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Chris165
09-16-2011, 05:48 PM
I acquired a craftsman model 109 lathe. It has been completely striped down to the casting for cleaning and to replace the bent spindle. I want to do a full rebuild to it. If possible I'd like to see some pictures of other members model 109's and if anyone knows of a place to find replacement parts please let me know.

TOOLZNTHINGS
09-16-2011, 08:29 PM
Hello,

You can find just about anything for your lathe on E-bay. If I can figure out how to post a picture of mine I will. It's in the family room on display.:D My first lathe when I was growing up.

Brian

spongerich
09-16-2011, 08:52 PM
Homeshopsupply has a decent if expensive selection of parts for the 109

http://www.homeshopsupply.com/parts.html

Mike of the North
09-16-2011, 09:28 PM
There are a couple 109 groups on Yahoo groups.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/AA_109_Lathe_Users_Group/?yguid=248101580
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/atlas_craftsman/?yguid=248101580
The guy that runs one of the groups also owns the homeshopsupply web site.

J Tiers
09-16-2011, 09:53 PM
Ok Your intention is made clear..... and you can do what you want.

I will offer one thought...... Since FAR better machines are available, often for not much more than you may have paid for that, you should consider whether or not you really want to spend time and effort on it. You may want to send it on it's way elsewhere to some other person.

There are a number of very good and valid reasons why that machine is, if not totally "worthless", certainly a whole lot less useful than an Atlas 6", or any of a number of other low cost machines of similar size, including the various "minilathes" of the "7 x 12" size etc.

It's your choice. I owned a 109 at one point, so I'm not just a snob.

CCWKen
09-16-2011, 10:28 PM
Ebay is full of parts.
http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=craftsman+lathe+109&_dmd=1&_frs=1&_sop=12&_trksid=p3286.c0.m359

Yeah, the Dunlap lathes are pretty low on the pole. They were even cheaper than the Atlas series Sears marketed under the Craftsman badge.

J Tiers
09-16-2011, 11:08 PM
Yeah, the Dunlap lathes are pretty low on the pole. They were even cheaper than the Atlas series Sears marketed under the Craftsman badge.

My 109.20630 was badged "Craftsman"............

Chris165
09-17-2011, 07:01 PM
My model is the Atlas/Craftsman 109.21270. I looked at Home Shop Supply and contacted him about the apron (missing at that time). Now that I am ready to restore it I found out that he is unfortunately closing the shop.
As far as it being a not so capable machine, I have 2 Sherlines to do small work and a big South Bend for the large projects. The lathe was given to me as a gift to restore along with a little Adept lathe which I know nothing about.

J Tiers
09-17-2011, 09:09 PM
My model is the Atlas/Craftsman 109.21270.

Ixnay on the Atlas part...... Craftsman it might be.

Atlas was vendor 101, AA was vendor 109, hence the "109" in the model number.

The little "Adept" is about the same quality of machine....

One issue with the 109 is the crossfeed, no dial, and a feed of 41.66666 thou per turn, so a dial is pretty unlikely to be very useful. Screw is 24 tpi.... When they could have used 20 tpi, and permitted dials, one wonders why they did not.

The Artful Bodger
09-17-2011, 11:22 PM
The little "Adept" is about the same quality of machine....



The Adept lathe was in a class all of its own... quite unlike any other, except for a handful of makes that were damn near clones of the Adept.;)

The Artful Bodger
09-17-2011, 11:24 PM
Chris, your little Adept lathe. Whatever you do do not try to take slack out of the spindle bearings by tightening those inviting looking screws. If you do there will be a sickening 'click' and the head stock casting will crack.

(No, I did not break mine, but I was well warned in time.;) )

Chris165
09-18-2011, 08:06 AM
Chris, your little Adept lathe. Whatever you do do not try to take slack out of the spindle bearings by tightening those inviting looking screws. If you do there will be a sickening 'click' and the head stock casting will crack.

(No, I did not break mine, but I was well warned in time.;) )

Thanks for the warning. Lucky for me the person the previous owner received the lathe from had it stripped down and powdercoated so I don't have to do anything to it but dust it off. I most likely will not use it because it is too nice of a machine. I want to put a sewing machine motor behind it and mount them both on a nice wood board to put on display.

Tony Ennis
09-18-2011, 09:28 AM
I agree with JTiers completely.

The ubiquitous 9x20 would be far more lathe and would be superior by any measure out of the box.

I resurrected (not restored) a wreck and I can tell you it's a lot of work and expense.

J Tiers
09-18-2011, 09:57 AM
The Adept lathe was in a class all of its own... quite unlike any other, except for a handful of makes that were damn near clones of the Adept.;)

Oh, I didn't say it was the SAME.....

But...

Both are "bare bones" cheap machines.

Both have plain spindle bearings of which some at least are non-adjustable. (Rear spindle bearing on 109 is a fixed sleeve)

Both apparently lack calibrations on ANY feeds.

Both seem to have non-standard feed screws (12 TPI??) with fractional amounts left over per turn. The 109 does, anyway (24tpi crossfeed).

Both have limited speed range with step pulley. Some 109 have a back gear for double the number of speeds, but not all do.

Some 109 machines have a driven leadscrew and will screwcut, which the Adept won't, but apparently an adapter or modification to the Adept could provide that.

All that said, I would class the "Adept" as a "more honest" machine.... it seems to promise nothing past what it can do. The 109 has an irritating pretense to being more lathe than it is.

All in all it really doesn't matter.

The Artful Bodger
09-18-2011, 03:58 PM
The standard Adept did not even have a lead screw but the biggest difference would be that it takes two hands to comfortably carry your 109 to the kitchen table.:)

Rex
09-19-2011, 03:29 PM
Chris, I too like those little 109s. I had 3 until last week, when I sold one. All of mine are pre-war, and are restored and sitting on shelves in the library area.
I think they make great little pre-war lathe models. Hee's the two I have now:

109-0701
http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c196/rburkheimer/2181e4f5.jpg

Sherman Tools - belt-drive feedscrew
http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c196/rburkheimer/AArestored.jpg
This one is pictured on Lathes.co.uk

Chris165
09-19-2011, 07:08 PM
Very nice machines. Looks like you spent quite a bit of time getting them to look that good.

Rex
09-20-2011, 02:00 PM
Thanks!
Winter projects when I was bored.
Those little things don't accumulate all the crap like a real lathe does, and the paint washes off with water.

UptownSport
08-26-2012, 06:16 PM
Some 109 have a back gear for double the number of speeds, but not all do.

Thought that thing was a clutch until the little lock-in screw broke ...

So you can see awareness level of most 109 owners- Don't know any better-
Used fathers old lathe and thought it was the bees-knees until I used the Clausing
Used fathers US Machine mill and thought that was great too, until series I CNC ...

Now some wiseacre will come by and say clausing and Bridgeport are worthless as there's some new super-disco equipment-

In short, it's all relative- 109 is infinitely better than nothing; it's helped me considerably.

Question- Anyone used the 109 milling attachment?

jep24601
08-27-2012, 09:11 AM
I agree with JTiers completely.

What has not been mentioned in this thread is that JTiers has written a substantial article on upgrading the 109 - it's just that it's not worth it considering the other offerings available. If this is just a mantelpiece restoration then Ok - do a nice paint job and polish. Should you wish to actually use this machine for some strange reason then JTiers upgrades are not only worthwhile but somewhat necessary.