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dp
09-15-2011, 09:32 PM
I have a well-worn Norton wheel I bought from Boeing Surplus back when it was still around, and it has been an excellent wheel for putting an edge on my kitchen knives but for other uses as well. It leaves a beautiful finish. It has a part number of 37C320, meaning silicon carbide, 320 grit and has a 7/16" hole.

It wears quickly and is now smaller in diameter than the motor it is on so I can't grind long knives very well. I've dug around the Norton catalog and can't find this number which makes me wonder if it is a special order part or if it is out of production. If I can't find a replacement I may have to relocate it to another shaft and wear it until its gone.

Anyone know of a similar or exact wheel vendor?

tdmidget
09-15-2011, 11:13 PM
If you use a proper steel those knives will last longer and undoubtedly be sharper than you.

dp
09-15-2011, 11:46 PM
If you use a proper steel those knives will last longer and undoubtedly be sharper than you.

When you don't know the answer the proper response is either stoney silence or a simple "I don't know". Some of my knives are over 60 years old. The ones I like to sharpen with this wheel are about 15 years old and are commodity table steak knives that get their edges dragged across stoneware plates. I don't need different knives. I'd like to replace my Norton wheel.

tdmidget
09-16-2011, 12:13 AM
But you see I DO know the answer. I have a variety of kitchen knives, some modern stainless, some post WWII from Germany hand made with horn handles, and a couple of carbon steel knives, quite old, one hand made from a sawmill bandsaw blade. All respond miraculously to 4-6 strokes of a good steel. Just tonight a blade dulled from the exact use you describe went from nada to slip right through a tomato with 4 strokes of the steel. Very little metal removed and a wonderful edge. That is why quality knifemakers produce such steels. You can stroke against a steel or treat it like a lawnmower blade. Up to you. But your 15 year old knives will be ground away if used regularly before they are 60 years old.

RussZHC
09-16-2011, 01:25 AM
No joy...found a mention by Pixman of Bay State C being the equivalent of 37C (back in April, another site)

found a 37C120JVK listed on the Norton Polish site (did not bother to translate the size from mm to inches), that was the closest and finest grit I could find...

a 37C24 in a 14" wheel in the current industrial catalog, a 100 grit but in only a 3" or so wheel (page 220, current industrial catalog), there are a couple of 37C on ebay right now but in the 36 to 48 grit range...some talk of segments but that is no use to you...only other mentions I could find of 37C were as dressing sticks...my guess is Boeing had enough "clout" to special order

dp
09-16-2011, 01:36 AM
But you see I DO know the answer. I have a variety of kitchen knives, some modern stainless, some post WWII from Germany hand made with horn handles, and a couple of carbon steel knives, quite old, one hand made from a sawmill bandsaw blade. All respond miraculously to 4-6 strokes of a good steel. Just tonight a blade dulled from the exact use you describe went from nada to slip right through a tomato with 4 strokes of the steel. Very little metal removed and a wonderful edge. That is why quality knifemakers produce such steels. You can stroke against a steel or treat it like a lawnmower blade. Up to you. But your 15 year old knives will be ground away if used regularly before they are 60 years old.

I have nice knives I treat very well. These are not nice knives - they are adequate knives and once a month or so I like to refresh the edge on them. yes it wears them down, but I will be dead before they reach that point, and after that they go into the garbage. Some of them have serrated edges on them and respond quickly to the wheel. While I'm there I do them all. My nice knives will probably end up there too because nobody has much interest in old nice knives.

My very nice knives come out to carve the turkey or other special occasions and they are a joy to use. Those do not go near the wheel. Now back to the wheel...

Boostinjdm
09-16-2011, 02:15 AM
Can you dress the wheel at an angle so the knife blade clears the motor? That would at least give you some more time to locate a new wheel.

dp
09-16-2011, 02:16 AM
Didn't even think of that but it would work great.

dalee100
09-16-2011, 03:20 AM
Hi,

Norton has been pretty good at making custom wheels if you call them and ask. I used to have a 3/8x3 with a 3/8" hole white aluminum oxide wheel made by them. They were for a circular knife grinder. I had to order a 100 at a time. But Norton had no problem making a batch any time we called for them. So these could be a similar deal and not found in catalogs.

dalee

J Tiers
09-16-2011, 08:33 AM
Is the problem that you can't find a wheel with "that" part number?

Or that you can't find ANY wheel that appears to be capable of what you want?

I would guess that you can find another wheel, likely of a different number, that is equal in performance to what you have. There are oodles of wheel types.

You have the classic problem of "one of a kind" consumables..... replacing it. Essentially, unless you can find "that" number, you are going to use a "substitute". Not necessarily an "inferior substitute" or a "cheap substitute", but a substitute nonetheless. (is carbide or stellite an "inferior substitute" for HSS?)

I suppose you may as well get used to the idea that you will have to use something else, and then if you CAN find the "same" thing it will be a nice surprise.

tdmidget
09-16-2011, 08:53 AM
It is a very strange wheel. The 7/16 hole is certainly odd . 320 grit is more in the realm of polishing than grinding. It sounds like it was too small to be used on a cylindrical grinder for polishing chrome rods and such and those are probably from a vendor anyway.

dp
09-16-2011, 11:12 AM
Jerry - I am looking for that part number or equivalent. Not seen any very fine grit like this wheel yet though other things like dimension and material are common. It isn't life threatening if I can't find 320 grit but if I don't look for 320 I surely won't find it :). I've found lots of 120 and 240, and 240 would probably be ok and even last longer.

dp
09-16-2011, 11:14 AM
It is a very strange wheel. The 7/16 hole is certainly odd . 320 grit is more in the realm of polishing than grinding. It sounds like it was too small to be used on a cylindrical grinder for polishing chrome rods and such and those are probably from a vendor anyway.

Agreed - in fact after I got the wheel I had to go out and find a grinder to put it on cuz all mine had larger shafts.

easymike29
09-16-2011, 02:43 PM
http://lisleelectric.com/products/ddhdadadidjdhdjdgdidjdbd.html

Gene

dp
09-16-2011, 02:52 PM
http://lisleelectric.com/products/ddhdadadidjdhdjdgdidjdbd.html

Gene

Hot damn - that's it. At least close enough. The from the listing this seems to be the problem:
THIS IS A SPECIAL DUE TO THE FINE (320) GRIT

Mine is a -I8E but the -J8E will work as well. Thanks, Gene.