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wierdscience
09-03-2011, 02:20 PM
The idiots did it again:rolleyes:

http://www.cnn.com/2011/TECH/mobile/08/31/apple.phone.bar/index.html

precisionmetal
09-03-2011, 02:41 PM
...... or brilliant marketing strategy.

Grind Hard
09-03-2011, 03:53 PM
...... or brilliant marketing strategy.

You nailed it.

Weston Bye
09-03-2011, 04:33 PM
A disturbing report, related to the iDrunk.
http://www.cnn.com/2011/TECH/mobile/09/02/iphone.5.prototype/index.html?hpt=hp_t2
It appears that if a company is big enough, home invasion is possible with the aid of the authorities.


..man who told the publication that he consented to having his home searched for a phone by six officers last month. No one in the group identified himself as being an Apple employee, the man told SF Weekly. He reportedly said that he assumed they were all police officials and would not have permitted entry if he knew the searchers were from Apple.

wierdscience
09-03-2011, 04:49 PM
...... or brilliant marketing strategy.

It's brilliant done once,more than once it's stupid.

mike os
09-03-2011, 05:15 PM
or as it is more accurately described the ipieceofsh"t ;)

lazlo
09-03-2011, 05:49 PM
A disturbing report, related to the iDrunk.
http://www.cnn.com/2011/TECH/mobile/09/02/iphone.5.prototype/index.html?hpt=hp_t2
It appears that if a company is big enough, home invasion is possible with the aid of the authorities.

Yeah, that part is especially disappointing:

http://gizmodo.com/5837072/san-francisco-police-participated-in-search-for-lost-iphone-5

Apparently they used the internal GPS to remotely track the phone, and then "3 or 4" SFPD showed up on the guy's doorstep without a warrant. Several people searched the house, which were implied to be plain-clothes officers, but were apparently Apple employees. Nice. :mad:


"When they came to my house, they said they were SFPD," Calderón said. "I thought they were SFPD. That's why I let them in." He said he would not have permitted the search if he had been aware the two people conducting it were not actually police officers.

So in essence, the SFPD came over, flashed badges, seemingly made threats, and then stood by while private citizens searched the Calderón home.

macona
09-03-2011, 07:15 PM
So far we have only one side of the story.

They guy should have asked for all their badges. Also his fault for not refusing. The police do not have to tell you your rights, it's up to you to know them.

Weston Bye
09-03-2011, 07:17 PM
Don't blame the victim. It's still not right.

Iraiam
09-03-2011, 08:56 PM
Yeah, that part is especially disappointing:

http://gizmodo.com/5837072/san-francisco-police-participated-in-search-for-lost-iphone-5

Apparently they used the internal GPS to remotely track the phone, and then "3 or 4" SFPD showed up on the guy's doorstep without a warrant. Several people searched the house, which were implied to be plain-clothes officers, but were apparently Apple employees. Nice. :mad:


"When they came to my house, they said they were SFPD," Calderón said. "I thought they were SFPD. That's why I let them in." He said he would not have permitted the search if he had been aware the two people conducting it were not actually police officers.

So in essence, the SFPD came over, flashed badges, seemingly made threats, and then stood by while private citizens searched the Calderón home.

Yet another reason for me to continue NOT buying any apple products and to still consider apple a bad word, and some people think Microsoft is bad.
Find a cell phone that some pisshead lost in a bar = get your house searched by some jack booted thugs.

psomero
09-03-2011, 09:04 PM
Yeah, that part is especially disappointing:

http://gizmodo.com/5837072/san-francisco-police-participated-in-search-for-lost-iphone-5

Apparently they used the internal GPS to remotely track the phone, and then "3 or 4" SFPD showed up on the guy's doorstep without a warrant. Several people searched the house, which were implied to be plain-clothes officers, but were apparently Apple employees. Nice. :mad:


"When they came to my house, they said they were SFPD," Calderón said. "I thought they were SFPD. That's why I let them in." He said he would not have permitted the search if he had been aware the two people conducting it were not actually police officers.

So in essence, the SFPD came over, flashed badges, seemingly made threats, and then stood by while private citizens searched the Calderón home.


dumbass shouldn't have let them in the door without a warrant...

macona
09-03-2011, 10:54 PM
Don't blame the victim. It's still not right.


Sorry, I just can't feel bad for him. He could have told them to bugger off and they would have. He is an adult and made the conscious decision to let them in.

If the guy really does have it, or sold it, he could be in trouble. The local DA is going after the guy who sold it to gizmodo even after what he went through to try to get it back.

Weston Bye
09-03-2011, 11:22 PM
I'll back off a little.... I suspect that there were no innocents in the search situation. Certainly not the Apple men-in-black. Probably not the "citizen". But, the sad thing is that the cops seem to be wrong also, condoning heavy handed and misleading behavior by their presence and inaction.

The cops could conceiveably use the excuse that they were there to ensure the peace - to be available in case violence broke out. Seems that only certain parties were being "protected".

I know such things happen - my dad once delivered eviction papers to renters while a friend, an off-duty officer, waited, in uniform, in sight of the renters, in the car. Certainly wasn't legal, but it was effective.

macona
09-04-2011, 12:37 AM
The oddest thing is he has not filed a complaint with the PD. Straight to the media, and two months later.

precisionmetal
09-04-2011, 12:50 AM
I don't believe any of us have any real, true, first-hand information on what actually happened. Nowadays, I don't have much faith in what the press (or some web site) says.

One thing I do know is that Apple takes their own internal security very, very seriously. They put the fear of god into new-hires when it comes to talking, losing items, etc. It's spelled out very simply: "if you do xxx, you're gone".

I also know that they treat their employees very, very well, but expect hard work and loyalty in return. Nobody is forced to stay there -- people WANT to be working there, and Apple tries their best to create that desire.

Apple is the king of the mountain right now, and as is typical: you are an easy target and under scrutiny (and speculation) by everyone when in that position.

fwiw.... jmo

Scottike
09-04-2011, 01:46 AM
All the guy had to do is ask to see the search warrant, it's on him if he believed a bunch of gumbas that "said" they were cops, even if they were cops, they should have had a warrant.
If you don't stand up for your own rights, don't expect anybody else to - especially government employees.

Evan
09-04-2011, 02:08 AM
The "guy" is Mexican and the cops threatened him with an examination of his immigrant credentials. He may have none. The Apple employees are retired police officers from San Jose just across the bay from SF. No reports were filed, it was the Apple good old boys hooking up with their buddies in the Inglewood station to do a little private intimidation on the side. Both Apple and the four plain clothes cops are in deep manure and can be charged with a variety of offences including a couple of federal counts.

macona
09-04-2011, 03:35 AM
No, he is legal.

beanbag
09-04-2011, 05:15 AM
Let this be a lesson in the buying and selling of stolen property.

Black Forest
09-04-2011, 05:43 AM
I think there are three sides to this story.

Apples side.

Man whose house was searched side.

The truth is side three.

THe man whose house was searched seems like he wants to have his cake and eat it too.

He is whining that his house was searched under less than honest circumstances. But apparently the phone was in his house and certainly not honestly. So who is the bigger criminal?

I think there is much more to this story than we know.

lazlo
09-04-2011, 11:37 AM
But apparently the phone was in his house and certainly not honestly. So who is the bigger criminal?

He found the phone at a bar, he didn't steal it.

Yes, it didn't belong to him, but track it down by the GPS and invade his house? And this guy is "stupid" because half a dozen cops show up at his house and bully their way in?

Black Forest
09-04-2011, 05:14 PM
He found the phone at a bar? As in out in the parking lot on the ground? I would like to know the details of his "finding" the phone.

lazlo
09-04-2011, 05:52 PM
He found the phone at a bar? As in out in the parking lot on the ground?

Yep. It was left lying on a table, like the iDrunk incident with the iPhone 4 a year ago -- it was also left at a bar.

The Mac fan boys will protest, but if you leave an electronic device in a bar anywhere in North America, it will be taken.

Apple lawyers dredged up an obscure 1860's San Francisco statute that says that if you pick up an item, unattended, that doesn't belong to you, it's theft.

beanbag
09-04-2011, 05:52 PM
He should have turned it in to the police, like California law requires.

lazlo
09-04-2011, 06:09 PM
Apple argued for years that it was illegal to Jailbreak an iPhone too :)

http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/us-government-jailbreaking-iphone-legal/story?id=11254253

Iraiam
09-04-2011, 11:03 PM
And people wonder why I refer to Apple as i-thug. I like i-thuggery too.

precisionmetal
09-05-2011, 12:44 AM
I think there is much more to this story than we know.

Or.... much less than we should be caring about. ;)