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View Full Version : DIY simple truck ramps - ideas?



Metalmelter
09-01-2011, 09:39 AM
Just looking for some simple ideas for truck ramps. I'm leaning towards 8ft long 2X8's or 2X10's which would easily fit inside the 8ft bed I have. My SuperDuty truck sits a bit tall and just leaning the boards on the tail gate is not the best idea. I know they make those brackets you can bolt to the boards but I figured I ask what you guys may have come up with to secure the boards to the tailgate or bed while rolling a heavy load on the planks. Have any pics of what you made??? ;)

sasquatch
09-01-2011, 10:18 AM
2x8 or 2x10's???

I think that would be a waste of time and effort.

You can buy light aluminum ramps for not that much money with the max load rating on them.

I'm, presuming your'e going to be carrying these ramps around and using them often?

flylo
09-01-2011, 10:19 AM
If you don't mind drilling 4 holes on the inside of the top of the tailgate do that & just have 4 bolts or pins to drop thru the board into the tailgate.

T.Hoffman
09-01-2011, 10:30 AM
My SuperDuty truck sits a bit tall and just leaning the boards on the tail gate is not the best idea. I know they make those brackets you can bolt to the boards...

VERY bad idea just to lean boards on the tailgate. I know many people do it- but bad idea. I've seen a bad occurrance happen when guys have done that, the boards shifted back a bit and it wasn't pretty.

The brackets that mount on the boards are WAY better than nothing. But I have a shorter-box Supercrew truck (6ft bed) and wanted ramps that I could put in the bed with tailgate up. I bought some folding ramps that fit in my bed, hold 1500lbs nicely, aluminum light weight. Never looked back- and quite happy with them. They also make the same version in steel that will hold 2000lbs but quite a bit heavier.

In the long run of having them for the foreseeable future, the money is well spent for safety's sake, peace of mind, portability, and convenience compared to the time/material/effort you'd put in making up something yourself.

firbikrhd1
09-01-2011, 10:44 AM
Whatever you choose to do, purchase or manufacture your own ramps, you might want to consider ramps that aren't straight but rather have a "hump" in them. In many cases, depending on wheel base of the equipment being loaded straight ramps can cause "high centering" on the lowest parts of the equipment as the first wheels to go in the bed move forward and the second wheels are still low on the ramp.
Unless you just want a project you can purchase some pretty nice aluminum ramps with humps for little more than the material alone will cost, especially if you watch for sales or promotions.

psomero
09-01-2011, 10:51 AM
If you don't mind drilling 4 holes on the inside of the top of the tailgate do that & just have 4 bolts or pins to drop thru the board into the tailgate.


this system worked flawlessly for my father and I on his old Ford Ranger when we had a dirtbike to haul to the local motorcycle park.

you may want to hit the raw edges of the holes with some sort of corrosion inhibitor to protect the base metal. we didn't, but then again, that it was getting hard to discern where the red paint ended and the red rust took over...

Metalmelter
09-01-2011, 11:03 AM
All good points guys! I was just curious to see what others have done in general since we are a bunch that tend to make things on here ;)

Dawai
09-01-2011, 11:32 AM
I was sitting on the tailgate on my 78 el camino, the dog jumped onto it to sit next to me. The straps holding the tailgate both broke. I got off it before it Destroyed the sheetmetal against the bumper. (don't laugh, that's only 400lbs..) My pup weighed 99.5 to be precise.

Anything that loads onto the tailgate hangs on the "straps" or cables.. Mine being rusted where the car-truck-thing had the tailgate up all them years of storage, they failed.

SEE the neato-smacko-Motorcycle Loader on the Miller welding site, a tiny winch, a trolley that goes onto the ground and up into the truck. Allows a person to Load a big motorcycle by himself.. or lawnmower.. modify it to suit your needs..

http://www.millerwelds.com/interests/projects/ideagallery/project/966794916/ Loader link..

lynnl
09-01-2011, 11:40 AM
I bought a pair of the bracket ends from an auto parts store (forgotten which one) for $20 something, and bolted them on to the ends of yellow pine 2 x 12's. Had to saw off a couple of inches so they would fit straight and flat in my 8' p/u bed.

Works fine for my VERY occasional use.
Granted, the aluminum factory mades are not that expensive, but then there's the storage issue. Storage space is very dear to me nowadays.

BUT YES!! DO NOT simply lay the ends of the boards on the tailgate. A few years ago I was doing that with some regularity. Got away with it ok for a long while. Then sure enough, one day one slipped off at just the wrong moment while I was on it. Would've been better if both slipped.
I have no proof; there were no witnesses. But I know I successfully levitated for a good 2 or 3 seconds before finally giving up and taking a rolling tumble on my concrete driveway. Only minor injuries, but I was lucky - could've easily broken a leg ..or two. I think my conscious decision to go down in a roll saved me.

Chester
09-01-2011, 02:56 PM
Anyone on this side interested in these ramps............from Princess Auto's latest flyer $157.99.

http://www.princessauto.com/trailer/truck/truck-accessories/loading-ramps/8287336-100-x-12-arched-bi-fold-steel-ramps

noah katz
09-01-2011, 04:40 PM
Get some from Harbor Freight with the 20% off coupon.

C - ROSS
09-01-2011, 07:45 PM
Made my own brackets and used them for several years. One problem is that the wood will not give you any traction, often get half way up and then have to push.

Broke down and spent a little of my cash for new AL ramps that fold in the center, nicer to use and safe also.

Ross

Chris S.
09-01-2011, 08:11 PM
Well, this is a timely topic. An HSM member popped over my place today and I pushed large JET dust collector up two 2*10s into his panel truck. When done my wife said "I thought any moment you and that thing were going down! Didn't you feel those boards flexing and bouncing?!" Well, to be honest... yeah! Didn't like it much either! :D On the other hand, a (fold-able & lockable) vertical support, about half way up the ramp would cure that. It would also take much of the load off the tailgate. ;)

jdunmyer
09-01-2011, 10:06 PM
I made a pair of ramps from 2, 2X12 cottonwood planks from my sawmill. (full 2" thick) Used a pair of 12" "ramp ends" from Tractor Supply Co., hadda do a bit of milling of the planks to make them fit, as they're meant for 1 1/2" planks.

I regularly load my electric golf cart, packed with 300# or so of tools, for the trip to Buckley, MI. Of course, I'm driving it up the ramps. The boards are 9' long, so stick out the rear of the p/u bed.

FWIW:

Hogridnfool
09-02-2011, 01:44 AM
Get some from Harbor Freight with the 20% off coupon.Got these from the local HF store for $35 and a coupon. http://www.harborfreight.com/2-piece-steel-loading-ramps-44649.html

Bill736
09-02-2011, 02:11 AM
I was sitting on the tailgate on my 78 el camino, the dog jumped onto it to sit next to me. The straps holding the tailgate both broke. I got off it before it Destroyed the sheetmetal against the bumper. (don't laugh, that's only 400lbs..) My pup weighed 99.5 to be precise.

Anything that loads onto the tailgate hangs on the "straps" or cables.. Mine being rusted where the car-truck-thing had the tailgate up all them years of storage, they failed.

SEE the neato-smacko-Motorcycle Loader on the Miller welding site, a tiny winch, a trolley that goes onto the ground and up into the truck. Allows a person to Load a big motorcycle by himself.. or lawnmower.. modify it to suit your needs..

http://www.millerwelds.com/interests/projects/ideagallery/project/966794916/ Loader link..

Dawai- That rusted and weak tailgate cable problem didn't go away after 1978, oddly enough. My 2000 GMC pickup had a recall on the exact same problem. I bought a new pair at NAPA , but now I always feel uneasy standing on the tailgate ! The folding steel strap type are probably better, since you can see rust better than inside of a crimped cable end.

Chris S.
09-02-2011, 09:36 AM
Got these from the local HF store for $35 and a coupon. http://www.harborfreight.com/2-piece-steel-loading-ramps-44649.html

Ha, the prices at HF can sometimes make DIY solutions impractical! ;) What does a 2x12x8 go for these days?

Chris

Dawai
09-02-2011, 09:48 AM
NOT to mention the PT lumber I used is now rotten.. It is not PT anymore I think, or it's made with worm wood?? I think they use citrus instead of tar cresote? based products to seal it.

A ramp is always slippery, painting it with sand in the paint is a good idea too.. if there is two places you mostly use ramps, I suggest you build two permanent ones. (FUN for a band to get up on and play too).

I'd like to have a thing like a ambulance gurney, lays on ground for loading, uses a $39 jack to raise, then legs collapse as it loads onto truck.

One of you geniuses design it, and I'll try to build it.
I gooed over the Miller welds site "raise" toolbox-headache rack.. was thinking.. yeah.. I can do a few more tricks with that..

Chris S.
09-02-2011, 10:16 AM
NOT to mention the PT lumber I used is now rotten.. It is not PT anymore I think, or it's made with worm wood?? I think they use citrus instead of tar cresote? based products to seal it.


This was brought to us by the mental midget radicals at the EPA. An agency that needs to be neutered!:mad:

Chris

noah katz
09-02-2011, 03:21 PM
Those are the ones I have too.

They don't rust, have grippy surface features, and come in handy as scaffolding by putting on a couple of saw horses.


Got these from the local HF store for $35 and a coupon. http://www.harborfreight.com/2-piece-steel-loading-ramps-44649.html

huntinguy
09-02-2011, 10:42 PM
Whatever you choose to do, purchase or manufacture your own ramps, you might want to consider ramps that aren't straight but rather have a "hump" in them. In many cases, depending on wheel base of the equipment being loaded straight ramps can cause "high centering" on the lowest parts of the equipment as the first wheels to go in the bed move forward and the second wheels are still low on the ramp.
Unless you just want a project you can purchase some pretty nice aluminum ramps with humps for little more than the material alone will cost, especially if you watch for sales or promotions.

Exactly. Had a devil of a time loading a riding lawn mower into the back of my pickup using these http://www.harborfreight.com/2-piece-steel-loading-ramps-44649.html I think the hump type might make it easier.

I did finally over come the problem by putting the front of the truck on car ramps them putting the loading ramps on the back... still hit but made it in.

Also, the HF ramps above are short and that adds to the high-centering problem. Short ramps are a bad thing. The place I took the mower to for repair had 8 or 10 foot ramps that strapped down to the truck bumper so they couldn't slide. they were wonderful...