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View Full Version : True Endless Sanding Belts ?



Edwin Dirnbeck
08-14-2011, 09:08 AM
I am tired of the bump bump bump when using belt sanders.Does anyone make a true endless belt with no I repeat NO joint. When you google this ,it seems all belt makers think that their belts are endless even thou they have joints. thanks Edwin

J Tiers
08-14-2011, 09:16 AM
Don't know of one.

The bump size varies, though. Some use what almost seems to be an overlap, with a huge bump (cheap china and USA junk). Some use a very thin tape, which is reasonably tolerable.

I use 1 x 30, and that tends to run more to the cheap junk. I have had them pop apart the tape joint as soon as I touched a workpiece to the belt

gwilson
08-14-2011, 09:45 AM
Nothing wrong with the properly Mylar taped joints. They are as "bumpless" as you can find. I ground the surgical amputation knife on those,as well as the Bowie. The amputation knife was a tricky knife to grind,and the Mylar taped joints did fine. Something must be wrong with your 30" belts. They may be old stock. The joints will eventually fail on old ,but never used belts.

J Tiers
08-14-2011, 10:05 AM
Something must be wrong with your 30" belts.

No doubt! ;)

I don't think they are old stock, but you never know..... it depends WHERE they got old..... not at the store, and not in my shop, but.....

none of the bumps is bad unless you work against the platen.... except for a few chinese belts where the overlap seems to stick out of the front....:rolleyes: And I agree, the tape is almost undetectable anyway.

there are a couple types of tape though, some is very thin, some not so thin. Both better than the "overlap" type.

lakeside53
08-14-2011, 11:45 AM
I have a bunch of major brand (I need to check which) mylar taped belts that are very good. On the other hand, I was using a friends' 6 inch belt grinder with a bad bump against a platen - huge bang that stunned me for a few seconds - it snapped. Mounted another, same thing. He got rid of these belts.

darryl
08-14-2011, 02:43 PM
We've had a few belts at work that are bad for that. You have to push boards through the machine a few extra times on the same setting to reduce the pattern left by the belt. You don't get rid of the pattern, just lessen it so you can minimize the amount of orbital pad sanding you have to do after that.

I've gotten to the point of wondering if I can grind away some of the grit on the belt at the junction before even using the belt. Once you use it, the problem gets worse because the belt loads up at that point and the join becomes even thicker. Maybe I could use it a bit, then the thick spot shows up on the grit side more easily, then try to grind it down.

I thought we were down to the last two of those belts- then I hear there's a whole box of them left. Sigh.

Black_Moons
08-14-2011, 03:18 PM
darryl: What you need, is to buy a few oz of industral diamonds, and some nickle plating equipment, Plate a huge sheet of precision ground steel.

Then feed that through your belt sander :) Won't be any lump after that!.. Assuming theres anything left after that.

CCWKen
08-14-2011, 03:29 PM
Somebody must make them. They make sanding drums and toilet tissue rolls without a bump. It's just whether or not you open your wallet. :p

darryl
08-14-2011, 03:29 PM
Hmm- forget about the sanding belt. Why don't I get a large surface plate and nickel plate the diamonds to that- then I can fire the boards across it at high speed. Straight through the table saw, then past some stain brushes, the lacquer spray- automate the whole bloody process :)

But the diamond idea is interesting. Why couldn't I set up a nice flat 2x6 to lay the belt on, then align the join across it. Then use a diamond stick and just plane across the join-

Black_Moons
08-14-2011, 03:36 PM
Hmm- forget about the sanding belt. Why don't I get a large surface plate and nickel plate the diamonds to that- then I can fire the boards across it at high speed. Straight through the table saw, then past some stain brushes, the lacquer spray- automate the whole bloody process :)

I like it, Do you think you can find HSS err I mean HSL (High speed Lacyer) that works at over 200SFM?

I mean its just wood so the spray tips should'nt burn out if you make em outta carbide....

I recommend putting the table saw first, If you feed the wood through the wrong way, it will accelerate the wood for ya.



Actualy, come to think about if, if your belt sander is to dimension the lumber... Why not just use a roller coated in diamonds? Should'nt ever wear out on wood... they tend to not load much as the nickle makes it a closed matrix.

Course, then theres those plainers that use like 99 carbide inserts.. Or the ones that use HSS knifes. I guess a good sander does a little better job, especialy on wood that likes to tear out.

Btw, I once tryed to use diamond coated dremel tools to balance a abrasive wheel by grinding the side.. Did'nt really work very well... Just did'nt remove much material.
Maybe sand paper is easyer to grind since its not so thick and the binder isent as strong.

PS: Wire wheels CAN be ground via sanding drum, or belt sander, Works wonderful to dress the wire wheel to be consistant length, remove 'bumps' and stray wires from the wheel, etc. Id bet it also 'sharpens' them too. (Protip: Mount the wire wheel in a drill press, turn it on fastest speed, and support the sander on the drill press table)

TOOLZNTHINGS
08-14-2011, 09:07 PM
Hello,

Have you tried Norton or 3M brand belts ? I find these to work the best in all my belt type sanders including my hand held Dyna file.

Brian

elf
08-14-2011, 09:20 PM
I am tired of the bump bump bump when using belt sanders.Does anyone make a true endless belt with no I repeat NO joint. When you google this ,it seems all belt makers think that their belts are endless even thou they have joints. thanks Edwin

Why not add more mylar tape around the inside of the belt, so there is no bump left?

Black_Moons
08-14-2011, 09:47 PM
Why not add more mylar tape around the inside of the belt, so there is no bump left?

I think you just revolutionized belt joining. Just use longer tape.. of any thickness, ever so slightly shorter then the belt.. very small gaps are acceptable, lumps are not.

darryl
08-14-2011, 09:50 PM
The manufacturers should make the belts properly in the first place, so this problem isn't there. For our wide belt sander, we have another manufacture of belt which doesn't have this problem at all. The cloth backed ones seem to be better.

J Tiers
08-14-2011, 11:15 PM
Hello,

Have you tried Norton or 3M brand belts ? I find these to work the best in all my belt type sanders including my hand held Dyna file.

Brian

Those were the very type that popped apart at the first touch of the workpiece to the belt....... All the belts here are one of those two. I don't recall which it was that failed, but at least two did.

The china ones had a nasty lump, but at least they used enough glue.....

Your Old Dog
08-15-2011, 07:23 AM
My belt sander is only used for rough work so it's never been a real problem as there is always much sanding done with the orbital afterward. For a final finish I like cabinet scrapes with a light touch.

TOOLZNTHINGS
08-15-2011, 08:12 PM
Hello,

I've noticed that belts I have had to long from the time I have purchased them will break sooner. I try to keep my supply at the minimum. I always buy from McMaster- Carr, you always have the option to return if there is a problem. I buy the polyester cloth backing where possible.
Been there on the belt breakage and understand your frustration.

Brian

metalmagpie
08-16-2011, 05:57 PM
First of all, large supplies of sanding belts should NEVER be found in home shops. The glue joints have a definite shelf life. Found that out the hard way. Buy only as many belts as you'll use up in 2 years.

Second, buy belts where pro knifemakers shop. Lots of guys use Klingspor. They make nearly everything.

Here are some sources:

http://klingspor.com
http://www.usaknifemaker.com
http://www.trugrit.com
http://popsupply.bizhosting.com/abrasives.html

metalmagpie

topct
08-16-2011, 06:50 PM
I never try to put the belt to doing actual work until I sort of break it in a little. I run a piece of heavy gauge sheet metal across it lightly enough so I can hear the tick of the seem going by. Gradually increasing the pressure and going back and forth across the belt until I don't hear or feel the bump so much. At least better than what a new one feels and sounds like.

If I spend the time to do the above I get a much better total life time out of the belt, even though I'm having to wear it out a bit.

These are cheap and old 1x30 belts.