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View Full Version : Australia - a whole factory of classic machine tools going to scrap



jhovel
09-15-2011, 11:00 AM
ANyone interested in vintage machine tools - and lives in Australia?
Have a look at my post here:
http://www.woodworkforums.com/f65/vintage-machine-tools-whole-factory-full-about-go-scrap-141117/
It's the end of an era....
Everything is for sale or will go to scrap :(

Cheers,
Joe

Dr Stan
09-15-2011, 01:18 PM
What a shame. :( I do hope they find good homes rather than the scrapper.

wierdscience
09-15-2011, 08:40 PM
That big surface grinder,the shear and that HBM are the real shame:(

gcude
09-15-2011, 09:14 PM
Hope the HBM finds a home. That would really be a shame to scrap it.
Anyone that doesn't have HBM envy, should browse through Adam's project pages at:

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/member-shop-photos/my-machine-shop-220616/

mike4
09-17-2011, 01:01 AM
ANyone interested in vintage machine tools - and lives in Australia?
Have a look at my post here:
http://www.woodworkforums.com/f65/vintage-machine-tools-whole-factory-full-about-go-scrap-141117/
It's the end of an era....
Everything is for sale or will go to scrap :(

Cheers,
Joe
Could you PM me the contact details for this sale?

There is some interesting machinery there , hate to see it come back as chinese paperweights.
Michael

dp
09-17-2011, 01:20 AM
So many museum pieces - so few museums. The bulk of it is too large for the HSM, and too creaking old for production shops. I was looking for the hidden gems that transcend time such as universal dividing heads but saw nothing to get a thrill up my leg about. It is stuff who's time has come, save for the collector, for the most part. More's the pity. Time has moved on, hence the rubble.

mike4
09-18-2011, 06:47 AM
So many museum pieces - so few museums. The bulk of it is too large for the HSM, and too creaking old for production shops. I was looking for the hidden gems that transcend time such as universal dividing heads but saw nothing to get a thrill up my leg about. It is stuff who's time has come, save for the collector, for the most part. More's the pity. Time has moved on, hence the rubble.

The HBM would possible outlast many of the newer offerings ,no electronics to let you down at a critical moment .
Manual machines may not be suited for high volume production of mostly disposable items ,but this one could still be used for repair work on a daily basis if required of it.

Would you like to be scrapped just because your not the fastest and latest model .

Some of us still take pride in restoring the workhorses and actually using them as many are versatile in what they can be used for .

Michael

jhovel
09-18-2011, 09:56 AM
Well, the executor may have seen the light. The scrap metal people are now not coming for another 5 weeks.
In the meantime, I wanted some Bendigo history in my workshop and bought a 3/4" floor standing pedestal drill press (a 60s ot 70s "Servian") very heave cast iron and solid 3" steel column. I also bought the Van Norman Re-Li-o No.2 "Piston Turning and Grinding Machine" - a 1920's cylindrical grinder with a cam following attachment for grinding to a master profile. The turning toolpost is missing (it was attached to the grinder spindle casting), It's also missing the spindle drive motor and the coolant pump, as well as the tailstock.
I'll restore that eventually (too many project right now).
I also got a milling vice and a few milling cutters.
The horizontal mill has been slaimed by a family member and one of the shapers has been sold, along with a power hacksaw. A forum member is interested in one of the forging hammers and another may have a buyer for one of the lathes.
I doubt that the shear or the Hoiz. Borer will be sold - it's just too big and heavy - the wight in scrap metal value far outweighs the value as a machine tool. Sadly that is also the case for a few of the others - I suspect including the Kearney & Trecker Milwaukee precision Mill, the brake press and the Norton surface grinder.... their scrap value is beyond the machine and refurbishing value.... sad but true. Transporting any of those machines would cost $1000s....
Anyway - anyone want to save any - contact me by PM.
Cheers,
Joe

Grind Hard
09-18-2011, 11:01 AM
See if it wasn't on the back end of the planet I would pay good money for the press-brake.

mike4
09-22-2011, 08:00 AM
So many museum pieces - so few museums. The bulk of it is too large for the HSM, and too creaking old for production shops. I was looking for the hidden gems that transcend time such as universal dividing heads but saw nothing to get a thrill up my leg about. It is stuff who's time has come, save for the collector, for the most part. More's the pity. Time has moved on, hence the rubble.
I dont wish to offend anyone ,but there have been numerous posts ,some quite lengthy on the salvaging and restoration of lathes and milling machines ,grinders,shapers , steam engines on this forum and others.
Just because they may be a bit big to shoehorn into the gap between the Bridgeport and the Southbend ,doesnt mean that time and some moneycould be spent on larger equipment if the person so desires.

I am waiting on quotes for transport and removal at the moment.

Michael