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View Full Version : OT: how to keep racoons away?



Elninio
08-24-2011, 06:28 PM
It's the second time this month that racoons (or maybe foxes) have eaten our pets (neighhors and I), this time it was a little kitten. The owners were away when the cats were out, the creature was found gutted on their driveway.

I've been told mothballs scare them away, but I never understood how that works and thus doubted it. Eagle statues have enough trouble keeping seaguls away, so why would mothballs work ...

Perhaps a high-pitch sound device?

lakeside53
08-24-2011, 06:36 PM
When that happens around here it's either coyotes or bobcats.

Best way to keep racoons away - remove food sources. I have a neighbor that feeds her cats outside - with unlimited food. Even though she tries, it's hard to deny the racoons are feasting when it snows (tracks) :)

Black_Moons
08-24-2011, 06:39 PM
Spray em with the hose whenever you see em. Thats how i got em to stay the hell away from my place.

Alternatively, Live traps. Release, far, far, FAR away.

And yes, remove food sources, and keep young cats indoors when not supervised if you can.

High pitched device will annoy the hell outta your cats/dogs too.

dalee100
08-24-2011, 06:49 PM
Hi,

Yeah, I would lean to 'yotes when small pets start to disappear. And they are far more likely to be found around human activities than bobcats. Bobcats tend to be more reclusive and less tolerant of human presence.

I have trapped, shot, and poisoned them, (back in the day). Coyotes are virtually impossible to totally eradicate from an area. They are very adaptable. With semi urban and even urban populations are on the rise. Your best defence is to keep small pets under close observation while outside and keep an eye out for signs of predators.

dalee

Mike Burdick
08-24-2011, 07:24 PM
As others have suggested, a live trap works very well...

http://www.havahart.com/resource/images/havahart/Product_Category_Headers/raccoon.jpghttp://www.havahart.com/resource/images/havahart/products/small/1079_s.jpg

http://www.havahart.com/store/live-animal-traps/raccoon

Other companies make them as well.

gzig5
08-24-2011, 07:25 PM
12ga with #4 shot if you are in the country....

HWooldridge
08-24-2011, 07:31 PM
Agreed - I have never seen or heard of coons killing and eating pets, but coyotes do it all the time. My wife and I live in a semi-rural area and have lost two large grown tomcats and a female pit bull to coyotes. The pit put up a good fight but she couldn't repel a dozen of them - I always go for payback when we hear them yelping...:D

Mcgyver
08-24-2011, 07:35 PM
with such a diverse crowd here, I'm surprise no one has suggested 'eat 'em'
:D

flylo
08-24-2011, 07:35 PM
Go to the local feed store & get fly bait(blue crystels for horses & cattle). dissolve crystles in a small amount of warm water. Then add Pepsi, you want it fizzzy. Put in alum pie plate. They love it & will drop dead right by the pan.:eek:

HWooldridge
08-24-2011, 07:45 PM
Go to the local feed store & get fly bait(blue crystels for horses & cattle). dissolve crystles in a small amount of warm water. Then add Pepsi, you want it fizzzy. Put in alum pie plate. They love it & will drop dead right by the pan.:eek:

Make sure no cats or dogs are around - they'll "love" it, too...

Dr Stan
08-24-2011, 08:22 PM
with such a diverse crowd here, I'm surprise no one has suggested 'eat 'em'
:D

Well I don't, but have know people that do. :p

As others have said racoons are difficult to get rid of if there is food, water & shelter. However, I too think this is most likely the work of coyotes as they adapt to urban areas quite well. To keep your pets safe, it is advisable to put them in at night.

huntinguy
08-24-2011, 08:29 PM
Spray em with the hose whenever you see em. Thats how i got em to stay the hell away from my place.

I did that, darn things came back for the next 5 days with a bar of soap and a wash cloth..... Seriously, I tried that trick for 5 days running... didn't work for the ones in my neighborhood.


Alternatively, Live traps. Release, far, far, FAR away.

Good thing you are up north. Down in the states, in most states, that will get you in LOTS of trouble. Can't move critters down here.


Agreed - I have never seen or heard of coons killing and eating pets

They do, I know a couple people that saw raccoons kill their dogs... not eat them but kill them. One dog was a Jack Russel (I believe) and the other was a Labrador.


but coyotes do it all the time.

I have watched coyotes hunt dogs many times. Kinda fun to watch, If you stop it before they get to the dog. Coyotes are VERY smart animals.

I have heard a 50lb bow and rubber blunts tend to keep the critters away. Can't say I have personally tried it... but so I have heard.

Mcgyver
08-24-2011, 09:58 PM
Well I don't, but have know people that do. :p
.

two stories. Once I was driving back from a weekend up north in the winter. On a back road, with big snow banks, it was fairly narrow. So this truck I'm following stops and i can't easily get by so i stop behind.....'my other brother Darryl' gets out grabs a dead coon he spotted on the side of the road and throws it in the back of the truck

wtf?

roadside frozen coon for dinner?



Second story. A guy I know, he's very old now, sort of a guys guy huntin & fishin bubba, used to go coon hunting with his posse. Worth a couple of hundred million but stil a country good old boy. As he told it, coon hunting is done by these sorts with dogs, lots of beer, flash lights and shot guns...at night. The dogs lead you to a tree, you shine the light up (I've never partaken) and blast away until no more coons fall out of the tree. Then, when you can't drink anymore, you throw them in the back of the pick up, drive down the concession and stuff one in everybody's mailbox. :eek: :eek: . Imagine finding that mess the next day going to check the mail?

maybe they were related to the coon eaters in the first story and thought they were doing a version of WKRP distributing Christmas turkeys?

Two more ideas on what to do with coons

flathead4
08-24-2011, 10:14 PM
It is usually best to remove the food source. Otherwise, live trap then shoot 'em in the head with a .22. Resist the temptation to use your shotgun. The yahoo that borrowed my live trap last time had to buy me a new one when he blew mine to smithereens with his 12 ga.

sasquatch
08-24-2011, 10:17 PM
Mcgyver, Comical posting!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:D

Wonder if they have yet instituted a racoon season in parts of Toronto?:eek:

Mcostello
08-24-2011, 10:27 PM
Bacon grease on a napkin seems irresistible.

Elninio
08-24-2011, 10:44 PM
with such a diverse crowd here, I'm surprise no one has suggested 'eat 'em'
:D

I got you on that,

but whatever killed it, left a bloody trail. The little cat gave it hell ..

Elninio
08-24-2011, 10:52 PM
It is usually best to remove the food source. Otherwise, live trap then shoot 'em in the head with a .22. Resist the temptation to use your shotgun. The yahoo that borrowed my live trap last time had to buy me a new one when he blew mine to smithereens with his 12 ga.

hahahahaha

Scottike
08-24-2011, 10:56 PM
Sounds like feeding seagulls Alka Seltzer to me. 'coons generally get along with house cats ok around here, I would tend towards coyotes or bobcat/couger in this part of the country, but with a kitten it could even be a neighborhood dog. I agree, don't leave a kitten unsupervised out doors, or even indoors for that matter (who knows what kind of mess they'll make).

Edit: A neighbor and good friend managed to catch a skunk in his garbage can one night - Killed it with his shotgun... in the can... on his patio... there wasn't enough tomato juice in town.

Arcane
08-24-2011, 10:59 PM
Just remember...if you get rid of the raccoons, you aren't going to be able to claim you accidentally shot your mother-in-law when you mistook her for one...

Tinkerer
08-24-2011, 11:01 PM
It's the second time this month that racoons (or maybe foxes) have eaten our pets (neighhors and I), this time it was a little kitten. The owners were away when the cats were out, the creature was found gutted on their driveway.

I've been told mothballs scare them away, but I never understood how that works and thus doubted it. Eagle statues have enough trouble keeping seaguls away, so why would mothballs work ...

Perhaps a high-pitch sound device?
Everyone always blames the raccoons. I've never had a raccoon hurt any cat or kitten... try and blend in with them yes. Now Opossums caught the bastard with a kitten in it jaws... beat the **** out of it with a log. Hate those evil red eyed bastards. And would bet that's what killed your neighbors as well.

lakeside53
08-24-2011, 11:06 PM
As much as I don't encourge them I won't go out of my way to hurt racoon, ever. I like having racoons and a plethora of other wildlife around.

And... after the coyotes, the the bighest predator of rats, kittens and rabbits here are the big owls.

Opossum caught a kitten? heck, most have been a slow (or dead) kitten - our possums are dumber than a post

lazlo
08-24-2011, 11:07 PM
Everyone always blames the raccoons. I've never had a raccoon hurt any cat or kitten...

I've never heard of that either. They're amazingly clever at getting into locked trashcans though.

We had to shoot a couple of raccoons in Richmond back in the late 90's -- there was a wave of rabies running through them. It's a shame, and a bit frightful, to see a rabid raccoon-- looks all ratty and staggers like it's drunk. Very aggressive.

For some reason, raccoon seem especially susceptible to rabies...

dp
08-24-2011, 11:12 PM
We feed them so much cat food they don't feel the need to be territorial. We recently adopted (or rather, were adopted by) a young cat that had been living among the 5 raccoon families we currently support.

This time of year, though, the young raccoons are feeling independent and less needful of mum's protection, and will fight with other families of raccoons, and will probably also take on a leashed dog or tree a cat. And since raccoons can go up a tree as well as any cat, that treed cat is probably a goner.

I haven't seen any evidence of pet kills in close to 30 years when I first moved in here and didn't know there were raccoons in the area. I had two outdoor cats that both turned up dead. One shot by my neighbor and the other killed by a raccoon or coyote. We don't see so many coyote here anymore, but once did. We have a lot more raccoons now, and no opossums. I keep hoping the coyotes will return.

This is zip code 98007 just a few miles from the Microsoft offices, 10 minutes commute from the city core. http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ll=47.610543,-122.142426&spn=0.138874,0.235519&t=k&z=12&vpsrc=0

38_Cal
08-24-2011, 11:16 PM
Just remember...if you get rid of the raccoons, you aren't going to be able to claim you accidentally shot your mother-in-law when you mistook her for one...
And WHAT was your mother-in-law doing in that tree? :eek:

David

Elninio
08-24-2011, 11:37 PM
Everyone always blames the raccoons. I've never had a raccoon hurt any cat or kitten... try and blend in with them yes. Now Opossums caught the bastard with a kitten in it jaws... beat the **** out of it with a log. Hate those evil red eyed bastards. And would bet that's what killed your neighbors as well.

True, but ...

in one incident, i went out back, leaving my cat on the front porch - 4 minutes later when i came back it was surrounded by four racoons, and it wasn't even dark outside yet. Perhaps there's a geographical difference between the agressivenes of racoons?

jkilroy
08-24-2011, 11:39 PM
A .22 to the head does the trick every time, you don't mess up the meat.

Well prepared Racoon IS quite tasty, and has even been served in the White House. At one time, not all that long ago, Coon was considered a very nice meal all over this country.

Elninio
08-24-2011, 11:40 PM
A .22 to the head does the trick every time, you don't mess up the meat.

Well prepared Racoon IS quite tasty, and has even been served in the White House. At one time, not all that long ago, Coon was considered a very nice meal all over this country.

Cool! I think I've seen beef jerky 'coon too, but that's for different reasons ...

http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2009/01/13/59566/the-other-dark-meat-raccoon-is.html

According to this article, racoon rabies is an east-coast phenomena. I wonder if their aggressiveness is like the african-bees-versus-european-bees phenomena (african bees are much more aggressive, and are driving the european bees extinct [and if im not mistaken, the european bees produce more honey])

Boucher
08-24-2011, 11:44 PM
I have recently had some aggravation from a raccoon resulting from food left out trying to gentile down a feral cat. I will try the bacon grease on a napkin and report back. I was going to bait a trap tonight. I normally use some cheap sardines for raccoon bait but didn't have any and being a cheapskate was not going to feed them tuna. Racoons are stronger and tougher critter than most people realize but they are not normally very agressive. I have known of them killing grown jackrabbits and squirrels when they were hungry. We are having a Rabies problem here righ now.

An observation--- Catching a feral cat in a live trap is counter productive if the objective is to gentle them down.

alanganes
08-24-2011, 11:44 PM
I know almost everyone has done it, but at least be aware that in many places it is illegal to relocate a wild animal form one place to another without permits, blah, blah, blah.

There is actually some logic behind that, and the likelihood of "getting caught" doing it is pretty slim, but if you happen to be unfortunate enough to be spotted in the act doing so, fines and such can be pretty severe. Again, this varies a lot depending upon where you are. Just be aware...

lakeside53
08-24-2011, 11:59 PM
True, but ...

in one incident, i went out back, leaving my cat on the front porch - 4 minutes later when i came back it was surrounded by four racoons, and it wasn't even dark outside yet. Perhaps there's a geographical difference between the agressivenes of racoons?


I have seen that... on my own deck, but the cats/coons seem to figure it all out. Cats and coon have been doing the dance for a very long time, and we only get the occasional peek at what goes on. If only cats would speak to us about what they get up to ;)

Pherdie
08-25-2011, 12:18 AM
I have plenty of critters around me and I've never heard of raccoons preying on cats, however, the presence of foxes was mentioned and they will eat cats. Several foxes (and many coyotes) have been seen in my area carting off cats.

I currently have a raccoon problem with them digging in landscaped areas and pulling up low voltage lighting wiring (caught them on a wildlife camera). I'm considering using a chemical that emulates the scent of coyote urine. It is available locally. I used the chemical on vole infested areas and the results were nothing less than phenomenal. Maybe the same will hold true for raccoons.

macona
08-25-2011, 12:58 AM
I get a lot of raccoons around here. I wish they would eat the strays, they are less annoying than the cats.

I really doubt it was a raccoon. They can kill a dog, but that happens as a last resort, like when they are cornered.

RichardG
08-25-2011, 02:19 AM
Coyotes will gut and eat the insides of small animals . Raccoons will carry them off and eat most of them . We have both here and the coyotes are the ones that do the most damage . We had a sort of ferral cat and she would eat with the raccoons and could hold her own with them. A lot of times you will not even know you have coyotes around they are very smart and sneaky. There are coyotes that live in downtown Seattle most people never know they are there.
Richard

Boostinjdm
08-25-2011, 04:18 AM
I get a lot of raccoons around here. I wish they would eat the strays

X2 Way too many strays...

Jim Shaper
08-25-2011, 05:09 AM
Coons are nest robbers. If you want birds, you don't want coons. Personally, I have way too many coons and not enough turkey, so the coons are dead.

I've got a shop project for dog-proof coon traps right now. They run $12 a pop retail, I'll have $12 in 20 of them unless chain prices went up (I haven't gotten it yet).

I hope to use the spoils of my coon eradication to take out a yote who's been making off with my tree rats and bunnies. I also have a Fisher that's on my hit list as well (both caught on trail cams). Once I tag out on deer, the war is on in my woods.

Coon crap has wicked parasites in it. You don't want them around. I personally run a live trap in my back yard (suburbs) several months a year to make sure any in the area are eliminated (I have toddlers next door and have witnessed them eating dirt). This year I'm at a slow start with 1 after 2 weeks, last year I caught 3 in a single weekend - all over 25# (rounded out the fall with 9; smallest one was 16#). I use a raw egg and they love it. They also love marshmallows, and those are often used to keep birds from eating bait out of DP traps.

http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/volunteer/janfeb02/fn_raccoon.html

1000fps air rifle in the soft belly of their chest. .22lr in the head would be better, but I can't pull that off in the metro so I make due with the pellet gun.

In the city, I wouldn't eat them. Think of what they're living on and ask yourself if you want to ingest that? Not to mention, they might have already sucked down someone else's poison but hadn't croaked yet when you caught them. Out in the country where they have a more natural diet, then I'd be ok with cooking one, but I haven't tried it yet.

mike4
08-25-2011, 05:50 AM
I know almost everyone has done it, but at least be aware that in many places it is illegal to relocate a wild animal form one place to another without permits, blah, blah, blah.

There is actually some logic behind that, and the likelihood of "getting caught" doing it is pretty slim, but if you happen to be unfortunate enough to be spotted in the act doing so, fines and such can be pretty severe. Again, this varies a lot depending upon where you are. Just be aware...

If you turn them into road kill without getting caught it stops them from returning.
Methods vary with size of pest and locality.
Michael

Your Old Dog
08-25-2011, 07:45 AM
We live in the country surrounded by corn fields at the moment. The creek is about 300 yards behind the house. My neighbor tells me she saw 5 or 6 coyotes back by the woodline at the creek the other day. I read up on them as we have a Lab who is a house dog but spends lot of time outside. If I read it correctly, I can shoot coyotes out of season if they become a nuisance. I plan to do just that if they come on my property. Jake is family and I'll take a fine before I'll let anything happen to him that I can stop.

In the past two years I've killed a rabid coon (staggering and bold) and bald fox (mangy) in the back yard with my 20 gauge.

Jim Shaper
08-25-2011, 08:19 AM
A yote in range, is a dead yote here. They're unprotected in MN for a reason.

We also have provisions for "is causing, or is about to cause damage" in our game laws - being present means they're about to cause damage to me. You can't keep game animals killed under that provision, but I'm not shooting them to poach in the first place.

Your laws may differ. Call your Conservation Officer if you have any questions after reading up on the statutes.

lwalker
08-25-2011, 03:29 PM
That's interesting to know. About two years ago, I lost a chicken in exactly that way: it was gutted, inside the fenced-in pen, but outside the coop one evening when I left the gate open. The other chickens weren't harmed at all. I closed the gate after dark, but didn't notice the dead bird until the next morning.

I've lost chickens to raccoons since, but in those cases, the entire animal was dragged off into the trees, probably squawking and fighting, leaving a trail of feathers...

Always wondered why that one bird was just eaten on the inside. We do get coyotes coming close to the house sometimes, but I figured that if it was a coyote I'd have lost more than just the one hen.



Coyotes will gut and eat the insides of small animals . Raccoons will carry them off and eat most of them . We have both here and the coyotes are the ones that do the most damage . We had a sort of ferral cat and she would eat with the raccoons and could hold her own with them. A lot of times you will not even know you have coyotes around they are very smart and sneaky. There are coyotes that live in downtown Seattle most people never know they are there.
Richard

Boostinjdm
08-25-2011, 08:11 PM
.22lr in the head would be better, but I can't pull that off in the metro so I make due with the pellet gun.


I keep my pistol handy when I let the dog out at night. I've already informed the neighbors that I will shoot anything that approaches my dog. Coon, cat, dog, coyote, etc. I live on the edge of a small town with 5 acres of corn out back so I do get some critters.

Mcostello
08-25-2011, 10:56 PM
Friend had a ST. Bernard on the farm. Went out one evening and 2 coons were dragging it to his pond and attempting to drown it. Naturally him being a gun nut meant that the guns were all locked up safe in the house. Had to run into the house and shoot at them from afar, scared them off with no casualties on either side.

Black_Moons
08-25-2011, 11:03 PM
Friend had a ST. Bernard on the farm. Went out one evening and 2 coons were dragging it to his pond and attempting to drown it. Naturally him being a gun nut meant that the guns were all locked up safe in the house. Had to run into the house and shoot at them from afar, scared them off with no casualties on either side.

Im calling bull! unless that thing was a puppy, or seriously underfed/cross breed with a chiwawa!

I had a ST Bernard. When that dog decided to sit down on a walk, you could lean 45 degrees back, supported by the leash, And after 5 minutes all the dog would do is growl at you slightly. Then you'd stop pulling.

a full grown man might of been able to drag him, But theres no physical way in hell two 30lb animals could even get enough traction to pull him anywhere.

And what was the dog doing during all this? sleeping? Because I doubt my dog would of even noticed a racoon trying to move him. Doubt a racoon would of surived if my dog did notice one trying to carry him off.

J. Randall
08-25-2011, 11:25 PM
It is probably possible, but I doubt it was a coon. Any predator animal that killed it for food would not have left it lay, you would have just found blood. My guess is it was more likely a wandering dog.
James

TGTool
08-26-2011, 12:02 AM
No help on keeping them away because they hang out here, but I can give advice on the opposite. This was quite a chance discovery, but some fish emulsion fertilizer in the potted plants on the walk got them all dug up. More than once. Some four or five times! I've now got the most vulnerable pots on the roof where I climb the ladder each day with a water bucket. :mad:

I'm saving the rest of the fertilizer for the garden. Half in the fall so the little devils will turn and dig in all the dead vines and plants, and the other half in the spring to get the area tilled for planting.

I recollect hearing that when the first Europeans arrived in North America the natives showed them how to fertilize the corn hills by burying fish in the hill to feed the plants. I'm wondering now if I might not be able to do something just as productive by burying raccoons in the vegetable garden. :D

Black_Moons
08-26-2011, 12:52 AM
I recollect hearing that when the first Europeans arrived in North America the natives showed them how to fertilize the corn hills by burying fish in the hill to feed the plants. I'm wondering now if I might not be able to do something just as productive by burying raccoons in the vegetable garden. :D

Maybe the indians where really smart and used the racoons to till the soil too. They just did'nt let onto that part yet because 'These advanced europeans must be able to figure out something that simple on thier own' :)