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View Full Version : Going to take a look at a bridgy



vpt
08-20-2011, 10:46 AM
Very close to me (basicly same town) bridgy popped up on the list. Not much for a description but it is a J head which from what I read is a bit better then the older M head because of the R8 taper and power downfeed. Looks fairly clean in the pic and looks to have power X feed as well. Is this bridgy to early to have chromed ways? I've asked before but I would like a refresher before going to take a look, what are the important points to be inspecting with these machines? Its been 14-15 years since I've worked with a mill so I have forgot pretty much everything I knew. I would assume to check out the ways for wear but I know some machines it is hard to tell if there is wear on the ways because of their design. Not sure if it is under power yet to check for bearing noise and if everything works. From the machines I've seen over the last couple years of watching this one is a bit higher priced but the location is perfect (save me fuel and time getting it) and I don't know what "some tooling included" all entails.

What do you guys think? Some pointers on what to check out and how to check with or without power? What do you think of this bridgy John? :D

http://wausau.craigslist.org/tls/2505765517.html

John Stevenson
08-20-2011, 11:23 AM
Nooooooooooooooo.

Run don't walk, take up drinking or boat ownership, both are far more rewarding.

x39
08-20-2011, 02:13 PM
Hard to say from the image, but looks to be all there. One place you may be able to beat the guy down a little on the price is if there appears to be backlash in the lead screws. This can usually be taken up later by a simple adjustment on the leadscrew nut. Makes a good bargaining point though. Easy proximity to the machine is a big plus, moving this kind of stuff any distance takes a lot of the fun out of it, unless you happen to have friends with wierd senses of what constitutes an enjoyable day. I'm rich in the latter respect, and am one of those friends to many. Good luck.

DATo
08-20-2011, 02:47 PM
This looks interesting .... a horizontal Bridgeport.

http://stlouis.craigslist.org/tls/2514779803.html

Not a bad price considering the DRO and power feed (by the way, I can vouch for that BP power feed ... it's a good'un).

davidwdyer
08-20-2011, 02:49 PM
Don't pay attention to John, he's just jealous... I mean prejudiced.

Backlash is important and also look at the ways and see how much, if any scraping can still be seen. Smooth ways with "lines" worn in are a sign of a lot of use. If you can still see a fair amount of scraping, it might have had little use.

It looks like a shorter table from the picture. Is that a power table feed on the left side?? If not, what the heck is it?

Probably the vise comes with it which is a big plus and "some tooling" might be a good thing too.

PixMan
08-20-2011, 03:19 PM
When you go look at the machine, position the slides about in the middle of their travel. Take note of how much backlash the screws have. Then, with the locks loose, grab the left or right-hand handle with your hand cupped over the end of the screw. (Meaning not holding onto the handle itself.)

Tug and push with some force. You'll probably feel some degree of looseness, I can almost guarantee it. Now you just have to decide if there's any adjustment range left in the gibs, or is it too worn to consider.

If it's under power, engage the feed worm and test to see if the down feed works. Set the quill stop in such a place as you can see if the quill feed kicks out OK when it reaches the stop. If the machine is not under power, you're taking some chances because you can't hear how the spindle bearings sound or how well the brake works.

form_change
08-20-2011, 05:53 PM
Dato, the big problem with those horizontal Bridgeports is that most people don't have walls strong enough to mount them.

Michael

vpt
08-20-2011, 06:03 PM
I am going to look at it monday.

PixMan, when you mention tugging and pushing are you talking about on the table itself, or the Y leadscrew in and out? Am I looking at the knee ways or the table ways? Sorry, I was just taught how to basic run the machines I never actually learned much about the maintenance and the wear the mills gets and how to check for it.


David, now that you mention it the table does look shorter then normal. I did notice the what looks to be X power feed being on the wrong side but I just assumed it was some other make power feed that just designed to go on that side. Now I'm thinking the whole table is weird, did bridgeport offer other size tables for these? Looks like it is a 11x36"ish table with a European power feed. :D

vpt
08-20-2011, 06:05 PM
Dato, the big problem with those horizontal Bridgeports is that most people don't have walls strong enough to mount them.

Michael


Keeps the chips off the mill. :D

JCHannum
08-20-2011, 06:35 PM
David, now that you mention it the table does look shorter then normal. I did notice the what looks to be X power feed being on the wrong side but I just assumed it was some other make power feed that just designed to go on that side. Now I'm thinking the whole table is weird, did bridgeport offer other size tables for these? Looks like it is a 11x36"ish table with a European power feed. :D

It does appear to be a short table, probably 36". I seem to recall that the Zeromax powerfeed mounted on the left end of the table.

darryl
08-20-2011, 08:45 PM
You gotta re-learn the axes on those horizontal mills- the way the manual describes x and z doesn't make sense- don't ask me y.

PixMan
08-20-2011, 09:36 PM
I am going to look at it monday.

PixMan, when you mention tugging and pushing are you talking about on the table itself, or the Y leadscrew in and out? Am I looking at the knee ways or the table ways? Sorry, I was just taught how to basic run the machines I never actually learned much about the maintenance and the wear the mills gets and how to check for it.



I mean to pull on the X axis (left or right) end of the table itself. Doing that, if there's any play in the gibs for the table or the Y axis, you'll find it. There's a little too much weight on the Z axis (knee) to be able to get a feel for wear on that, so that'll have to be a visual reading.

uncle pete
08-21-2011, 12:44 AM
If you buy it I'd highly recommend taking it apart to move it. Their really simple machines and you'd end up with about 10-12 lighter lumps to move instead of one really heavy one. You can then clean, inspect each part as you put it back togeather. Also that would be a good time to verify that the one shot oiler is delivering the correct ammount of oil to all the oiling points. That's also the easist time to do the backlash ajustments too. Remove the motor first,You Use the machines table to support the weight of the head with the bottom of the spindle touching a piece of plywood on the table while removing the 4 mounting bolts.. The whole head then comes off in one piece. After doing mine I'd never move one in one piece. The base, table, Z axis casting and head are the 4 heaviest parts. Be careful to protect the leadscrews if you do this, They are delicate as far as any dings, Those will screw up the accuracy.

Pete

oil mac
08-21-2011, 07:01 AM
The Bridgy sounds good, If you are not successful, What about an Elliott 00? :eek: :mad: :confused: !!!

Davo J
08-21-2011, 09:06 AM
One good point I have heard about the shorter tables is the ways wear less than the longer ones, because of less over hang/weight.
Of course it will depend on how much work the machine has had over the years.

Dave

vpt
08-21-2011, 09:39 AM
I appreciate all the input and tips! I will be looking to break it down into at least a couple smaller easier to handle pieces. I've done this with my surface grinder when I brought it home.

I've been watching a few videos to help refresh myself on the controls of the mill so mainly I don't mess something up when checking it out especially if it is under power. I am pretty excited, I hope its a good one, I've been looking for quite some time.

vpt
08-22-2011, 08:49 AM
Today is the day! Fingers crossed all is good. Hope she isn't like a hotdog down a hallway!

I was looking last night and couldn't find much info on the chromed ways and what years and models had them. It does sound like either way the ways should have flaking visible?

lakeside53
08-22-2011, 11:33 AM
The problem with the visible portion of the chromed ways (top of knee) is that the "flaking" is very misleading - you can't see the surface that that wears - the non-chrome underside of the saddle. If you take the table off, you'll see that the chrome can wear through on the saddle top outer ends. Looking up under the table wont show much.

Don't get too concerned with reasonable "wear"; it isn't a new BP :). If it has one shot oiling - after you buy it - check that end to end...

Post the serial number of the knee (right at the front - slide the cover plate back) and the head. The head number is usually higher than the knee - they made a lot more heads.

vpt
08-22-2011, 12:39 PM
Just got back from checking it out. lake, I didn't check any numbers, was gone when you posted.

Low down on the mill, seems awfully clapped out to me. With everything set center I could push forward and back on the left side of the table (by the power feed) and see the other end wiggle 3/16-1/4". Moving the table toward me with the Y screw the saddle would tighten up to the point the screw was hard to turn and there was about 1-1.5" of visible ways left before the saddle was flush with the knee ways. The table X slop wasn't as bad. I could turn the X screw all the way from one end to the other. When set in the middle I would say the table ways added about .060" to the previously stated 3/16-1/4" total slop at the end of the table. The knee ways, well, seem to be good. I turned the knee all the way to the top and there seemed to be steady feedback pressure to the crank handle (which was broken and welded back together). all the way. The table is nicked all over but no visible broken out chunks or drill holes. Big enco vise comes with it, looks to be 6" wide.

The head.. I could turn the pulleys freely and couldn't feel anything chunky. When put in back gear I could not turn the belts/pulleys by hand. Power quill feed lever was turned 180 degrees so it didn't use the pin holes in the casting. It did seem to work however. The quill would fall down on its own, you would have to hold it up with the fast feed lever. No fine feed quill feed wheel and the forward reverse knob is missing. I did however see what looked to be good threads in the shaft to accept a knob. Guy said the power quill feed will pop off if the downward feed pressure gets to high, like drilling holes with bigger drill bits. The tapper in the spindle felt smooth. The head looks to be a little different color then the rest of the mill. The power feed is a zero-one if I remember right and is big. I saw it has a belt drive from the motor to the gearbox and he says it does work.

Guy said it has a new drawbar, comes with the vise and a collet set. Listed at $2000. After looking for awhile we talked a bit and I mentioned that I have seen these machines sell for as little as $1000. I asked what his bottom dollar is and he said $1500. Talked for awhile and told him I would get back to him.

uncle pete
08-22-2011, 01:20 PM
Just for general information Bridgeport themselves don't recommend using the power feed for drills much over 1/4"-3/8" The internal power feed mechanisum isn't designed for this. It's used for single point boring when using a boring head.

Pete

aboard_epsilon
08-22-2011, 01:25 PM
if you read lathes .co.uk write up on the Bridgeport ..it says what the max drill size to use with power feed ..and it is small.

the guy is correct what he says about it tripping out ..it will

the table being tight at the end of its travel sounds like mine ,...

the nut needs loosening off ..then you will have 3/4s of a turn back play in the handles

1/4 inch side to side in the table ..may be just the gib strips need tightening.

what happens is the become loose ..then cuttings will get in the gap ..makes it impossible to tighten the gibs unless gib is fully pulled out the gap cleaned ..with sawing action ..piece of rope etc.

going by what you're paying ..and knowing that in the USA they pay more ..i would say it's about a good a deal as your going to get from a dealer.

all the best.markj

macona
08-22-2011, 02:02 PM
Keep looking. Dont stick yourself to a bridgeport. They are the Kleenex of milling machines.

vpt
08-22-2011, 03:44 PM
Mark, The saddle to knee gib was sticking out about 2" toward the handles (front of mill) and looked like it moved back and forth some when I moved the table. Is it possible the gibs are worn past adjustability? It just worries me because my lathe is worn a decent amount and tightening the gib in the loose spot will make it impossible to move the carriage over to the tight end. That is how the ways on this mill feel to me but worse.

The mill over all looks very used to me.

Couple things I forgot to mention earlier. He pointed out that they just got a newer (better) bridgeport mill to replace this one. Looked to be the same mill just nicer condition, he said they got it at auction. He said he wasn't the machinist but the night guy is. The place this mill is at is a food product factory, the mill is in the repair room. So I would imagine these mills see mostly stainless work if it matters.

vpt
08-22-2011, 03:57 PM
Keep looking. Dont stick yourself to a bridgeport. They are the Kleenex of milling machines.


I've read threw the many posts and topics about bridgeports vs other mills. I have been keeping an eye out for any kind of mill really. This one was just so close I had to look. If a bridgeport isn't worn to death I have faith it will do everything I would want to do with a mill. John is a good example, he complains about bridgeports all the time but every picture he posts he is using it. :D

I have heard at least one person say they like their brand of mill whether it be a lagun, tree, enco, millrite, etc. I guess I lean toward the BP side because of how many their are for parts, tooling, accessories, etc.

Which mill would you suggest?

John Stevenson
08-22-2011, 04:42 PM
Sounds like it's in mint condition for a Bridgeport :p

Andy, the only reason I have got mine is that I was at an auction one day and got a phone call from a good customer who asked to to look over a Bridgeport mill for their electronics guy.
He didn't need one but they were just humouring him, I did all the mechanical work and it pi$$ed me off a bit.

So sorted the best one out with loads of extras and they paid 2800 for it plus buyers premium, plus professional rigging, so probably stood them at 3500 tops.

He never used it and that pi$$ed management off so one Christmas Ii got a phone call, did I want it ? and if so it had to be gone over the holiday when he was away.

I said OK but I'm not paying anything like what you did, the prices have dropped [ true ], they weren't really bothered, they just wanted it gone as a lever to get rid of the guy.

Seeing as it was Christmas I gave the two directors 500 cash
each. Collected it New Years Day, set off at 10:00am and was back in the house at 2:00pm with it in bits in the van.

Came with horizontal attachment, quillmaster plus the swivel bit, full collets, imperial and metric, vise, 10" rotary table, slotter head [ but I sold that as I have a slotter ] and a load of insert face mills and inserts and shell mills.

Problem is it's tied in the shop, two days to get it out and if I bought a larger / sturdier mill I'd have to re-equipe it and to be honest it's not worth the effort.

IF I did I'd get one of these

http://www.warco.co.uk/productimages/pictures/ThMain_633748750419760000_WM40%20final.jpg

10" x 51" table, box ways, full oiling, knee power feed built in and by geared 3 phase motor.
3 HP spindle to 4,200 rpm, weighs 2,640 # against a Bridgy at 2,200 #

5,000 brand spanking new.
One of my customers has just bought one and I'm dead impressed with both fit and finish.

aboard_epsilon
08-22-2011, 04:53 PM
Mark, The saddle to knee gib was sticking out about 2" toward the handles (front of mill) and looked like it moved back and forth some when I moved the table. Is it possible the gibs are worn past adjustability? It just worries me because my lathe is worn a decent amount and tightening the gib in the loose spot will make it impossible to move the carriage over to the tight end. That is how the ways on this mill feel to me but worse.

The mill over all looks very used to me.

Couple things I forgot to mention earlier. He pointed out that they just got a newer (better) bridgeport mill to replace this one. Looked to be the same mill just nicer condition, he said they got it at auction. He said he wasn't the machinist but the night guy is. The place this mill is at is a food product factory, the mill is in the repair room. So I would imagine these mills see mostly stainless work if it matters.
by the looks of it the gib is brocken in half ..

The gib has been dropped on the floor ..mine only sticks out 1/4 of an inch

or its i been aloud to get out of adjustment, got full of crap ..and the gib lock has broken it, as its rocked on the crap ..

with this in mind ..i would re-estimate it at $600....time money ..effort to fix it isn't worth the $1500

If he wont take that ..find another ..i bet he didn't pay 1500 for his auction machine ..

ps ...has any one got any motor contactors ..mine are failing ..head motor keeps turning itself off ..

pps ...disregard all i said if it sticking out on the left hand side ..then it is a case of missing or broken adjustment screw or general crap in there ...and the crap can be in the back as well as the front.



all the best.markj

vpt
08-22-2011, 05:10 PM
I appreciate all the input!

Mark, the guy told me they paid the asking price for this mill when they got it. Not sure what they paid for the new one but I have been at local auctions around here before and the mills go for $1000-$1500 but I haven't seen any machine auctions lately. Apparently I missed out when they got that other one at auction somehwhere around here.

John Stevenson
08-22-2011, 05:10 PM
ps ...has any one got any motor contactors ..mine are failing ..head motor keeps turning itself off ..

all the best.markj


Mark,
That's a design feature so you can run a 110 volt machine on 240 volts. :p

aboard_epsilon
08-22-2011, 05:30 PM
if you look this album of mine ..the pics at the top sort of explain how the gib works ..

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v190/aboard_epsilon/bridgeport/

this is the knee gib in this album ..but you can see on one photo, the cut out in the gib, for the head of the adjustment screw ..

that screw wasnt put back in there in that condition ..i welded up the slot and put a new slot in it.

its the knee one ..but its the same method ..my gib was sticking out ..because the ways were full of crap.....it was a job to get the screw out ..as it was so full of crap.

lazlo
08-22-2011, 05:33 PM
I have heard at least one person say they like their brand of mill whether it be a lagun, tree, enco, millrite, etc. I guess I lean toward the BP side because of how many their are for parts, tooling, accessories, etc.

Different class machines. Millrite is a neat little 3/4 sized Bridgeport. Great for a hobby shop. Beaver and Tree are more stout, and nicer made IMHO, than a Bridgeport. Then there's Lagun, Excello, and TOS, which are pushing 3,000 lbs.

Tooling is a wash, because you can get all of these mills in R8, NT30, whatever. As far as accessories -- most turret mill accessories you'll find are meant for the 3 3/8" Bridgeport quill. The Lagun has the same quill size, but the Excello, Beaver and TOS have bigger quills. But unless you're looking for a Volstro rotary head or a right angle attachment, that doesn't seem like a huge issue.

I posted a comparison table awhile back with the size, weight, and work envelop of the various mills:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showpost.php?p=597737&postcount=8

uncle pete
08-22-2011, 06:39 PM
I'm in no way trying to drag this thread off topic But I've got to agree with Sir John, Bridgeports and the clones are good versitile machines that are more than ample for most users needs. But a Bridgeport is a pretty limber machine as far as the built in rigity to resist cutting forces. Bigger/heavier is always a good thing. I certainly can't deal with the weight for the larger industrial equipment but due to my job in the mining industry I've been in the machine shops where a Bridgeport is usually stuffed in a corner and reserved for the real light duty jobs. We have a Cinncinatti universal mill with both vertical and horizontal capabilities. It does really look like a overgrown Bridgeport that's been injected with far too many steroids. I don't know the model number but I'd estimate the table to be around 100" long and 18" wide. Probably 5 plus tons in weight. If I had the room and area that could handle the weight then to me it would be the ultimate mill for home shop use. In todays market sometimes equipment like this goes dirt cheap. So for the original poster I wouldn't get too fixated on owning a true Bridgeport. The name itself carries a premium price. Other posters have mentioned other brand names that are recognised in industry as being superior to a real Bridgeport and can be bought without that premium price. Just one more point of view.

Pete

vpt
08-22-2011, 06:44 PM
Mark, Great picture album! Looking at the pics for sure this mill was missing a gib screw and the gib was coming out the front. I tried to hold it with my finger while I moved the table but the gib was stuck where it was at in the saddle.

Lazlo, Nice list. If this mill had more tooling with it I would be more apt to buy it but just a vise and collets. I have seen a couple laguns for sale over the last year or so but they are double the price of the bp's and no vise or tooling at all. Are they that much nicer?

lazlo
08-22-2011, 06:46 PM
3 HP spindle to 4,200 rpm, weighs 2,640 # against a Bridgy at 2,200

Bridgeport Varispeed is 2,095 lbs shipping weight. Off the skid it's 1900 lbs soaking wet :)

Notice a lot of the difference in weight of these machines is in the knee -- it's not gratuitous. That Warco has a massive knee compared to a Bridgeport.

Punkinhead
08-22-2011, 06:49 PM
Wait for another one. They're a dime a dozen so there's no reason to settle. I had to look at quite a few before finding a nice one, but even that only took a couple of weeks because there are so many on the market here in the midwest.

38_Cal
08-23-2011, 12:01 AM
I ended up with an Enco Bridgeport clone from a dealer in the Chicago area...there was nothing in central Iowa when I was looking 3 1/2 years ago. I was fortunate to have a couple of friends, one to check out the machine for me (lives about thirty miles from the dealer) and another to help haul it back on yet another friend's borrowed trailer. :D

David

macona
08-23-2011, 12:59 AM
My supermax has been great, it is basically the same machine in the pic that John posted, a copy of a BP Series II. Supermax has great parts support. Everything I have ever needed has been in stock in california, including the 30 taper spindle I replaced the R8 with. And that was less than $300.

We picked up a only used on sundays Enco mill at work. Its a real nice machine. No complaints. I think anything out of Taiwan should be OK.

Davo J
08-23-2011, 01:50 AM
I know it's close but I would let it go, the guy has pretty well said it is worn out by buying a better one to replace it. Surely he cant expect the same money back that he paid for it, after all the use it's had.

If it just had a mechanical problem you could fix it, but once it is worn out scraping costs a lot so you either have to learn to do it, or try to find someone to do it that is reliable and close.

Dave

vpt
08-23-2011, 09:07 AM
Yeah I'm gonna wait some more. I don't want an all clapped out machine to complain about for years to come because I didn't wait a little longer for that "other one".

sasquatch
08-23-2011, 09:24 AM
Re: cause i didn't wait a little longer for that other one:


Somewhat similar to chasing women!!!!:D

vpt
08-23-2011, 10:18 AM
Re: cause i didn't wait a little longer for that other one:


Somewhat similar to chasing women!!!!:D



You know what, it does seem very familiar! This bridgy was like the kind of women you pay money for. :D

Black Forest
08-23-2011, 10:24 AM
VPT you pay money for every woman! Some are just more upfront about the costs!

Toolguy
08-23-2011, 11:08 AM
You are wise to wait for a better machine. There are lots of them out there that are better than that one, some for less money. As for the woman thing, I can tell you renting is way cheaper than owning. I have never rented, but that is a fixed amount. The other way is a bottomless money pit.

vpt
08-23-2011, 05:33 PM
I agree renting is much cheaper and no upkeep!

This might be the only and last mill to ever come into my shop, I figure its worth waiting for a good one for the right price and hopefully more tooling.

vpt
09-25-2011, 07:00 PM
There is a 10x54" comet for sale by me.

10" x 54" working surface
hardened and ground way and table
3 HP motor, R-8 or NST#30 spindle taper
16"x36" travel - quill travel 5"
machine weight 3,050 lbs
auto lubrication system, Meehanite casting
variable speeds from 60-4200 RPM
electric power consumption 228v, 3 ph, 60 hz
floor space 67 x63 x 71
power feed Y-axis

Any good/bad feedback on these?

mike4
09-27-2011, 05:27 AM
Nooooooooooooooo.

Run don't walk, take up drinking or boat ownership, both are far more rewarding.
Sir John,

I would suggest that he buys the Bridgeport , and does take up both of your suggestions , that way he will have something to anchor his boat to while he staggers off to the Pub!

Michael

gaston
09-27-2011, 11:12 AM
I have a Comet same size. Bought it for 400.00 as scrap iron. I had to replace some missing parts ( rt table end plate & bearings, quill feed knob ,belts etc.)
All the parts I installed were from used bridgeports and fit like the were made for it except the vari drive belt. I bought the belt for a "clone" (was told they were different from the bridgeport belt)and its too wide, it works but the speed readings are off. My son uses Bridgeports at work and perfers the comet.

Bill736
09-27-2011, 09:05 PM
Bridgeports made quite a favorable impression in their earlier years after introduction. The neat thing about them was that, for a fairly compact and lightweight machine, they had capabilities and versatility that many larger milling machines did not. From small machine shops to large industrial users, they've played a significant part. As a result, there are many clones or near clones of the design. However, they were never intended to replace the very large milling machines common in industry. People who dislike Bridgeports may be expecting them to do tasks they were never designed to do , or may be using worn out Bridgeports that will not hold the tolerances of a new one.

uncle pete
09-27-2011, 09:47 PM
Bill,
I'd agree with your assesment 100%. But their biggest selling point is just how versitile they are. From a HSM perspective they are pretty well what most people would ever need.

Design wise, They are a really limber machine in comparison to even a hobby sized horizontal mill. I've seen a few pictures on this forum of depth of cuts taken with a 1/2 hp Atlas horizontal mill that would be totally impossible with my 3 hp Bridgeport clone. But those horizontals won't or can't do a lot of jobs as easy as a Bridgeport type will. If the OP for this thread isn't looking for the absolute highest industrial metal removal rates then a Bridgeport type in half decent shape should work just fine.

All joking aside, I'm quite sure if you poured enough ale down Sir Johns throat, Then sooner or later you could get him to admitt in public that "Bridgys" are versitile and do have some good points besides holding down the shop floor.:D

Pete

Black Forest
09-28-2011, 01:18 AM
There isn't that much Ale in the world!

Toolguy
09-28-2011, 02:09 AM
Sir John seems like an accommodating sort. I'll bet he'd be willing to play along to see if you're right.:rolleyes: Out of fairness to John in exchange for his valuable time the chemicals in question should be provided by the author of said experiment of course.:D

.RC.
09-28-2011, 03:53 AM
Seeing as it was Christmas I gave the two directors 500 cash
each. Collected it New Years Day, set off at 10:00am and was back in the house at 2:00pm with it in bits in the van.


I can just imagine it.... A dark dreary pea souper fog whisking around the town of Nottingham... A mysterious man in a great overcoat is seen slinking his way towards a house carrying two brown paper bags.... The contents of which only he knows..... He brushes past people in the fog and they barely notice his existence... He is then seen posting one of the brown paper bags through the letter slot of a house, then he disappears once again into the fog, to do unknown deeds.... :D:D

uncle pete
09-28-2011, 06:21 AM
B/F, Tool Guy, .RC.:D :D :D Good ones.

Pete

.RC.
09-28-2011, 07:25 AM
This one here had a 105mm quill.... Much larger then the standard bridgy of 87.something..
http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/250891787726
And currently we have this stout looking baby cinci

powered overarm and all http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/190579182155 (http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/190579182155?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649)