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View Full Version : We don't need no stinkin' badges!"



Chris S.
09-03-2011, 09:57 AM
Evidently, they don't need no stinkin OSHA either! :D

I love the "Can do!", "I have a limited budget.", "I can fabricate that!", attitude though. Check out the shop made independent jaw chuck.

The long sleeves are a nice touch! :eek:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0PnO2YTSezg&feature=player_detailpage

bborr01
09-03-2011, 10:10 AM
Nice FLOPPY, LOOSE sleeves. No safety committee in that shop.

Too bad the guy didn't see Blackforest's thread about parting off with a sawzall. He could probably cut a half second off his cycle time.

But seriously now, the video shows that with a little ingenuity, a person can accomplish tasks without a lot of high $$$$ machinery.

Brian

2ManyHobbies
09-03-2011, 10:19 AM
Looks like someone fashioned a wood lathe and duplicator from whatever scraps may have been available that day. Profitable business making chess pieces?

Bravo and keep up the good work.

chriskat
09-03-2011, 10:24 AM
Very cool, wonder what he's making?

Tony Ennis
09-03-2011, 10:25 AM
I thought the duplicator was clever. Note the hose clamp stop to prevent him from moving the cutter into the chuck.

*thumbsup*

edit - it looks like he was making some sort of game piece. I think if he were making a Staunton-pattern chess set his pattern would have been more recognizable.

Scottike
09-03-2011, 10:40 AM
Very "We can get there from here", I really liked the "Collet?" and his centering technique.

Tony Ennis
09-03-2011, 10:45 AM
I bet it's harder than he made it look.

Chris S.
09-03-2011, 11:52 AM
But seriously now, the video shows that with a little ingenuity, a person can accomplish tasks without a lot of high $$$$ machinery.

Brian

Yeah, and it also demonstrates how a machine dedicated to do one task (even a junk bin concoction) can do it so much more efficiently. ;)

Chris

wierdscience
09-03-2011, 11:56 AM
Airsmith Espanol?:D


Can't fault him,he's doing what it takes to make a living in an honest trade.

I give him definite points for the duplicator,pretty ingenious.

RussZHC
09-03-2011, 12:08 PM
Agree with the "making a living" posts...question, from a safety standpoint, is it not better to have the duplicator in front?

Going from my noob experiences, so far, does not one tend to follow what the action of the duplicator is (i.e. your eyes follow, "search" to track, the contact on the sample piece) and so if the sample has the lathe axis/chuck between you and the sample, and you look more closely/lean in...more dangerous? In front you could look and still be away from the spinning stuff.

Carld
09-03-2011, 12:09 PM
Yes, he's making money while others are thinking about it. It takes a creative mind to do things like that. Some day he will wear shorter sleeves if he survives after the accident. Been there and survived and no loose sleeves for me.

Scottike
09-03-2011, 12:16 PM
We all know the long sleeves are a no no, but he probably has to use the motor for the lathe as a hand warmer in the winter.

edit: teeshirt + sweatshirt + motorbike = chilly

Chris S.
09-03-2011, 12:54 PM
Agree with the "making a living" posts...question, from a safety standpoint, is it not better to have the duplicator in front?

Going from my noob experiences, so far, does not one tend to follow what the action of the duplicator is (i.e. your eyes follow, "search" to track, the contact on the sample piece) and so if the sample has the lathe axis/chuck between you and the sample, and you look more closely/lean in...more dangerous? In front you could look and still be away from the spinning stuff.

This is funny! :D :confused: :rolleyes:

lazlo
09-03-2011, 01:26 PM
Airsmith Espanol?:D

LOL!


Can't fault him,he's doing what it takes to make a living in an honest trade.
I give him definite points for the duplicator,pretty ingenious.

Agree on both accounts, but I winced when he kept reaching over the spinning junkyard 4-jaw chuck, with long sleeves, no less.

loose nut
09-03-2011, 01:35 PM
We all know the long sleeves are a no no, but he probably has to use the motor for the lathe as a hand warmer in the winter.

They are now.

Lab coats and ties where the norm years ago but things have changed in some parts of the world not so much in others. I bet there isn't an OSHA man telling him that he can't use a paper slip to pick up an edge because his fingers get to close to the rotating cutter.

Your Old Dog
09-03-2011, 01:38 PM
Is that a bullet hole in the sweat shirt near his naval?

These post are good for me. Tells me not to keep saying I can't do something because I don't have this or that. I really enjoyed the post a year or so ago of the guy making wind mill water pumps for some indigent country. Imagine what guys like that could do with my Rung Foo :D

lazlo
09-03-2011, 01:46 PM
Lab coats and ties where the norm years ago

...and no safety glasses.

http://cache2.artprintimages.com/LRG/36/3630/ONWEF00Z.jpg


but things have changed in some parts of the world

That's because they didn't have a chance to reproduce before they were wrapped around the spindle :p

John Stevenson
09-03-2011, 02:01 PM
Well I watched the video twice and even played it back a few times.
What I saw was someone who was very skilled at making this particular part with the minimum of equipment.

OK so he has long sleeves on but I didn't see anywhere in the video where he put himself in any danger, even when cutting off his arms were well clear of the chuck.

Even got shots of his hands and counted all his fingers :D

I'm sure we all do things worse than this on a daily basis even if it's not machine related, sorry all I see is many folk over reacting.

Ironheart
09-03-2011, 02:11 PM
When there are no rules the imagination is free to run wild.

At one time you could see things like that here. My father built
a table saw out of a wood table and some pillow blocks. As
a kid I thought it was great. Now I wonder why we still have
all of our fingers...

My best wishes go out to the young man. If I could speak his languish
I would leave a comment advising him to roll his sleeves.

Ironheart...

Black Forest
09-03-2011, 02:24 PM
I think that was Sir John's latin division. When the camera panned around his shop I thought of Sir John immediately!

kendall
09-03-2011, 02:35 PM
Agree with the "making a living" posts...question, from a safety standpoint, is it not better to have the duplicator in front?

Going from my noob experiences, so far, does not one tend to follow what the action of the duplicator is (i.e. your eyes follow, "search" to track, the contact on the sample piece) and so if the sample has the lathe axis/chuck between you and the sample, and you look more closely/lean in...more dangerous? In front you could look and still be away from the spinning stuff.


With duplicator in the rear, it follow exactly, in is in and so on. If it were to the front would require a bit more design considerations, unless you wanted to re-size your part, then you could place it between cutter and pivot, but if you wanted 1:1, you'd need the tracer mounted an equal distance from and below the pivot.

Dr Stan
09-03-2011, 02:38 PM
In addition to other safety issues the grinder in the background is missing the end plates from the wheel guards.

Ironheart
09-03-2011, 02:39 PM
The part duplicator Norm "New Yankee Workshop" used was behind the lathe.


Ironheart...

kendall
09-03-2011, 02:40 PM
Actually was pretty decent vid even with all the unsafe details.

I cringed every time he got his hands near that chuck though.

If everything is made with the same size stock, think I would have gone with a taper threaded tube and a nut on the end, just slit the end of the tube and make your own collet.

Chris S.
09-03-2011, 02:50 PM
<snip>


....sorry all I see is many folk over reacting.

Nah, all I see is a bunch of guys having a good time. Fact is.. I'm an "Anti - Statist"! :p

The last thing that I'd advocate is government dictating how he should dress or operate his lathe.

Chris

Chris S.
09-03-2011, 03:00 PM
Actually was pretty decent vid even with all the unsafe details.

I cringed every time he got his hands near that chuck though.

If everything is made with the same size stock, think I would have gone with a taper threaded tube and a nut on the end, just slit the end of the tube and make your own collet.

You can bet that his dowel stock is not purchased in that form. Odds are he harvests his own wood and has another dedicated setup to make his own dowels. Perhaps that setup doesn't produce enough accuracy that a tube chuck would require? A tube chuck would be collet-esc and they don't have a lot of range. It's a good idea though!! ;)

Chris

darryl
09-03-2011, 05:58 PM
I applaud the ingenuity. I think something similar could be done for metalworking, maybe with heavier parts and some motion damping on the cutter mount assembly. Something could be made to mount to a crosslide, and the damping could be adjustable. You would set it to prevent the cutter digging in, but not slow the hand operation down too much.

I see the safety concerns, but I can't stress on that too much- I take risks myself all the time while operating my machinery. Of course, I minimize my risks using common sense, etc- I still have all my fingers, both my eyes, part of my brain, etc.

The chuck gave me a laugh- I'll bet they don't have an rpm limit based on destructive testing :) That might be fun to do though. I can just see one of those welds giving way and parts flying off at high speed- then there's the vibration issues with what's left of the chuck, already spinning at 6500 rpm- I think I'd trust a bolted-on threaded jaw before the welded-on nut. Not chinese bolts though-

Mcruff
09-03-2011, 06:13 PM
They are now.

Lab coats and ties were the norm years ago but things have changed in some parts of the world not so much in others. I bet there isn't an OSHA man telling him that he can't use a paper slip to pick up an edge because his fingers get to close to the rotating cutter.

Lab coats are still worn in a lot of shops, I have been wearing them for 30 years now. I wear one in my shop in the winter and I also wear one somedays at work. Long sleeve shirts are required in some shops, we wear them at work in the winter if it gets very cold due to the concrete walls and the close proximaty of the machines to them. OSHA could care less about either of those. Safety glasses are a different issue altogether. Most of you guys are over reacting. When I 1st started in the trade a lot of the older gentlemen still wore ties, white shirts and dark pants to work, most of them with 35+ years doing there jobs and yes they wore an apron or lab coat over the top of it all.

And no when using a duplicator you generally watch the part your making not the part your copying or the stylus folllowing it.

mike4
09-03-2011, 09:10 PM
I agree with Sir John , the long sleeves are clear of the chuck and he takes care not to get too close to the chuck.

I also have a long sleeved coat on in winter , all that has to be done is to make sure that you concentrate on what you are doing , operating a machine which you respect .
Safety is a big issue with all of us, but there is no need to get paranoid , I always check the speed settings before starting any piece of equipment , also make sure that any auto feed is off when starting a job for the first time , helps prevent a costly crash.

The man in the video seems to be capable of making a machine to carry out a task without costing the earth.

I think that the chuck is fairly well made , if you cant trust your welding for items under stress then dont make them .

As a repairer i have to be able to fabricate parts or supports for heavy equipment , these can often be supporting upwards of 40-50 tons of machine while I remove a part from underneath for either replacement or repair ,final drives or similar , so I have to trust my welding.

I work in areas which are becoming difficult to actually do any normal work while on the sites due to the what if mentality , too many people spend their time worrying about what might happen "if" , not actually designing a safe method of doing the work and getting the machine back into earning money for its owner.
i have been doing what I do for nearly 30 years now as a self employed person and still have all the fingers /toes which I was born with.
So I must be doing something right.

Michael

sasquatch
09-03-2011, 09:27 PM
An interesting video!!

Amazing what people can come up with when they have the desire to get at it!!

Yup, i too noticed the bench grinder in the left background with out guards.

If we could travel to all the under developed countries, we,d sure get our eyes opened to LOTS of this stuff in home shops.-----

Not to say lots of this stuff doesn't take place probably right in our own neighbourhoods!!:eek:

darryl
09-03-2011, 10:13 PM
'make sure the auto-feed is not engaged when starting'- our dovetail machine at work likes to sometimes begin the cycle when you power it up- it doesn't always wait for you to hit the cycle button. That has to be just about the opposite of a 'safety' feature.

Talk about what goes on in underdeveloped countries- we used to wash broken amplifier chassis in gasoline out behind the shop. We had the fresh gas tank and the used gas tank sitting there, pretty much against the wall of the building. All it would have taken is to short out a still-charged power supply cap with the metal band on the brush-