, 11:55 AM
Yep, that's mostly what keeps me coming in.
Yep, me too. I could get by without an income, or damn near nothing. We grow our veggies, I could hunt and fish for meat. But if one of us got a serious illness, it could wipe out everything we have.

I plan on stopping as soon as I can though, 62 or whatever. I won't go the full 65.

Weston Bye
08-12-2011, 12:12 PM
I'm still wrestling with the 62 vs. 65 decision. If I go out at 62 I will have to carry some level of health insurance on my own for 3 years, maybe longer depending on the political winds.

I won't be able to afford vacations or the usual "retirement" activities, but I'll have more time to work on my projects, the things I want to do, some of which have demonstrated the ability to bring in some extra money.

bborr01
08-12-2011, 12:29 PM
I was released from a 30 year sentence about 5 years ago and have not regretted it for a minute.

It was a great job though.

Brian

lakeside53
08-12-2011, 12:33 PM
I worked 50-60+ hours a week for the 90's... and most of the 70 (straight from high school) and 80s. Accumulated 3 million Frequent Traveler miles (and maybe as many before they started those plans!). Burned out, quit at 48.

That was 10 years ago. A few intense consulting jobs now and then, but the phone doesn't ring much now.

I'm so busy - still "working" like a nut, but on stuff I choose. Given the chance, would I change my 30 years of working? Nope.. that's what let me stack it all toward the "end"...

BigMike782
08-12-2011, 01:12 PM
I am coming up on 30 yrs out of high school and have been lucky to have always had jobs I liked(with two exceptions).One job I quit after Jr Hitler thought he was one of my parents and one job I was days away from leaving and was able to transfer away from an absolute disasterous boss.
I enjoy what I do so it does not always feel like work.I have also been very fortunate to have some great friends that have given me leads when I was in need of a job.
I would like to work for myself but I do not trust myself enough to be my own boss.
I also would not want to make a job out of a very relaxing hobby.

gda
08-12-2011, 01:15 PM
OP advice can also be applied to getting married and having kids . . . . . .

Thruthefence
08-12-2011, 01:29 PM
Sounds like a super job to me, but if he is working for the US park service, how can he "transfer" to Australia?

George Bulliss
08-12-2011, 03:01 PM
Sounds like a super job to me, but if he is working for the US park service, how can he "transfer" to Australia?

Probably working for a concession (hotel, restaurant stuff) in the park. They hire far more employees than the NPS. I worked for concessions in Glacier and the Tetons when I was young. It was the best time of my life and I would do the same all over again.

When I finally did buckle down and enter the rat race, I found myself way behind all my friends, who already were established with mortgages, kids, and careers. I ended up with kids much later in life and will have to work longer than most my contemporaries. Thatís the downside.

But, I did get the chance to ski and climb all the mountains I wanted to, back when I physically could. Also, I think having some years of freedom behind me has made the daily grind much easier to take. Believe it or not, Iím actually a pretty happy guy!

George

shipto
08-12-2011, 03:42 PM
I worked for a company that gave stupid low prices for jobs, Part of the way they made money was to pay rubbish wages (but I was in dire need of anything at the time, previous employer had gone bump) but the worse thing was that they insisted on overtime and only paid £1 over base rate. With no real incentive to go in for overtime I missed lots of Saturdays and Sundays and had many arguments with the boss.
Anyway getting to the point since working there I have a hatred of overtime and will only do it if pressed hard. If we do not have enough money with my standard wage then we are spending too much is my saying.

a wise old man once told me "work to live, never the other way around" and the only exception to that is when you really enjoy doing what you get paid to do. A position I have only been in a few times in my working life.

john hobdeclipe
08-12-2011, 04:29 PM
His job in Yellowstone ends with the tourist season last day of Sept. He has the option to stay on and drive a snow plow all winter or transfer to any National Park in the World. He is thinking he might transfer to Hawaii or maybe Australia.


Tell him to take this opportunity to see Yellowstone in the Winter. My dad was there in the late thirties, CCC camp at Mammoth Hot Springs. He often talked about how stunningly beautiful it was in the Winter.

loose nut
08-12-2011, 04:30 PM
I, like most people have had to get up when I was told, go where I was told and do what I was told since I was 5 years old. I am really sick and tired of it.

I don't like going to work any more, it used to be a good place to work but times have changed, the company has become hard nosed and the local plant manager is a complete useless tyrannical AAAA*****HOLE.

I turned 55 a couple of months ago and in 7 weeks I will have worked for this employer for 30 years.That qualifies me for my company pension which is pretty good, equal to what most people make working plus bennies and I feel I am lucky to be in a position to be able to retire at that age, I feel obligated to retire and enjoy it, to not take advantage of it would almost be a crime. This will allow me to finally be able to do the things that I want to do. #1 is no more getting up at 5:30 in the morning.

So my only complaint is that the wife says no, I have to work for two more years to finish renovations on the house. I'm taking bets on whether I can hold out that long without killing someone.

Black Forest
08-12-2011, 05:02 PM
I feel lucky in that I get paid to do what other people have to pay to do!

sasquatch
08-12-2011, 10:42 PM
Re: Liking a job:

Out in town there is a custom wooden boat building business been going since the late 1920's.
Employs about 8-10 people.

The three senior employees just retired, (not all at the same time,)

The oldest had 52 years in there, the next 49 years, the third one 48 years.

Amazing!!

The Artful Bodger
08-12-2011, 11:26 PM
The best job I ever had was being in charge of a small airport on a tiny tropical island. Sun, sand and surf, dusky damsels too, but every Friday afternoon I had to go to work for the weekly plane. Ah.... you cant get jobs like that nowadays!

PS. the even paid me extra for the 'conditions'.:D

boslab
08-12-2011, 11:29 PM
over our side of the pond the case seems different, there are those that make policy decisions in the government who take the view that you must work till you die, and therfore pay tax till you die,
The retirement age has steadily been increased for men and women to 67, its just not funny, i work in the steel industry so you get the added bonus of on average dieing 10 years before your time, very profitable for the pension companies!, most of the retirees i know i get to see them lowered into a hole!
[the record was 2 1/2 months after finishing work at 65]
most of the guys i know around the 50 mark are like me, no chance of collecting a pension due to one way black taxi to the cemetery!
im 50 and i think i'll try and get out soon before i join them.stuff the pension
life after death my arse i'm beginning to wonder if theres life before death!!lol
mark

Bill736
08-12-2011, 11:47 PM
This thread reminds me of what Major Dick told us college freshmen Army ROTC students on our first day in class. His first words to us were " Ok guys, the fun's over !" He was right. High school days were fun . Everything after that was a lot more serious. ( He later added that anyone who could think up a new joke about his name that he'd never heard would get an automatic A in the class. Nobody even tried.)

x39
08-13-2011, 12:16 AM
Ahh yes, the dreaded "Golden Handcuffs"... The true prison is debt, not the job. As long as you keep the payables within reason, work doesn't have to be so onerous. I've been self employed for 24 years (one man operation) and have been through some damned tough times. As it stands rights now I own all my tools and vehicles outright, have zero consumer debt, and have a very modest mortgage payment. I don't make much money, but I don't really need much. My wife works in the administration of a hospital, makes a good wage, manages her own finances, provides us with excellent health care coverage, and enjoys her job. We don't go on big vacations, we buy used cars, and we cook our meals at home from fresh ingredients. Its all about being able to pay for the things you buy, once you start living beyond your means you're done. For young people getting started, my advice would be not to have kids until you're finacially stable enough to do it without incurring debt.

Arcane
08-13-2011, 01:00 AM
Debt? What's that? I've been debt free since I paid off my house in 1988... :D

Pete F
08-13-2011, 01:28 AM
I have to say, from recent personal experience, if you feel that you are a prisoner in your job, in the sense that it isn't what you want to be doing but you need the paycheck, you should at the very least be looking into what other options you have. A year ago, I was doing work that was neither interesting nor challenging (the two are generally related for me), but I was not looking for other options, because the paycheck was good. Then I was told I needed to move to another state to keep the job, and I did not want to do that.

It took 7 months, but I found a much better job, which is both interesting and challenging, with a better paycheck. Most likely, I could have found a similar opportunity years before, if I had looked. I don't regret in any way the path I took to get here, but never again will I think "I hate my job but I need it for the paycheck" without also looking for something else.

If you feel that works sucks, because, well, it's work, that's why they call it that... I guess all I can say is, I'm sorry.

-Pete

gundog
08-13-2011, 01:57 AM
I work a job I hate. I don't like the company or the local management. I have worked here 18 years. I have worked as a mechanic in my early years but I have been in the electric utility industry for 28 years. I was a lineman for the first 20 of those years I liked being a lineman but I hurt my back and had to move to a desk job. I don't make or fix things anymore and I miss that so I make up for it with my home business.

I started my home business in 2006 that has become fairly successful and I would like to quit my regular job but the good wage and benefits keep me a slave to that job. 3 years and 10 months I can retire early @ 55 I then plan to run my business full time. I am looking forward to that I just hope my health stays good.

My home business is machining parts and working with aluminum & plastic making fishing boat accessories. I work 12 hour shifts so I only work 18 out of 35 days in a 5 week rotation that is why I am able to run my business. I am getting tired of working both jobs but I need to finish my last few years and I don't want to close my business. It is a catch 22.

Mike

Joel
08-13-2011, 01:58 AM
One of the things I was glad to have learned early in life (beyond the obvious pitfalls of debt), is that the easiest way to make money is not to waste it. Every single dollar you pi$$ away is another dollar you have to earn. Recurring/monthly bills are the worst.

The competition and desire for the latest and greatest has forced so many people I know into HAVING to earn a boatload of money just to get by each month. If anything happens, they are screwed. They just have to have the newest smart phone with unlimited data, satellite with a DVR and blu-ray in every room, cars with every option and a million other things. Apparently these days, the general public buys cars based on how much they can afford monthly as opposed to how much they actually COST, which strikes my sensibilities as absurd.
It seems to me that many Americans have forced themselves to an almost impossible (and unsustainable) standard of living, yet seem little happier for for all the effort.

Also, I know few people who have much skill at all about how to get a good price on things, or are capable or even willing to repair anything. Heck, I know people who have bought hundreds of screwdrivers because they have lost hundreds of screwdrivers. I still have 99.9% of the tools I have ever bought, and when a screwdriver breaks, it gets exchanged because it made sense to me that a wear item needs to be purchased from a vendor that offers a lifetime warranty and would likely be in business 20 years from then. Such a simple little thing, but one that has 'made' me a not insignificant amount of money.

So, IMHO, getting the most out of products, spending as little as possible on them initially and occasionally waiting for a deal or just doing without, is as valuable as good earning power, and often a damn sight more satisfying.

Frank46
08-13-2011, 02:44 AM
After getting separated from the USN in 1967 I figured I owed myself some down time. Well after about three weeks my Dad who worked for the Long Island RR started asking the fateful question "when you gonna get a job?". I told him "hey pop.where do you think I've been these 3 years" all on deaf ears. About a week later I started working for a public utility in New York. Shoveling coal, sweeping coal and generally cleaning up the coal in a coal fired plant. Then started working at an oil storage facility and then a LNG facility. After 30 years of 24/7 I was burned out. Finally packed it in. Was the best decision I ever made. I had basically missed 15years of my two daughters lives. So for the last 15 years Dad has always been home with the wife and two girls, 5 turtles, 2 fish, 2 cats, three dogs. Granted leaving earlier did not exactly leave me with a stellar pension but other factors did come into play that financially leftus in decent shape. Both girls graduated college. That I'm proud of. OK sorry to ramble on. Frank

J S Machine
08-13-2011, 11:45 AM
Ahh yes, the dreaded "Golden Handcuffs"... The true prison is debt, not the job. As long as you keep the payables within reason, work doesn't have to be so onerous. I've been self employed for 24 years (one man operation) and have been through some damned tough times. As it stands rights now I own all my tools and vehicles outright, have zero consumer debt, and have a very modest mortgage payment. I don't make much money, but I don't really need much. My wife works in the administration of a hospital, makes a good wage, manages her own finances, provides us with excellent health care coverage, and enjoys her job. We don't go on big vacations, we buy used cars, and we cook our meals at home from fresh ingredients. Its all about being able to pay for the things you buy, once you start living beyond your means you're done. For young people getting started, my advice would be not to have kids until you're finacially stable enough to do it without incurring debt.

This is very true. 100% good advice here.

I'll tell my story, hopefully a few will listen.

A few months before I turned 18, my father passed. I had depended on him for extra money throughout high school. Even though I had a job, I routinely ran out of money and always went to him for a little extra. I never was able to depend on my mother through my teenage years. When my father passed, I remember taking the last two $20 bills from his wallet. I can still remember the way they were folded. I wish I still had them now. It wasn't long before I realized that nobody was going to support me but me. I had to go out and get a better job.

Luckily, right out of high school I got a full paid scholarship to a trade school where I took machining. I got a job with a small machine shop (job shop) and I only worked about 20 hours a week. It was enough to pay for my gas to and from school, and gain a little experience as well. About halfway through school I got the job where I am now, working in a tool and die shop in a big factory. After about 2.5 years of school, I graduated with an associates degree in machine tool. I got a pretty good raise at work with that, and was making really good money then. The only problem is that I have to work rediculous overtime for it.

My dad never graduated high school, and once he turned 18 he went to work for Brown & Root where he was a pipefitter. He did that for about 10 years until he finally had enough of having to answer to somebody else, and quit and became self employed. He started laying tile then, and did it until he died. He didn't make much money, but he was happy because he was his own boss. He talked a little about this while he was alive occasionally, but I can't rmemeber the specifics of it. I wish he was still here today so that I could ask him about it and get advice on my own situation.

I remember the day I went into work at the tool room I'm at now. I remember my boss saying "Ok, 10 hours will have you getting off at such and such time, if you come in at such and such time"..I remember thinking to myself "10 hours!, what the heck??!" Little did I know then, 10 hours was a short day. We routinely work 11 and sometimes 12, and saturdays are mandatory - at least 8 hours and sometimes 10. I work 50% of sundays, usually 8 hours, but we have worked more. I go in at 5am and don't get off until around 4:30pm every day. Every day, since we support production, we have no idea if or how long we will have to work the next day, until late in the afternoon of the current day. You can forget a schedule of any sort.

For some reason, I had some skewed thoughts of Machining being a "normal career", the way it is "supposed to be", working 8-5 monday - friday. Man was I wrong. After almost 9 years in the field, most older machinists agree, you won't find a machine shop job for much less than at least 50 hours a week.

So, now for why I quoted the post above:

I am not perfect, and I'll admit I have made some financial mistakes, but the good news is that I have learned from them. In 2006, after working for a few years, I decided it was time to buy a house. I found a really nice one and bought it on a 100% financed loan, 30 years, $0 down. This was at the height of the housing market boom. Then not long after that, I met my wife and we were married in 2008. Not long after this, I decided that since we worked and made good money, we deserved to drive nice cars. So now we have two cars, which we owe more than they are worth, and a payment on each. In 2009 we had our little girl.

We both work a full time job, yet still don't have much money left at the end of each month, if any. I'd like to be able to walk away from my job situation and find other opportunities or options, but I can't afford to. Every since I have had a family, I want to be at home with them, not out working my life away while their life pases me by. It gets worse and worse as time goes on and my daughter grows up. But like I say, I can't just quit. All I can do is soldier on until some things are paid off, the housing market comes back up, and then maybe I can look at some other opportunities. Don't get me wrong, I love my job and I work for a good company. I just don't look forward to starting every week over (if I get sunday off) to the same thing. I have other things to do in life besides work it away.

Point is, Don't make the same financial mistakes I did and put yourself in a situation where you have to make a certain dollar amount/hour to get by. It just isn't worth it.

Black_Moons
08-13-2011, 01:14 PM
30 year loans scare the hell outta me for so many reasons, Primary one being is at 30 years its not gonna be fixed rate.
For one, Just 30 years ago the prime rate was 25%, you can't even pay off the last 1/4 of your house if the intrest rate is 25% and basicly can do nothing more then hand it over to the bank.
If prime goes up to just 10% with 20 years left... Your pertty screwed and your previous payments will only cover the intrest.

A fixed rate loan, at 20 years, is only gonna give you 50% more money to buy a house then a 10 year loan, After 20 years you gain *NOTHING* and have to make the same payments as a 20 year loan.

So basicly, as I see it, you either have enough money to buy a house in 10 years... or rent. Good luck with that, Considering the houses around here are $300,000+ and that works out to like $5000/month mortgage.

I am really hoping for a major fall in the housing market. Like the next black plauge or something.

J S Machine
08-13-2011, 02:10 PM
It is fixed..6.5%. I will have paid in $60k this November, and I have taken $7k off principle.

If I would have taken that $1k a month house payment and saved it, I could buy the materials and land outright and build my house and be mortgage free today.

Sobering reality.

loose nut
08-13-2011, 04:56 PM
The only people that are true slaves to their job are the ones that feel they need to eat everyday and live indoors. Silly isn't it, wanting to live indoors. Some people are just spoiled.

If you weren't born with a million dollar bill in your hand then you are a slave to somebody, either someone else or to your self.

madwilliamflint
08-13-2011, 04:59 PM
The only people that are true slaves to their job are the ones that feel they need to eat everyday and live indoors. Silly isn't it, wanting to live indoors. Some people are just spoiled.

If you weren't born with a million dollar bill in your hand then you are a slave to somebody, either someone else or to your self.

uhm... no.

MaxHeadRoom
08-13-2011, 07:37 PM
I am retired now but I have not done a real days work since my school days.:)

It wasnt good planning and it wasnt bad luck, I always had a job but it was always a job I enjoyed doing, so I guess I did work it just didnt feel like it.

I know what you mean, I have been extremely fortunate that although I have always been permanently (and latterly self) employed, I have never worked a day in my life!.
Max.

flylo
08-13-2011, 10:26 PM
Be debt free, live below your means, do more than is asked of you, be thankful, have a positive attitude, do what you enjoy, live life with gusto & you'll be happy & free. :D

Thruthefence
08-14-2011, 05:14 PM
"Primary one being is at 30 years its not gonna be fixed rate."

Is this a Canadian thing? All my Mortgages are fixed 30 year. Not tied to the prime rate in any fashion.

The only thing variable, is the affect inflation has on the dollars I spend, which really works in favor of the home owner. (barring apocalyptic plagues, & so forth)

Wasn't Canada affected by the burst of the "housing bubble"?

loose nut
08-14-2011, 05:38 PM
"[B]
Wasn't Canada affected by the burst of the "housing bubble"?


Not so much, our banking and investment laws are a lot tighter then in the US so much of the financial meltdown missed us. Some loss was felt on foreign investment though. Guess where, in the US. It is harder to get a mortgage now though.

gary350
08-14-2011, 07:54 PM
Sounds like a super job to me, but if he is working for the US park service, how can he "transfer" to Australia?

He is not working for the US Park Service he works for a company that supplies workers to the US park service and many other places too. You apply for a job and you get to choose where you want to work. He applied for the job in January there were lots of Job opening for Yellowstone National Park then. They supply workers for the beach areas along the cost of the USA and other countries during tourist season. They supply workers for motels in Las Vegas and Reno. They supply workers for Ski resorts in the winter. Some of the jobs offer good pay. The most desired jobs like National Parks don't pay much the reward is being there.

Thruthefence
08-14-2011, 08:55 PM
"The most desired jobs like National Parks don't pay much the reward is being there."

Thanks, that makes perfect sense. Man, that would have been a dream job for me, in my younger years.

lwalker
08-15-2011, 01:41 PM
It seems like the US is the unusual one with having long fixed rate mortgage terms. From what I'm told, in most other countries it's almost impossible to get a fixed rate loan for more than 5 years or so.



"Primary one being is at 30 years its not gonna be fixed rate."

Is this a Canadian thing? All my Mortgages are fixed 30 year. Not tied to the prime rate in any fashion.

The only thing variable, is the affect inflation has on the dollars I spend, which really works in favor of the home owner. (barring apocalyptic plagues, & so forth)

Wasn't Canada affected by the burst of the "housing bubble"?

garagemark
08-15-2011, 03:31 PM
If we all lived within our means, and saved some of our money.....

Do you know how many financial institutions would collapse (or not exist at all)? All those white tie million dollar guys out of work? The loan officers laid off? The CPA's walking the streets? Oh the horror of it all!!!!!!! :eek:

I'm just glad we're all up to our eyeballs in debt. Those guys badly need us. :D

Alistair Hosie
08-15-2011, 06:20 PM
Only the very rich can be truly free most people are as you say in part a prisoner of the system. When you retire it's only right to enjoy what little time is left to you.Most of my relatives died with a few years of early retirement and never got the chance to enjoy freedom of that kind.My father died aged 61 and never saw retirement uncle aged 61 retired from the police aged 55 mother in law died 60 all heavy smokers uncle in australia a non smoker died of cancer aged 58 brother in law died cancer aged 33 and so on and on.So please my friends enjoy your good health a free time when you have it.Alistair

Black_Moons
08-15-2011, 06:36 PM
It seems like the US is the unusual one with having long fixed rate mortgage terms. From what I'm told, in most other countries it's almost impossible to get a fixed rate loan for more than 5 years or so.

Oh, you can get 20 year fixed ones here, but the intrest rate is so high you hardley end up with lower payments then a 10 year (Only about 30%? lower)
After 20 years the intrest rate is so high, your payments are the exact same as a 20 year.

justanengineer
08-15-2011, 11:02 PM
I feel rather fortunate in that I worked my ass off and made all of the correct for me decisions in life and am finally succeeding at the age of 27. For those that dont know, I spent seven years in the military after high school, went to college completely on the Army's dime, got my bachelors in three yrs instead of four, and now work as a mechanical engineer designing engines for a living. Despite all of the correct decisions, I made enough mistakes and had more fun while in the military than any single guy w/out a STD, kid, or wife should have had. By the time I got out, between the military lifestyle and deployments, I was all funned out. :D

Needless to say, no, I dont feel ruled by my career. I go to work every single day and have an absolute blast! I interact daily with research groups, our various labs, and everybody else down to the end customer. I dont make a mint yet compared to some, but am well on my way to that and an early retirement (40s) thanks to the low cost of living here, and I do make more than most.. Regarding time off, I only get two weeks vacation, but I do earn another day each year, and the travel opportunities/amenities are plentiful enough that I dont need/use vacation time otherwise.

Personally, I would question your advice in the OP Gary. Being fresh out of college, graduates are at their highest regarding "saleability" to many companies as they still possess a broad knowledge base - they havent yet begun to specialize. They are basically free to go anywhere and become anything they want, and smart recruiters appreciate this flexibility. They also tend to work harder and are willing to travel more than older workers. Also, IMHO, most anyone with a degree in something other than business or the various "arts" should easily be able to find a job with a minimum of two weeks vacation starting, and if youre in a major city you should be able to negotiate up to four or five weeks vacation. One of my brothers actually started over $100k and six full weeks of vacation a few years ago in Washington DC less than a year after graduating. Not to say that anyone shouldnt stop to enjoy life once in awhile, but why stop and enjoy life before you have actually worked and built up a life to enjoy? I could go work in the woods and enjoy it, but I would enjoy it much more if I had a nice house, sports car, awesome career...something to come back to. If I didnt have something started to transition back to, it would be similar to getting out of the military and having to start life over - scarey as hell.

Life doesnt get complicated and you dont become a prisoner of anything until you have a family and/or children...

PixMan
08-15-2011, 11:16 PM
Life doesnt get complicated and you dont become a prisoner of anything until you have a family and/or children...

Having a wife and 3 children did not make ME a prisoner of any sort. Quite the opposite really, because I soon learned that true love knows no bounds.

x39
08-16-2011, 12:11 AM
So please my friends enjoy your good health a free time when you have it.Alistair
The best sentence of the whole thread.

loose nut
08-16-2011, 02:12 PM
Working for your self is OK as long as you don't go postal and kill the boss.

loose nut
08-16-2011, 02:27 PM
It's all well and good to say "you" (insert your name here) are not a prisoner to your job but unless you can walk up to the boss on any given day and say I quite and you and your family won't starve, the bank won't foreclose, the lights won't go out from lack of payment ETC. you are a prisoner to your job. The bosses/corporations know this that is why they are able to treat most of us like $#!? and we can't do much about it. A fact of life we all have to live with so we might as well accept it.


No mortgage, a plain adequate house and of course the shop and tools

No car payments, 11 years old car 22 year old truck

I don't carry credit card bills, I rarely use them anyway

I pay any utility bills every month etc.

Any time I did have to get a loan, car loan etc. I always pay them of as soon as possible. Banks will no longer loan me money because they can't make any money off of me. I'm fine with that. I wasn't born to make them profits.

Black_Moons
08-16-2011, 04:54 PM
I don't carry credit card bills, I rarely use them anyway

I pay any utility bills every month etc.

Any time I did have to get a loan, car loan etc. I always pay them of as soon as possible. Banks will no longer loan me money because they can't make any money off of me. I'm fine with that. I wasn't born to make them profits.

The banks call people like you 'Deadbeats' :rolleyes:

Heaven forbid someone actualy live up to the terms of the loan contract. Should be taken out back and shot :rolleyes:

Id say being rich is not about how much money you make. its about how much money you can spend after you pay all your debts/rent/mortgage/insurance/yadayadayada.

Sometimes, I think my brother with a family, house, huge shop, etc, Is actualy much poorer then me. He works 5 days a week, 8~10 hours each day.. Never get to see him cause hes allways too damn busy with work.. And when he gets off work? Well, Its either A: Time to sleep, or B: time to do yard/house work, or maybe, if hes really lucky, He has enough time to change a diaper or two.

I have no idea where he found time to have a 2nd kid.

loose nut
08-16-2011, 05:04 PM
If staying out of debt, caring my own weight and not letting other people get richer then they need to be at my expense is a deadbeat then I'm glade to be one.