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J S Machine
08-26-2011, 08:10 AM
Just finished this one up.

It's called a swayback wharncliffe, and is probably not what you may be used to seeing. I hated the shape and design at first, but it has grown on me...Turned out to be a real pain to make, just because it isn't shaped like the more common ones. All the geometry is different..

http://i226.photobucket.com/albums/dd198/JSMachine/knives/swfinal.jpg

It has fossil mammoth tooth handle scales from Siberia (last ice age), 410 bolsters and liners, and a 15N20/1095 Damascus blade.

Thanks for looking

Tait
08-26-2011, 08:20 AM
That's beautiful.

There are screws in the scales, but none apparently in the bolster. Are the screws for removing the scales without disassembling the knife?

Carld
08-26-2011, 08:43 AM
Nice job and it does look a little different but still pleasing to the eye.

J S Machine
08-26-2011, 08:44 AM
That's beautiful.

There are screws in the scales, but none apparently in the bolster. Are the screws for removing the scales without disassembling the knife?

Screws are used here because the mammoth tooth is so brittle. the normal pins are there - the one in the middle of the back spring and the one in the rear of the handle; they are just hidden. They are ground flat with the liners. If I were to have brought them up through the scales like most slip joints and peened (piened?) everything there, the expanding pins may have cracked or busted the tooth. The stuff is somewhat like rock, because it is in a fossilized state.

Tony
08-26-2011, 08:47 AM
Incredible!
That looks more like a fine art painting.

Nice work.

gwilson
08-26-2011, 09:35 AM
I like this design. Very clean work.

dp
08-26-2011, 09:39 AM
It can't be long before the thinking behind this curse of luthiers comes to a mammoth tooth near you:

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424053111904787404576530520471223268.html

lazlo
08-26-2011, 09:44 AM
It can't be long before the thinking behind this curse of luthiers comes to a mammoth tooth near you:

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424053111904787404576530520471223268.html

That's already an issue in the knifemaking world. A lot of the high-end (i.e., $2, -$3,000) knives use "pre-ban" ivory. Apparently the paper trail for pre-ban ivory is sketchy, at best, and forged, at worst.

That's why many have switched to "fossil" mammoth ivory and teeth. There hasn't been a live mammoth in 100,000 years, so it's pretty obviously not poached.

Here's a gorgeous presentation bowie from Dr. Fred Carter. "Pre-ban" ivory handle:

http://www.knifepurveyor.com/images/content/A%20fred_carter_bowie_open_L.jpg

A close-up on Carter's engraving (inlaid with gold!) -- unbelievable:

http://www.knifepurveyor.com/images/content/A%20fred_carter_bowie_spine_butt_L.jpg

J S Machine
08-26-2011, 10:49 AM
That's already an issue in the knifemaking world. A lot of the high-end (i.e., $2, -$3,000) knives use "pre-ban" ivory. Apparently the paper trail for pre-ban ivory is sketchy, at best, and forged, at worst.

That's why many have switched to "fossil" mammoth ivory and teeth. There hasn't been a live mammoth in 100,000 years, so it's pretty obviously not poached.

Here's a gorgeous presentation bowie from Dr. Fred Carter. "Pre-ban" ivory handle:

http://www.knifepurveyor.com/images/content/A%20fred_carter_bowie_open_L.jpg

A close-up on Carter's engraving (inlaid with gold!) -- unbelievable:

http://www.knifepurveyor.com/images/content/A%20fred_carter_bowie_spine_butt_L.jpg

Good looking bowie.

Yes, the ivory stuff is fine as long as it is pre-ban, but I have never used any of it. I wanted to pick some of it up at blade show this year, but I couldn't find a piece cheap enough..lol. The stuff is expensive, and the pre-ban stuff is dwindling in numbers.

I probably won't use mammoth tooth again unless someone specifically asks for it. It is not easy to work with and not very forgiving.

dp
08-26-2011, 11:13 AM
That's already an issue in the knifemaking world. A lot of the high-end (i.e., $2, -$3,000) knives use "pre-ban" ivory. Apparently the paper trail for pre-ban ivory is sketchy, at best, and forged, at worst.

That's why many have switched to "fossil" mammoth ivory and teeth. There hasn't been a live mammoth in 100,000 years, so it's pretty obviously not poached.

The problem isn't poaching - the problem is scarcity and regulations regarding indiscriminate use of materials deemed threatened. In the case of some of these hardwoods it is clearly an attempt to drive up prices, and based on the penalties for possessing these materials, they mean to be pre-emptive in a serious way. I see no reason why rare fossils would be exempted from regulation for the craftsman's axe. Someone somewhere is convinced such articles are world treasures.

Mammoths were strolling the world just 12,000 years ago and they were killed of by, are you ready for it? Trees :)

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/05/ice-age.html

Mcgyver
08-26-2011, 01:45 PM
It can't be long before the thinking behind this curse of luthiers comes to a mammoth tooth near you:

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424053111904787404576530520471223268.html

wow, your country is the same as ours....all the bad guys have been caught and law enforcement just doesn't know what to do with itself. I read things like that is and kind of gives me a police state shiver

nice work JS!

lazlo
08-26-2011, 02:20 PM
The problem isn't poaching - the problem is scarcity and regulations regarding indiscriminate use of materials deemed threatened. In the case of some of these hardwoods it is clearly an attempt to drive up prices, and based on the penalties for possessing these materials

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/05/ice-age.html

I'm not getting that from the article Dennis:


"The question in the first raid seemed to be whether Gibson had been buying illegally harvested hardwoods from protected forests, such as the Madagascar ebony that makes for such lovely fretboards. And if Gibson did knowingly import illegally harvested ebony from Madagascar, that wouldn't be a negligible offense. Peter Lowry, ebony and rosewood expert at the Missouri Botanical Garden, calls the Madagascar wood trade the "equivalent of Africa's blood diamonds."


Still, musicians cling to the old materials. Last year, Dick Boak, director of artist relations for C.F. Martin & Co., complained to Mother Nature News about the difficulty of getting elite guitarists to switch to instruments made from sustainable materials. "Surprisingly, musicians, who represent some of the most savvy, ecologically minded people around, are resistant to anything about changing the tone of their guitars," he said.

You could mark that up to hypocrisy—artsy do-gooders only too eager to tell others what kind of light bulbs they have to buy won't make sacrifices when it comes to their own passions.

dp
08-26-2011, 10:42 PM
Lazlo - you can still buy all of that kind of wood you'll ever need but now you pay premium price and you get a record of birth line with it. And it is the regulation that make a thing scarce. And as the article says, don't take your classic wooden instrument on the road or you may end up leaving it there.

Years ago my brother was making custom pistol and revolver grips from exotic woods. He's passed away but out in his shop there is still a hell of a lot of board feet of exotic, and now illegal wood, and his widow has only the option of quietly burning it to be rid of it.

And McGyver reminded me of my bad manners - J S that's a drop dead gorgeous knife!