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KiddZimaHater
08-12-2011, 08:03 PM
What's your least favorite thing to do in the shop?
Mine would have to be single point threading. GGGRRRRR....
It drives me nuts.
cut, check, cut, check, measure, cut, check, and hope I don't forget to disengage the feed in time and run into a shoulder, or forget to back-out, or engage at the wrong time. I hate it.
And don't forget the threat of torn or ugly threads hanging over your head.
A necessary evil, I guess.

Mcgyver
08-12-2011, 08:14 PM
single pointing is no worse/better than other ops.....you just need a bit of practice and good thread mic :D

worst would be one of

- when the coolant tank goes stinky :(

- bending 1" conduit

- grinding welds

- cranking the knee all the way back up when you've used that 1" drill in a R8 taper adapter

- dropping that little part and you think it bounced far under the bench

- mounting a 12" chuck :eek:

- getting the 7.5hp burnt motor out of the bottom of the dirty greasy griming base of the DSG (lathe)

- getting the 7.5hp rewound motor into the bottom of the dirty greasy griming base of the DSG (lathe)

I could keep going but i'm talking myself out of machining....

Bob Ford
08-12-2011, 08:21 PM
At least two things you can do to make life easier.

#1 If your lathe can safely run in reverse, cut threads from the back. This lets you cut towards the tail stock.

#2 Do not use power. Make a crank so that you can turn by hand. Surprisingly fast.

Bob

Dr Stan
08-12-2011, 08:28 PM
moping the floor

PixMan
08-12-2011, 08:47 PM
If you're that intimidated by single-point threading, do it a LOT more. The more familiar you are with it, the better you'll be at doing it and the the less you'll hate it.

My least favorite task with have to be cleaning chips out of the lathe. It's a HUGE pain it the arse because the machine has a large chip pan, and it's integral to the machine.

The splash/chip guard fastened securely to the machine doesn't move, and because of the size machine and the shop we had to place it close to the wall. This means there's no way of walking behind it so I have to push the chips from the front, up and over the lip of the pan and onto the floor and then pull them out from underneath the machine. I only do it once or twice a year, unless it gets full before than from a rare high-chip-volume job.

Kind of hard to see the situation in this photo, but believe me if I realized just what a pain this position was going to cause I just might have sacrificed another 18"-24" of space behind it. It ain't moving now though.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v466/kenm10759/Dads%20shop/IMG_0284-r.jpg

goose
08-12-2011, 09:10 PM
Least favorite;

Changing out the vari-speed belts on the lathe. (This) afternoon's worth of bending, kneeling, cursing, pulling, stretching, but at least no smashed fingers.

DATo
08-12-2011, 09:27 PM
I don't mind threading anything but copper. Other than that I'd say cutting anything thick out of stainless steel on the bandsaw.

vpt
08-12-2011, 09:56 PM
Constantly cleaning up chips, curls, swarf, cutoffs, dirt, grease, dust, and stuff.

Zahnrad Kopf
08-12-2011, 10:19 PM
Constantly cleaning up chips, curls, swarf, cutoffs, dirt, grease, dust, and stuff.
Ha ha! Sure beats the alternative, though. Hey?:D

Weston Bye
08-12-2011, 10:29 PM
Remember those sliding-tile puzzles? The one with 15 tiles and space for 16? My shop is like that. I have too much stuff in there and cleaning and straightening up the shop is like working one of those puzzles. At best there might be "a place for everything, and everything in it's place", but when all is said and done, there is no place for anything else.

Where I work, they instituted a program they call 5-S. Something like Sort, Straighten, Shine, and a couple of other S-words I can't remember. Reminds me of the pre-dating routine s***, shave, shower, shampoo, shinola.

Anyway, I had mixed feelings about the program because on one hand, they threw out or disposed of a lot of good unused machinery and material that didn't have immediate use, but was stuff I relied on to build quick fixtures and test devices.:mad: On the other hand a lot of the disposed-of stuff wound up in my home shop.:rolleyes:

I need to do a personal 5-S, but some parts of that process are just painful.

Deus Machina
08-12-2011, 10:45 PM
Mine is the yearly/twice-yearly clean-and-build of my little mill.

I know I should do it more often even for a large machine, but the adjustments on the little Chinese thing need to be done everywhere, to the point it's easier to tear it down to the nuts in bolts, degrease everything, check the specs, and just adjust the gibs and such as it goes back together from the bottom up.

Especially aggravating that the head (a third of the weight of this thing) is anchored to the column with wires that are about six inches too short to anchor it to that spot with, and that my last rebuild either missed a chip or moved the column pivot plate 180 degrees, and now the Z-axis is out of tram a little.

Project: Remove column, center pinch middle at top of mount, reattach, measure. Then find properly sized sockets to make the wires between the column and head removable. Then sell for a bigger machine. :D

sasquatch
08-12-2011, 10:45 PM
Dust, cobwebs, and odds and ends lying about are just "Shop Patina".:D

bborr01
08-12-2011, 10:57 PM
My least favorite would probably be fixing jobs that someone tried to fix already and screwed up.

I had a set of cases for an old Harley panhead a while ago that someone had tried to drill a couple of broken studs out of and had the drill wander off location.

If you have ever tried to drill a steel stud out of aluminum, you know what I am talking about.

Got it fixed though. One happy Bro there. He said it runs great. I told him to bring it to me first next time.

Brian

Bill736
08-12-2011, 11:27 PM
My least favorite shop task is the summer cleanup of where the winter mice found a new place to nest.

SGW
08-12-2011, 11:38 PM
Least favorite, or at least the thing I seem to have the hardest time doing:

Staying organized.

Oldbrock
08-12-2011, 11:45 PM
I don't have anything I do in my shop to dislike. I look forward to threading and any other machining job. Don't even minding cleaning up. Whenever I'm in my shop I'm not in the kitchen and thats ok by me. Just made a set of bushings for a Harley chain case, took a front wheel apart and bored the hub for new bearings and oversize shaft then re laced the wheel and got it running within .005". I get all the fun stuff. Never grumpy in the shop. Even built a set of stairs for the deck yesterday from WOOD. Peter:D

daryl bane
08-13-2011, 10:16 AM
Machining CAST IRON. Hate the nasty stuff, and what a destructive mess.

Black Forest
08-13-2011, 11:33 AM
Cleaning out the coolant tanks. Whatever is in there is the worst and it takes a week to get my hands clean.

Metalmelter
08-13-2011, 11:34 AM
My least favorite would probably be fixing jobs that someone tried to fix already and screwed up.Brian

Boy I will agree with that for sure. It's one thing to constantly try and improve the skills on the things that irritate me - so that's why I practice them when I can. And lets face it, there's a bunch of silly things in the shop I'd rather no be bothered with but to pick up where someone else walked away just kills me....
Thank God I dont get a lot of that.

Next on my list would be the assumption I'm Mr. Free Fix-It of the neighborhood. Yup... Just walk on up to me and complain and expect me to drop what I'm doing and solve your crisis. Did I mention too I also am expected to stock every last fastener, chemical, tool, etc..... Something's wrong with this picture :rolleyes:

MichaelP
08-13-2011, 12:27 PM
1. Cleaning old dirty machinery after purchase
2. Storage planning

Guido
08-13-2011, 02:10 PM
Worked summers in an old fashioned gas station, where they sold peanuts from a vending machine, gave out S & H Green Stamps and had Tom's crackers for sale with the admonishment: Don't go 'round hungry.

Three of us had a deal, flip coins to see who had to clean the woemen's rest room. We'd often trade chores, two or three men's room cleanings could be traded equal up, for one cleaning of the womens'.

Maybe it had something to do with the location of the station? I dunno.

--G

photomankc
08-13-2011, 03:00 PM
Machining CAST IRON. Hate the nasty stuff, and what a destructive mess.

I second that. I despise the cleanup needed after working it.

baldysm
08-13-2011, 03:37 PM
Bandsawing is up there with me. I have a tiny 4x6 h/v bandsaw. It works as a bandsaw, but that's about it. It's been on my list to replace the flimsy table with a better one, but then I think... I can just buy a real bandsaw when I have the cash.... My hands and forearms get tired and sore after awhile.

Cleaning the coolant tank is another... favorite. I'll have to do that one again soon. I always am stuck with 5 gallons or so of used coolant and never quite know what to do with it.

Powder coating is another disliked task. Thankfully, I don't do it often.

Black_Moons
08-13-2011, 03:43 PM
Repairing broken tools. Hate it. Especialy expensive tools, that I just broke.

Followed by painting. Can't get it perfect, Power of OCD compells me reguardless.

MCS
08-13-2011, 04:35 PM
Tapping M2.5 (approx 0.1""). I use the size because things can be designed smaller.

At tapping time, which is also finishing time, I always regret my choice.

The first taps broke just by looking at them, I have found taps of which I haven't broken one, but the fear of breaking gets in the genes.

form_change
08-13-2011, 07:48 PM
My least favourite task is probably packing up for the day (I'd much prefer to continue)

For Pixman and others who don't like cleaning out lathe chip trays, try a variation on this. My lathe when I got it was missing a grill that went in the bottom of the lathe that stopped chips going into the sump. Based on drawings and photos I had I made up a new (sheet metal) version, but with extended sides and a handle.

http://i1140.photobucket.com/albums/n574/form_change/P1010199Small.jpg

When I have to clean it out, I just brush chips into the middle of the pan, lift it out and tip into the bin. The handle sits at the non-business end so it doesn't get covered in swarf, and there are locating tabs underneath so it does not move around.

http://i1140.photobucket.com/albums/n574/form_change/P1010200Small.jpg

I remove this from the rear of the lathe but with a little thought there is no reason that something could not be removed from the front, especially if the carriage was cranked over to the far right.

For those with benchtop lathes, oven trays (baking sheets) can also be used to catch chips.

Michael

saltmine
08-13-2011, 08:37 PM
Even though I'm getting used to cleaning up after the day is over, I still hate cleaning swarf off of my machines, and sweeping the floor. If only I could get a nice looking college girl to do it for me...I'd be a happy camper.

PixMan
08-13-2011, 08:44 PM
Nice idea, but go back to the first post where I put the photo of my dad's lathe. You can see that from the front of his machine there's a couple of inches (literally, about 3 of them) of space between the feed clutch knock-off cam rod and the edge of the machine base, even with the carriage cranked out of the way.

That's one way of getting chips out, but a tray is futile because you'd have to tilt it to get it out, dumping it's contents right back into the pan. We simply cannot get to the back of the machine like yours, because its only 6" from the wall. If we could get tot eh back, there's an immovable splash/chip guard there. We are left to choose between pushing the chips up over the rear lip, onto the floor and then pull them to the front, OR simply try scraping the chips up and over the front lit of the machine. It seems the latter is the slightly easier, but still no joy.

lugnut
08-13-2011, 08:49 PM
The thing I seem to have the hardest time doing and dislike the most is GETTING STARTED:eek: after that gets done I like it all.

saltmine
08-13-2011, 08:52 PM
When the swarf gets too deep for me, I usually drag out my 3 horsepower shop vac and go to town on the machines and chip trays. There is little that the thing won't pick up, including off-cuts, spare change, nuts & bolts, and an occasional wrench. A word of caution, though. Don't forget to empty the canister frequently. I let mine get full, and had to sling it with an engine hoist in order to dump it. (The waste management people are still upset with me.)

I still like the idea of having a nice looking college girl do my cleanup work, though.

PixMan
08-13-2011, 09:29 PM
The big ShopVac is what I use to get all the chips from the Bridgeport. Given that I'm often using carbide insert face mills at (for a 1HP Bridgeport) ridiculous material removal rates, the chips are EVERYWHERE. Using eh ShopVac made that job go from one I hated to one I really don't mind one bit.

What took far too long (upwards of 30 minutes) with brushes and brooms is now a 5 minute job and far more thorough.

I'm thinking I should use it in the lathe too, but the hose is larger than the space I have to get it into the machine. For now. ;)

Robin R
08-13-2011, 09:56 PM
Nice idea, but go back to the first post where I put the photo of my dad's lathe. You can see that from the front of his machine there's a couple of inches (literally, about 3 of them) of space between the feed clutch knock-off cam rod and the edge of the machine base, even with the carriage cranked out of the way.

That's one way of getting chips out, but a tray is futile because you'd have to tilt it to get it out, dumping it's contents right back into the pan. We simply cannot get to the back of the machine like yours, because its only 6" from the wall. If we could get tot eh back, there's an immovable splash/chip guard there. We are left to choose between pushing the chips up over the rear lip, onto the floor and then pull them to the front, OR simply try scraping the chips up and over the front lit of the machine. It seems the latter is the slightly easier, but still no joy.

If you are having trouble getting the chips out at the front of your lathe, you could do what Form Change did and remove the apron.

I got one of these and found it very helpful, especially the big birds nests that clog up a shop vac hose. http://www.leevalley.com/US/wood/page.aspx?p=32072&cat=1,42363,42356&ap=1

PixMan
08-13-2011, 10:04 PM
Remove the APRON to get chips out? Shirley you can't be serious. ;)

Take a look at the photo again. Of the 4 rods going across the front of the bed, three of them (lead screw, feed drive rod, and motor control) all pass through the apron. I would venture it's a 6 hour job to take it all apart, more to put it back together. Heck, I just got it so the oil doesn't all piss out as soon as I put it in.

Besides, I think we're looking at the back of form change's machine. I think that's a taper attachment showing there.

Robin R
08-13-2011, 10:50 PM
I think you are right on a second look, it was a fun idea though.

PixMan
08-13-2011, 11:00 PM
Oh yeah, thanks for the link to the magnet. I've seen those in other shops before. Great idea, but I'll need to buy the aluminum and brass versions too. :p

ak95xj
08-13-2011, 11:21 PM
My newly discovered "passion"..Welding cast iron.. (no o/a or any means for preheat)

Putting whatevers in my hand down for a minute than forgetting where I left it and having to search for 5 minutes.(happens every time)

BadDog
08-14-2011, 03:29 PM
PixMan

As you may remember, I have a very similar lathe (17x60). In my old shop, I also had the same "against the wall due to space concerns" problem, and the same cleaning problem. What I did was create a simple little tray that lays in between the ways. For modest chip producing jobs, it keeps all the chips up there and easy to clean my simply lifting out the tray just as described earlier. The tray was made with a bit of scrap shaped on the shop-made press brake to fit the contours. It actually holds enough that cleanup is not a bother, even on fairly large jobs. I might have to lift out and dump a few times, but it's so easy that's not a problem. I find I still prefer this even now, though I have plenty of room behind it now. For one thing, dropping thread wires isn't nearly as problematic that way. ;) Likewise for parting off and many other things that are less than convenient when dropped in a pile of chips.

Dr Stan
08-14-2011, 06:10 PM
I now have a new least favorite task after finding a dead bunny rabbit courtesy of my shop cat. It had been there at least 2 or 3 days as it was full of maggots.:(

rohart
08-14-2011, 06:17 PM
Dr Stan - do you have to ??? Yeuchhhh!!!!

Sweeping the chips and swarf out of the lathe is a pretty pokey job, but...

I've been fixing leaks from my lathe's headstock and gearbox. I've now installed a valve instead of the drainplug in the headstock, but not in the gearbox. Draining the oil from the gearbox is a MESSY job, even with a drainpan box welded to the right shape to catch most of it. It's oily, greasy, slippery, uses tissues like trees are free. I suppose it's fairly clean, in that the oil by now is no longer dirty. But still, it's oily, greasy,... Oh yes, I mentioned that already.

gary350
08-14-2011, 07:40 PM
My least flavorite thing is cleaning up. I have not swept the floor in 20 years. I rake chips off the mill and lathe then scoop them up with a flat shovel. Thats about all the cleaning I do. Any time I need to work on something with tiny little parts I take it apart in the driveway or inside of a cardboard box so none of the tiny parts fall on the floor. I dropped my lathe chuck key on the floor about 5 years ago it is a good thing I have 3 spares I never found it.

flutedchamber
08-14-2011, 08:13 PM
The absolute least favorite is picking steel splinters..the very tine ones..out of my hands and fingers.

Black_Moons
08-14-2011, 10:54 PM
On my lathe, I removed the splash guard, its in the way of removing the cross slide... And never really did much good. Makes getting to the back of the lathe easyer and lathe takes up less room.

On a side note, a shop vac is GREAT for sneaking under (or behind) the lathe to pick up chips from the chip pan. If it grabs a rats nest... Just pick up the rats nest, drag it out, and pull it off with your hand (or gloved hand) and toss it into the trash, repeat.

PixMan
08-14-2011, 11:19 PM
How often do you feel the need to remove the cross slide? I took the cross slide off my dad's Victor once, soon after I had it delivered, to replace the screw & nut assembly.

On that machine it wasn't required to slide it off the end. Once you'd removed the gib and taken out the mounting screws for the nut, you could pull it off sideways over the now-opened-up dovetails. The screw itself came out from the front of the machine. We'd have a BIG mess without the splash guard, as most of the chips and much of the coolant would drop right onto the floor.

Deus Machina
08-15-2011, 12:36 AM
Oh, I forgot one!

Machining stainless steel. I hate that stuff.

KiddZimaHater
08-15-2011, 01:51 AM
Machining stainless steel
That's better than machining Inconel. :mad:

dp
08-15-2011, 03:09 AM
What's your least favorite thing to do in the shop?

Doing dishes, after.

loply
08-15-2011, 09:04 AM
Changing screw cutting gears on my small lathe.

Right faff on, can never be bothered.