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View Full Version : 12" Atlas Parts Question!!!



flyboyziel56
08-23-2011, 09:52 PM
Hi guys just a quick question on a Atlas 12". After I bought this machine I noticed alot of thngss wrong with it (hence the low cost!!). The quick change cover is broke, the handle's for the change gears are broken, and so is the Forward/Reverse lever. Along with the crossfeed handle being broke I had no luck finding the parts on Ebay of Craigslist. If I want to buy a complete machine off Craigslist for around 6 to 7 hundred dollars, or call Clausing and be ready to get rapped!!!, I was wondering if anyone has made the parts out of steel to replace them??. This lathe is more then salvagable and the ways are nearly perfect!!. I bought a Forward/Reverse lever off Ebay last week but it looks like one off an earlier model (very thin) and don't know if it will work. Just putting some feelers out there to way my options!!. I appreciate any and all of your advice on this!!. As always Thanks in advance...............................Allan:o

TGTool
08-23-2011, 10:28 PM
Sounds annoying but not too serious. If you're talking about the handle that locks the banjo for the change gears, a nut and washer will work. You can make something there easily enough even with a coupling nut with a cross hole in it. The crossfeed handle is a fairly standard balanced handle that you can get several places from Grizzly to McMaster Carr and MSC. It has a 3/8" hole and a keyway so you may have to bore or sleeve and produce a keyway somehow. It's not a critical one since it's only giving you a grip on the leadscrew so even if it were sloppy it's only a minor feeling annoyance since you're depending on the dial for actual slide position.

By reverse lever are you talking about the reverse tumbler or the dog clutch lever on the early, no quick change gear box lathes?

You can probably find more specific help including parts at the Yahoo Atlas/Craftsman discussion group.

gzig5
08-23-2011, 10:30 PM
Keep watching ebay. There are a couple sellers that seem to put these Atlas/Craftsman parts up all the time. You've got the lathe, try making the parts.

flyboyziel56
08-23-2011, 10:46 PM
Keep watching ebay. There are a couple sellers that seem to put these Atlas/Craftsman parts up all the time. You've got the lathe, try making the parts.



Thanks for the reply guys!!. The reverse tumbler gear which is attached to the banjo is the one that's broken off. It's all there except the pin and handle which lock it in the holes. The one I got off Ebay is thinner and may be from an earlier year??. Mine is so much thicker, and the listing states it's for a 10/12" Atlas lathe. As for making the parts I thought about cutting some handles from some 3/4 low carbon steel and using my Enco mill and Clausing lathe to fabricate the 2 broken handles on the QC for the Atlas!!. I just don't know about the serviceability on the A36 ???. I think it's Do-able!!.

vpt
08-23-2011, 10:52 PM
What model 12" do you have? I have some extra atlas stuff laying around I can part with. Have any pics of the lathe and the levers it needs?

flyboyziel56
08-23-2011, 11:17 PM
What model 12" do you have? I have some extra atlas stuff laying around I can part with. Have any pics of the lathe and the levers it needs?


Thanks Andy!!, I'm at work right now so pictures are not available right now. I know they make 2 types of the model 12". There is a desk type and a bench style. Mine is the bench style with a QC box. I can send pictures and a model number tomorrow morning. I will Be in touch. Thanks....... Allan

JCHannum
08-24-2011, 09:36 AM
If it is an Atlas 12", not the Craftsman 12", it is the later machine with the heavier bed. Some of the bits and pieces such as the gear will differ from the earlier versions but will be serviceable until something better turns up. The gears are standard gears and commercial gears can be adapted.

There is nothing wrong with fabbing replacement parts. Most of the steel parts were leaded steel and low carbon will work just fine.

flyboyziel56
08-24-2011, 11:11 AM
If it is an Atlas 12", not the Craftsman 12", it is the later machine with the heavier bed. Some of the bits and pieces such as the gear will differ from the earlier versions but will be serviceable until something better turns up. The gears are standard gears and commercial gears can be adapted.

There is nothing wrong with fabbing replacement parts. Most of the steel parts were leaded steel and low carbon will work just fine.

I took some photo's of the machine this morning. The model is a #3986 and it is an Atlas!!, not Craftsman. I believe I'm not allowed to post pictures here, or for that matter it will not allow me??. Is the Craftsman and Atlas QC gear box interchangable?. It may be to my benifit to just look out for the QC on ebay as I've seen several go through there. Price and condition way in a major factor seeing that some of them folks seem mighty proud of the QC's there selling!!. Just don't see any of them as heavy built as mine!!. Don't know what to do??, make it or buy it??

.............................Allan:)

flyboyziel56
08-24-2011, 11:32 AM
I just uploaded the pictures on Photo Bucket. I hope this works. Below are the links:

http://i257.photobucket.com/albums/hh218/flyboyziel56/Picture862.jpg

http://i257.photobucket.com/albums/hh218/flyboyziel56/Picture861.jpg

http://i257.photobucket.com/albums/hh218/flyboyziel56/Picture863.jpg

http://i257.photobucket.com/albums/hh218/flyboyziel56/Picture864.jpg

Scottike
08-24-2011, 11:33 AM
You might try Joe at Plaza machinery for some parts, I know he has some Atlas stuff on his list.

http://www.plazamachinery.com/

Peter.
08-24-2011, 12:34 PM
Not nice to see any lathe get dropped on it's face :(

The tumbler lever is an easy repair with a bit of angle and spring-loaded plunger. Gerbox levers a bit more of a challenge but not too hard. Is the cross-slide screw bent?

JCHannum
08-24-2011, 12:48 PM
That is the later Atlas lathe. It and its sister Craftsman Commercial 12" lathe have some different parts than the earlier Atlas series and there might be some difficulties in fitting a QC gearbox if not from the proper series lathe. This will add to the difficulty and expense.

Parts lists are available on eBay for either machine and a comparison will show which parts are common. Atlas retained the same part number regardless of where it was used. I cobbled together a couple of basket case Atlas machines once to make one and ran into problems due to the thicker bed of the later machine. This changes the relation of the location of the lead screw to the rest of the lathe.

An early QC gear box might not fit, but the internals might be the same.

portlandRon
08-24-2011, 01:11 PM
How thick is the change gear casting?
I have one that is aprox. 11.9 mm (.465 inch) complete with spring loaded handle/stop assembly. It's yours for $5. plus shipping if you can use it.

gwilson
08-24-2011, 02:52 PM
I had that model lathe in 1974. I was glad to get rid of it and get a decently hefty 10" x 24" Jet. Took forever to machine mild steel with it. I'd advise not putting a lot of money into it for parts. The Jet would make a part in an hour that took most of a day to make with the Craftsman/Atlas.

The original guarantee with that lathe was that it would do work accurate to .001" ONE INCH from the chuck. That was truly about it!!:)Take the benefit of my real life experience,and get a heavier lathe. If not,you will find out for yourself the hard way.

gzig5
08-24-2011, 03:52 PM
I had that model lathe in 1974. I was glad to get rid of it and get a decently hefty 10" x 24" Jet. Took forever to machine mild steel with it. I'd advise not putting a lot of money into it for parts. The Jet would make a part in an hour that took most of a day to make with the Craftsman/Atlas.

The original guarantee with that lathe was that it would do work accurate to .001" ONE INCH from the chuck. That was truly about it!!:)Take the benefit of my real life experience,and get a heavier lathe. If not,you will find out for yourself the hard way.

He said he's got a Clausing, which is heavier. Every time the Atlas subject comes up you crap all over it. There are thousands of these machines out there doing excellent work. I know mine will hold much better than what you stated. Give it a break. This is HSM (HOME SHOP Machinist), not Practical Machinist. :rolleyes:

vpt
08-24-2011, 04:32 PM
That machine is newer then my 1942 atlas. As for the cross slide I was able to make a wheel and handle with the lathe for the lathe.

http://img189.imageshack.us/img189/9827/ebay015b.jpg

gwilson
08-24-2011, 06:22 PM
If you want an Atlas,fine with me. I also had one of their horizontal mills for a year,to. Would cut brass,so I sold it to a clock maker. I just try to give newbies the benefit of my experience with MINE.

I will say that the old model Atlas lathes,with the Art Deco headstocks,are very beautiful machines. So is the little bench mill. I have thought that if I could have reinforced the lathe in the center of its bed it would have been a lot more rigid. Found the Jet lathe before that,though.

The good news was that I bought my Craftsman NEW for $850.00 in 1974. In the next year or so,the price really went up,and I was able to sell it for more than I had paid. I sold it,still looking like new,to a motor repair shop which was good,as the lathe had originally been designed as an armature lathe.

flyboyziel56
08-24-2011, 09:35 PM
If you want an Atlas,fine with me. I also had one of their horizontal mills for a year,to. Would cut brass,so I sold it to a clock maker. I just try to give newbies the benefit of my experience with MINE.

I will say that the old model Atlas lathes,with the Art Deco headstocks,are very beautiful machines. So is the little bench mill. I have thought that if I could have reinforced the lathe in the center of its bed it would have been a lot more rigid. Found the Jet lathe before that,though.

The good news was that I bought my Craftsman NEW for $850.00 in 1974. In the next year or so,the price really went up,and I was able to sell it for more than I had paid. I sold it,still looking like new,to a motor repair shop which was good,as the lathe had originally been designed as an armature lathe.


Sorry to hear that your so down on Atlas lathe!!, As for the newbie I'm not!!. I do appreciate your experience tho, and find that anyone that has experience in operating a manual lathe or mill to be very rewarding. I have been in the machining business for around 10 years or so, give or take a year or so. I was a Welder before that and a Mechanic since. I worked for Caterpillar for 20 plus years. I find that the older American made lathes seem to hold up and hold there tolorances better then the chinese machine JMOHO!!. Not saying that the Chinese machine are worse, it's that I perfer American made Iron!!. I used to have a Southbend gap bed built in 1919, 1 year before the 1st WW ended. It was a 16x80 and leather belt driven. Quite the machine. What I'm driving at is everyone has there own reason for the type, size, drive, QC, lathe there wanting and mine just happened to be the 12" Atlas. It's not as heavy as my 4900 Clausing but it will suit my needs plus "I love a good restoration project". Mr Wilson again I'm sorry to hear you had such a bad time with yours, But I believe that they were into production to approach the Home Shop Machinist and Hobbiest, and produced thousands of these machines. No different then Southbend, Clausing, Logan, Smithy, just to name a few!!. Just depends on what you want to do with it?. Thanks for your imput...................................Allan:D

flyboyziel56
08-24-2011, 09:39 PM
How thick is the change gear casting?
I have one that is aprox. 11.9 mm (.465 inch) complete with spring loaded handle/stop assembly. It's yours for $5. plus shipping if you can use it.


Portlandron I don't know?, that's a great question!!. I'll go home later tonight and measure it. If it's the same I'll take it!!!. Plus shipping. and thank you very much!!!.......................................Alla n:D :D :D

flyboyziel56
08-24-2011, 09:49 PM
Not nice to see any lathe get dropped on it's face :(

The tumbler lever is an easy repair with a bit of angle and spring-loaded plunger. Gerbox levers a bit more of a challenge but not too hard. Is the cross-slide screw bent?


Good question Peter!!, I don't know because I have not gotton into it yet!!. The cross-slide I believe if it is bent is still salvagable!!. I had a simular problem on my 4900 cross-slide but it was the ACME was 2 different threads combined into one!!. I bought the threads from McMaster Carr and built it my self. Clausing wanted Soooooo much money for there ACME screw set up!!. I just built my own. Been working like a champ since!!. :D

MarkBall2
08-25-2011, 12:24 AM
Your quick change gear box is one of the later models. The handles are quite expensive from Clausing, but that's about 1/2 the price from Sears. (yes Sears still has replacement parts listed)

It might be less expensive & a faster repair to replace the complete gear box with one from e-bay. There you get gears, bolts & handles. Then use the one you have to repair the replacement if necessary.

If you decide to repair this one, more than likely you will need to replace the main shaft, because a fall onto the handles will bend the shaft the gears ride on. You probably also have damaged gears in there, as the reverse tumbler handle is also broken.

If you decide to replace it, the gears inside the box can be listed & sold to recover a few bux. I for one would be willing to purchase a gear or two out of it.

Either way, for the home shop it's a good lathe. Especially for the price. Mine was free.

vpt
08-25-2011, 10:38 AM
Not sure if you have to be a member or not to see the pics but I did post some pics of the breakdown I did on my box. May help you out with yours.

http://www.machinistweb.com/forum/showthread.php?t=993

MarkBall2
08-26-2011, 01:04 AM
VPT, did your gear box already have the bushings for the shafts? Or did you bore & put them in yourself?

I've broken a few gears on mine & was wondering if I needed to do a bushing repair on the main gear shaft.

If you installed the bushings, how did you "align" the bores on either end of the box? A long chucking reamer?

I need to do something, the price of gears are getting expensive.

vpt
08-28-2011, 11:45 AM
VPT, did your gear box already have the bushings for the shafts? Or did you bore & put them in yourself?

I've broken a few gears on mine & was wondering if I needed to do a bushing repair on the main gear shaft.

If you installed the bushings, how did you "align" the bores on either end of the box? A long chucking reamer?

I need to do something, the price of gears are getting expensive.


the box already had bushings, I just replaced the few that were a little loose. My box was actually in really good condition when I got it but just dirty with wood dust and grease. I only replaced the few bushings because I had the box apart and the right size bushings sitting around.

One of the bushings got to tight on the shaft after pressing it into the box so I had to use a reamer on the one bushing to loosen it up a bit. It was so close that I actually just turned the reamer by hand threw the bushing.