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lynnl
09-21-2011, 01:58 PM
The "English Language" thread brings to mind a topic I've always found interesting: names of places and subdivisions, and such.

Very near me is a subdivision that has all the street names reflecting computers and/or software. Naturally, the main entrance is "Disc Drive." Been a few years since I drove through, so I don't recall many others, but they're all something like Ram Way, Floppy Drive, Memory Lane, etc.

One developer in this area named the streets in one of his developments for his family members. A daughter gave rise to "Lisa" street. Of particular interest was "Bubba" street. Not sure I'd want that for my address. :D

Southerners historically have seemed to go more for real down home, rustic names than most of the country. One of my favorites is the town of "Lick Skillet", Tennessee. Actually I think there are other Lick Skillets around the south.

Anybody got any unusual names in your area(s)? I would think the Brits would have some entertaining offerings. Probably Aussies too.

One local county road I like is "Butter and Egg Road." Not hard to imagine where that one came from.

3jaw
09-21-2011, 02:03 PM
A few from western Kentucky:

Possum Trot

Monkey's Eyebrow

Coldwater

rmwise
09-21-2011, 02:12 PM
Turkey Foot Rd in Bourbon, MO and Hog Trough (a bridge) in Steelville, MO are 2 of my favorites.

For "towns" you have Frankenstein, MO and Bem, MO

Frank Ford
09-21-2011, 02:13 PM
In my local area:

Lois Lane
Easy Street

H380
09-21-2011, 02:27 PM
I69 approaching Climax, Michigan. An old boss had that on his voice mail greeting.

aboard_epsilon
09-21-2011, 02:49 PM
Penisardre Road, Prestatyn.


to an english man would sound funny

pen iss ar dray to a welsh man

all the best.markj

Black_Moons
09-21-2011, 03:13 PM
Intersection of 'Young' and 'Gay'

'Crush crescent' that crosses train tracks.. And has had a train derail nearby.

macona
09-21-2011, 03:48 PM
There is a:

Boring, Or,
Zigzag, Or
Rhododendron, OR
Fossil, OR

ckalley
09-21-2011, 03:50 PM
Seen on an overpass on the highway between Savanah & Macon GA:
Skate r Bowl Road!

Craig

Rustybolt
09-21-2011, 04:00 PM
GOOBIES!
A town in Newfoundland.
Ishkabibble Rd.
A rd in Ontario

Black Forest
09-21-2011, 04:12 PM
Intercourse, Pennsylvania.

Blue Balls, Pennsylvania.

paulsv
09-21-2011, 04:15 PM
My brother's boss once asked him to come up with some "french-sounding" street names for a subdivision the guy was doing. My brother suggested "Rue de Valley," Rue de Day," and Rue de Toot-Toot."

How about:

Intercourse, Pa
Bird in Hand, Pa
Hell, TX
Truth or Consequences, NM
Sandwich, IL

paulsv
09-21-2011, 04:17 PM
Also, Highway 196 in Michigan is known as the Gerald R. Ford Freeeway, and it has a "Covert" exit.

lynnl
09-21-2011, 04:18 PM
Rue de Toot Toot! :D I like that. :D

John Stevenson
09-21-2011, 04:24 PM
There are loads of villages in the UK called Adverse Camber, never visited any of them but you see the signs for them all over..............

lynnl
09-21-2011, 04:30 PM
Yeah, every state here seems to have a Falling Rock. Evidently they're all just real small towns, and located off the main highway, 'cause I've never seen or driven through one.

TGTool
09-21-2011, 04:32 PM
Oklahoma has a town called Bugtussle and I recall some place in Iowa or Minnesota as a Superman drive that runs into Lois Lane. I'm told in Milwaukee the standing joke is, What do they do with old streetcars in Milwaukee? Take them out to Fifth and Burnham.

Video Man
09-21-2011, 05:00 PM
My favorite is from York, England, where I encountered a
real estate flyer for a vastly pricey home on Bad Bargain Lane....

rohart
09-21-2011, 05:05 PM
I use to think the French were very rude calling so many places around the Alps 'chute de pierres', whoever he was.

We've got a Seething Wells Lane near an Electric Parade, but apart from living in Strawberry Hill, my area of london is quite mundane.

Oh, yes, there is Feltham Young Offenders Institution up the road !

C - ROSS
09-21-2011, 05:07 PM
How about "Worms" Nebraska

Ross

J Register
09-21-2011, 05:25 PM
Justamere Farm Road has a nice ring to it. That's in Kernersville, NC. I've been to Bat Cave and to Nags Head, but never to Lizard Lick or Flat Rock.

garagemark
09-21-2011, 05:25 PM
Short Pump Virginia

Bob Fisher
09-21-2011, 05:30 PM
Corner of Ho and Hum, Carefree, Az. Bob.

justanengineer
09-21-2011, 06:22 PM
I used to live near Boonville NY, and yes, it was in the sticks. :cool:

JoeCB
09-21-2011, 06:30 PM
In Michigan we too have a "Hell" but we also have "Paradise".
Also, "Bad Ax"

Joe B

aostling
09-21-2011, 06:39 PM
My cousin lives at the end of Pull And Be Damned Road, in La Conner: http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&tab=wl

Bainbridge Island has a Toe Jam Hill Road http://maps.google.com/maps?q=Toe+Jam+Hill+Road+Northeast,+Bainbridge+Isl and,+WA&hl=en&sll=48.38402,-122.531913&sspn=0.020778,0.024891&vpsrc=0&t=m&z=15. It is actually named after a Swede.

The town of Humptulips is now just a place name in the middle of nowhere http://maps.google.com/maps?q=Humptulips,+WA&hl=en&sll=47.583384,-122.506386&sspn=0.021102,0.024891&vpsrc=0&t=m&z=11.

A.K. Boomer
09-21-2011, 06:50 PM
Last chance colo.

and it really is your last chance - it's out in the middle of nowhere...

sasquatch
09-21-2011, 06:53 PM
One of the funniest is in newfoundland called "Dildo".

Southern Ontario had "Punkydoodles Corners".

halac
09-21-2011, 07:04 PM
Here in Middle Tennessee:

Bugscuffle

Salt Lick

Defeated

Difficult

Chaw Rd.

And my wife's folks hale from Brimstone Hollow. :eek:

wierdscience
09-21-2011, 07:12 PM
Bald Knob,AR is one and near here was a now defunct real estate development named "Morning Wood Estates":D

lane
09-21-2011, 07:17 PM
The town of Frog Suck Arkansas.Also Snow Arkansas. And a place called Possion Trot La.

John Stevenson
09-21-2011, 07:19 PM
The company we use for re-rubbering the bandsaw wheels is on Dogpool Lane in Birmingham.

That makes you wonder what the area was like 200 years ago ?

panchula
09-21-2011, 08:48 PM
Exit 69 on Interstate 75 in Michigan is Big Beaver Rd.

Michigan's Upper Peninsula has both Rudyard and Kipling. Along with Pine Stump Junction and Felch.

Written in Ann Arbor, where Hell is a local call...

doctor demo
09-21-2011, 08:50 PM
Hooker Creek Road, Balls Ferry Road and Gas Point Road near Anderson Ca.
Makes ya wonder what they were thinking.

Steve

Bob Farr
09-21-2011, 09:01 PM
Exit 69 on Interstate 75 in Michigan is Big Beaver Rd.

Michigan's Upper Peninsula has both Rudyard and Kipling. Along with Pine Stump Junction and Felch.

Written in Ann Arbor, where Hell is a local call...

Big Beaver Road link. I think I need a new t-shirt: http://getoffonbigbeaver.com/index.asp

I've been to Hell, MI (and back, a few times!), too:

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/Hell2-2.jpg

Arcane
09-21-2011, 09:12 PM
Big Beaver is the name of my home town...so when someone asks where I am from I can honestly say (and with a straight face) "I'm from BIG BEAVER!" :D (It's right by The Big Muddy...)

Mcostello
09-21-2011, 09:17 PM
Coonpath rd in Ohio. All 5 pieces of it.

J Tiers
09-21-2011, 09:20 PM
What? Nobody mentioned "Truth or Consequences" NM?

An Aunt of my wife used to live at the corner of Hollywood and Vine, somewhere outside of Chicago.


other oddities......

Pronunciation of roads and place names is also a goodie......

In St Louis, "Chouteau" street is pronounced "Show-tow". But the town of "Des Peres" is pronounced "Day-pear".

The "Courtois" river in outstate Missouri is pronounced "coat-away"

bruto
09-21-2011, 09:40 PM
In Salisbury, Connecticut, there is or at least used to be, a "Skunks Misery Road."

In my present home town, there's a "Money Hole Road."

If I drive from here to the American Precision Museum in Windsor, I pass through Felchville.

If you land at the Punxsatawny PA airport and drive north, you'll find yourself midway between Desire and Panic.

Your Old Dog
09-21-2011, 10:01 PM
I've always like Athol Springs, NY.

Pete F
09-21-2011, 10:14 PM
In Concord, MA, there is "Old Road to Nine Acre Corner" - we called it ORNAC.

In Davis, CA - Mello Place. The sign was usually missing.

And, of course, Athol, MA, home of Starrett.

-Pete

kls1533
09-21-2011, 10:23 PM
Very much enjoyed this thread...

Seeing the other Pennsylvania references I thought for sure Virginville, PA and Climax, PA would have made the list. Ironically very much near some of the other towns listed already...

Have a great night...

john hobdeclipe
09-21-2011, 10:28 PM
Leave Charlotte, NC, Eastbound on NC 24/27. When you get to Red Cross, turn right on 205 and drive a couple miles to Big Lick. At Big Lick, turn left and drive a couple miles back to 24/27, then turn right. Another 1/2 mile and you're in Frog Pond. Turn right onto Frog Pond Road, then right onto Hazard Rd.

Turn left on Saint Martin Road, go about 2 miles again, then at the church turn right onto Booger Holler Road. Park at the bottom of the hill and wait patiently for the ghost.

So much for North Carolina.

In Parkersburg, West Virgina is "Lost Pavement Road." I've often wondered about that name.

Somewhere in my archives I have a list of interesting place names in Pennsylvania, and another from Alabama. If I can find those I'll pass them along.

quadrod
09-21-2011, 11:16 PM
Arkansas has booger hollow and toad suck.

paulsv
09-21-2011, 11:27 PM
State parks are good too. On one road trip I stopped at Big Bone Lick State Park (http://parks.ky.gov/findparks/recparks/bb/) which,believe it or not, is right outside of Beaver Lick Kentucky.

FatWheels
09-21-2011, 11:28 PM
It was mentioned elsewhere but I live about five minutes from Lizard Lick, North Carolina. I also live on Luxury Lane. I don't have enough money to put up any hotels yet, I'm still saving but I do live in Park Place subdivision.

regards,

Jim

paulsv
09-21-2011, 11:31 PM
The town of Downers Grove, Illinois has always made me think of a bunch of drugged out hippies hanging out in the woods.

RussZHC
09-21-2011, 11:39 PM
Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump

[apparently there are quite a few "Buffalo Jump" but only one with their heads smashed in ;) ]

joeby
09-22-2011, 12:50 AM
Swampoodle Road, PA

This being the main attraction,
http://www.arichnersautoparts.com/ which is not far at all from Gum Stump.

Also not far away is Pacific and a few miles from there, Atlantic.

Kevin

DickDastardly40
09-22-2011, 03:52 AM
For unusual place names in the UK check out this:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Meaning-Liff-Douglas-Adams/dp/0330281216/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1316677955&sr=8-1

It gives all the names a meaning in the manner of a dictionary and makes a very good smallest room time passer.

EVguru
09-22-2011, 04:38 AM
I pass Cold Christmas occasionally and there are all the Slaughters.

A couple of good ones are the Welsh village of Pant-Y-Gyrdll and the Australian town of Djabringabeeralong.

batt-man
09-22-2011, 05:13 AM
Whenever i visit my brother in Wiltshire, UK i drive through "chilton foliat", go pass "crooked soley", avoid the road marked to "axford", pass "witcha" and "whittonditch works", ignore the signs to "marridge hill" and "baydon manor" before arriving in the village of "aldbourne"

Just where the hell do some of these names come from? :eek:

Cheers
Batt...

PS - that's all in about a 5 or 6 mile stretch of road !!!

The Artful Bodger
09-22-2011, 06:34 AM
I cant think of anything too amusing around here although there is a road a bit south of here known as the Pig Root, maybe it was originally Pig Route.

GKman
09-22-2011, 06:39 AM
I was pleased when the powers that be, officially naming all roads for 911 access didn't bow to political correctness or snobbery - Possum Holler Road, Agency Missouri.

.RC.
09-22-2011, 07:40 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v606/OzRinger/bangher-leever_528_poster.jpg

Deus Machina
09-22-2011, 07:58 AM
There's a place around me where a house got half-destroyed by a tree that fell during a hurricane. They lived in a trailer for more than a year while it got fixed. They have since renamed their private road 'Falling Oaks Dr.'

I have seen the point where Street Avenue intersects with Avenue Street.

I thought I grew up in a small town, but I once sent a few parts I sold on eBay to some little town or another (in Arkansas, I think) with the address on 'The Road.'

gvasale
09-22-2011, 09:05 AM
Don't know how these will measure up, but there is Over the Top Rd. in Holland Ma, and a longstanding joke Podunk Pike in East Brookfield.

Boot
09-22-2011, 09:24 AM
How about the town of "Intercourse"
and we have "Blue Balls" and "Bird in Hand"on the road to "Paradise".

Lew Hartswick
09-22-2011, 10:49 AM
Another PA location, "Potliker Flats", along 322 between Lewistown
and State College.
...lew...

lynnl
09-22-2011, 10:53 AM
One of the key battles, late in our Revolutionary war, was at a place called Cowpens, in SC. From what I've been able to learn, it was just an area where the locals would gather together their livestock ...for sale, or further shipment, or some such - maybe just grazing. Always wanted to go there. Ol' Daniel Morgan gave Bloody Banistare Tarleton a whupping there with a very brilliant use of his inferior forces and the natural topography.

South of here, in Alabama, there's an area known as "Horsepens 40," which as far as I know is simply an area, not a community. Never really been there myself. I think it also relates to the revolutionary war era, ...or maybe it's the civil war.

In my readings of the Civil War, particularly the campaigns in Virginia and the Shenandoah area, I've seen a lot of unusual (to me) names. Seems like the word "courthouse" was included often, which apparently had a different connotation back in those days, than now.

J Harp
09-22-2011, 11:32 AM
Eastern Kentucky has a passel of them. Here are a few.
Ogle, Black Snake, Shoulderblade, Turkey, Rowdy, Vest, Viper, Fisty, Cutshin, Thousandsticks, Softshell, Mousy, Decoy, Hi Hat, and Topmost. there are many more unique place names all over the Appalachian area.

38_Cal
09-22-2011, 11:38 AM
According to my son, there's an intersection in Santa Margarita, CA of Antonio and Banderas.

David

Bob Fisher
09-22-2011, 11:46 AM
Michigan's upperm peninsula has an old mining town called "GAY". Home of the Gay Bar and not much else.

Guido
09-22-2011, 11:56 AM
Salvage and scrap iron area, three main dirt roads which need addresses only for the UPS delivery/pickup: Gasoline Alley, turns north to Alley Oop which again turns to become Oop's Loop.

(Next----)

brozier
09-22-2011, 12:41 PM
In France all roads seem to lead to Centre-Ville wherever that is...:D

Near my home in the UK we have Newton Burgoland (MacDonalds theme park?), Sheepy Magna which is near Sheepy Parva and of course plain old Sheepy (not a lot to do after dark round here)

My favourite is Barton-in-the-Beans, and there is Norton-Juxta-Twycross and of course Coalville which is where coal was invented!

A little bit further afield we have No-Mans-Heath, it's ladies only there...

I used to work in Loughborough for an American company and I haven't met an American who can pronouniate the name correctly - probably why they closed the site :eek:

Cheers
Bryan

paddleman
09-22-2011, 01:20 PM
I can boast that I live not far from the beach near LA. And if I wanted to boil eggs in Coldwater I'd have to travel about a half hour. I've been in Utopia too, a nowhere place really. All in Ontario. Let you off the hook as LA locally, actually translates as LaFontaine and yeah I know about Coldwater stateside.

Timleech
09-22-2011, 02:46 PM
http://jezzbean.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/040507_cbrown_mp_comm_nod.jpg

Tim

Toolguy
09-22-2011, 02:50 PM
And don't forget about Stratford on Avon. Apparently an Avon Lady called upon the Stratford residence and they were mutually attracted to one another.

mklotz
09-22-2011, 02:59 PM
I used to work in Loughborough for an American company and I haven't met an American who can pronouniate the name correctly - probably why they closed the site :eek:


And I haven't met a Brit yet who can spell "pronounce" correctly.

Weston Bye
09-22-2011, 03:29 PM
I live in Grand Blanc - pronounced GrandBlank by us locals. Named for the first non-indigenous settler - a big white guy who opened a trading post.

Scottike
09-22-2011, 05:04 PM
We have several around this neck of the woods, Happy Valley rd.,
Schmuck rd, and Sunnyside ave.
South of here is the Duckabush (a river), and the towns of Potlatch and Lilliwaup.
Close by is the community of Blynn and the Jimmie Come Lately creek runs through it.

Harvey Melvin Richards
09-22-2011, 05:56 PM
Fillmore, Virgin, Beaver, all Utah.

http://www.cafepress.com/+fillmore_virgin_beaver_in_utah_white_tshirt,17550 1955

Toolguy
09-22-2011, 06:13 PM
With all the polygamy going on, there isn't any of that left in Utah.:mad:

macona
09-22-2011, 08:36 PM
Renishaw, who makes touch probes and encoders, address is:

Renishaw plc
New Mills
Wotton-under-Edge
Gloucestershire


What the heck is a Wotton-under-Edge?

thebigron
09-22-2011, 10:18 PM
"Six Mile" a town in upper South Carolina and "Poorhouse Road" north of Taylorsville, NC. out in the country

Bond
09-22-2011, 11:49 PM
In OKC two streets, none such road and first gravel road

Bill736
09-23-2011, 12:02 AM
I say it's no coincidence that Intercourse, PA is so close to Paradise, PA.
For those of you with no partner, however, Bird in Hand, PA is just down the road.

J Tiers
09-23-2011, 12:08 AM
For unusual place names in the UK


Isn't there a place in the UK known as "Middle Wallop"? IIRC in between over Wallop and Nether Wallop?

Back over here, I pass a turnoff for "Raccoon" in Indiana South of Crawfordsville.

And somewhere along I70 in Indiana or thereabouts is a place apparently called "Little Point". I have never stopped there, for obvious reasons.

winchman
09-23-2011, 02:16 AM
I lived on Mistletoe Lane near Summerville, SC, for fifteen years.

Ed P
09-23-2011, 08:20 AM
This maybe a little off the original topic but in Durham, NC there are streets with the same name as my first, middle and last name. In fact the street with the same name as my first runs right into the street with my last name. So there is a sign post with my first and last names on it, and in the correct order. Not the best part of town, but hey who's counting. A couple of blocks over there is a street with the same name as my father's middle name.

Ed P

Toolguy
09-23-2011, 10:08 AM
I say it's no coincidence that Intercourse, PA is so close to Paradise, PA.
For those of you with no partner, however, Bird in Hand, PA is just down the road.

That makes one wonder about the veracity of the saying "A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush". "The Bird of Paradise" I can understand.;)

John Stevenson
09-23-2011, 10:37 AM
That makes one wonder about the veracity of the saying "A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush". "The Bird of Paradise" I can understand.;)


Actually the saying is
"A one in the hand is worth two in Kate Bush "

john hobdeclipe
09-23-2011, 05:45 PM
On Ohio Route 7, just across the river from Moundsville, WV, is the town of Dilles Bottom.

BMW Rider
09-23-2011, 08:47 PM
Southern Ontario had "Punkydoodles Corners".

I know that spot, I've been there as some of my wifes extended family lives near it.

There's a street in Calgary named Bison Path.

ligito
09-23-2011, 08:54 PM
Wankers Corners, Oregon

Malc-Y
09-24-2011, 12:09 PM
In the city of Kingston-upon-Hull (usually called "Hull") in Yorkshire, England, there is a narrow street in the older part of town called "Land of Green Ginger"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Land_of_Green_Ginger

Malc. :cool:

Stuart Br
09-24-2011, 01:06 PM
Wotton is a very common English place name. I grew up in one, not the "Under-Edge" one though. It is believed to be derived from the Saxon
"Wudetun" meaning the enclosure, homestead or village (tun) in or near the wood (wude).

As for Under-Edge, you only have to go there, it is a town located beneath the very steep edge of the Cotswold hills as they drop off into the Severn Valley.

danlb
09-24-2011, 01:09 PM
I once lived on Glendale street. It is either redundant or an oxymoron or both all by itself:

glen: Noun: A narrow valley.
dale: Noun: A valley, esp. a broad one.

So the street was named after a broad narrow valley. Or a valley valley. Or....

Either way it's weird

Dan

Stuart Br
09-24-2011, 01:11 PM
A large number of medieval English Cities had streets named Gropec*nt Lane, where not surprisingly the ladies of the night plied their trade. None remain today after gradual cleaning up of street names over the centuries.

ammcoman2
09-24-2011, 06:28 PM
In between Pickering and Toronto, Finch Ave is connected to Old Finch Ave by "Plug Hat Rd." It then becomes Finch Ave again!

Geoff

PixMan
09-24-2011, 06:58 PM
The Commonwealth of Massachusetts has a town bearing the official name of "Manchester-By-The-Sea".

Near me is a section of East Brookfield that has long been referred to as "Podunk", and that was long before the town was incorporated as the newest town in The Commonwealth (c.a. 1920) and before an old newspaper comic strip made the moniker represent an ignorant backwoods community.

Over in Brookfield, part of the pre-Revolutionary Quaboag Plantation is one of the oldest named and populated (by white settlers) streets, still known as "Devil's Elbow Road".

kwoodhands
09-24-2011, 07:08 PM
The "English Language" thread brings to mind a topic I've always found interesting: names of places and subdivisions, and such.

Very near me is a subdivision that has all the street names reflecting computers and/or software. Naturally, the main entrance is "Disc Drive." Been a few years since I drove through, so I don't recall many others, but they're all something like Ram Way, Floppy Drive, Memory Lane, etc.

One developer in this area named the streets in one of his developments for his family members. A daughter gave rise to "Lisa" street. Of particular interest was "Bubba" street. Not sure I'd want that for my address. :D

Southerners historically have seemed to go more for real down home, rustic names than most of the country. One of my favorites is the town of "Lick Skillet", Tennessee. Actually I think there are other Lick Skillets around the south.

Anybody got any unusual names in your area(s)? I would think the Brits would have some entertaining offerings. Probably Aussies too.

One local county road I like is "Butter and Egg Road." Not hard to imagine where that one came from.


Honest John Road in Estell Manor and No Name road both on rt 50 , in Southern NJ.

mike

John Stevenson
09-24-2011, 07:39 PM
A large number of medieval English Cities had streets named Gropec*nt Lane, where not surprisingly the ladies of the night plied their trade. None remain today after gradual cleaning up of street names over the centuries.

It's now been renamed.

http://citynoise.org/upload/29573.jpg

motorworks
09-24-2011, 07:57 PM
Well NL has some of the best...
There is : Dildo and South Dildo which has Dildo Island
(you can take a boat tour of Dildo Island during the summer months.
And there is a big party called Dildo Days each summer..)
And that's not far from 'Come By Chance'
a little ways from 'Hearts Content' just over
from 'Blow me Down'. And we won't speak of 'Gay Side'

e2die
a proud NL'er

J Tiers
09-24-2011, 08:34 PM
I once lived on Glendale street. It is either redundant or an oxymoron or both all by itself:

glen: Noun: A narrow valley.
dale: Noun: A valley, esp. a broad one.

So the street was named after a broad narrow valley. Or a valley valley. Or....



It isn't unusual in new developments, typically of "woodwaster" houses, to find names like "Greenvalley Ridge", or the like.

Similarly odd and internally inconsistent. All I can figure is that they mean the ridge BY the green valley, or, more likely, that they weren't considering the meaning of the name, just the way it "rolls off the tongue". Marketing, you know, gotta have a rustic-sounding name even if the place is paved-over and the book of "covenants" is as thick as a 'phone book.

Places with names including "Ridge" will be in a valley, 9 times out of 10.... and if the name has "Valley" in it, you will find it on a hill.

SGW
09-25-2011, 07:24 AM
There is a road in Kennebunk, ME, called Cat Mousam Road. It crosses the Maine Turnpike.

There is a road in Berlin, MA, called Hog Swamp Road. Berlin has over the years become somewhat of a desirable rural community to live in, and at one point several of the new residents petitioned the town to rename the road; they didn't like having the address "Hog Swamp." I'm not sure if they were successful or not.

bruto
09-25-2011, 08:20 AM
There is a road in Kennebunk, ME, called Cat Mousam Road. It crosses the Maine Turnpike.

There is a road in Berlin, MA, called Hog Swamp Road. Berlin has over the years become somewhat of a desirable rural community to live in, and at one point several of the new residents petitioned the town to rename the road; they didn't like having the address "Hog Swamp." I'm not sure if they were successful or not.In Sharon, CT, Mudge Pond was renamed Silver Lake by developers, but it didn't really stick. Locals still preferred the original, leaving the lake with two names.

In the odd city names category, has anyone remembered to include Medicine Hat, Alberta?

lynnl
09-25-2011, 12:40 PM
When and why did Jackson Hole, WY become just plain Jackson?

I always liked the name Jackson Hole. I never saw any negative connotation to that name. ..."Hole" just kinda added a uniqueness to the place, in my opinion. Was out there summer before last, and saw almost no references at all to the old name.

platypus2020
09-25-2011, 02:04 PM
I used to live near Boonville NY, and yes, it was in the sticks. :cool:

I was through there on Friday and yes it is remote. And getting more remote as time goes on, its now basically a wide spot in the road with a Sunoco station and a Burger King.



jack

Lew Hartswick
09-26-2011, 10:09 AM
When and why did Jackson Hole, WY become just plain Jackson?

I always liked the name Jackson Hole. I never saw any negative connotation to that name. ..."Hole" just kinda added a uniqueness to the place, in my opinion. Was out there summer before last, and saw almost no references at all to the old name.
The town has ALWAYS been Jackson. It was the valley that was called
"Jackson Hole" It's only the stupid tourists that have been calling the
the town that.
...Lew...

lynnl
09-26-2011, 11:38 AM
The town has ALWAYS been Jackson. It was the valley that was called
"Jackson Hole" It's only the stupid tourists that have been calling the
the town that.
...Lew...

Well Drat! I wish you hadn't told me that.

Nevertheless, in the AF I worked with a guy who was from there, and he called it Jackson Hole. That was where I first learned of the place.

lynnl
09-26-2011, 04:40 PM
Just noticed another odd name candidate today, along a road I drive regularly, but had never caught my eye before.
"Bumper Crop Lane"

A lot of the subdivisions around here were cotton fields just a few years ago, as was the case in this instance.

TGTool
09-27-2011, 06:48 PM
In eastern Oklahoma I-40 crosses a man-made lake and one of the roads intersecting is named Lottawata Road. I wouldn't have had the guts to propose that. Maybe proposed as a joke and it was accepted as a joke on the originator.

bobw53
09-27-2011, 09:04 PM
I've always like Athol Springs, NY.

When I was in High School we used to play Athol, MA (where Starret is from). That was always a good long bus ride. We're going to kick the Ath Holes.... a$$ ????
(we always lost, we sucked).

And north of Truth or Consequences is Elephant Butte, its Butte with a long U like Butte Montana, but we're always going to Elephant Butt.

Then we've got Weed, which is odd considering that we are so close to the border.

One I think is just cool, is Cloud Croft (its in the clouds, literally). Come out of Alamogordo on an early January day, it was 70+ degrees, go 16 miles, and almost 7,000 more feet of elevation, and they just had 17 inches of snow, and it was still snowing.

kf2qd
09-27-2011, 10:19 PM
In eastern Oklahoma I-40 crosses a man-made lake and one of the roads intersecting is named Lottawata Road. I wouldn't have had the guts to propose that. Maybe proposed as a joke and it was accepted as a joke on the originator.

What about the town of Nowata, a bit north of Tulsa...

J Harp
09-27-2011, 10:21 PM
South Carolina has the Wateree River.

J Tiers
09-27-2011, 10:57 PM
Another Stupid duplicate deleted

J Tiers
09-27-2011, 10:58 PM
Now that I recall, on 51 north in Illinois, there are some interesting towns, like "Lostant".

I'm figuring that they likely never found that.




The town has ALWAYS been Jackson. It was the valley that was called
"Jackson Hole" It's only the stupid tourists that have been calling the
the town that.
...Lew...

I thought it was originally "Jackson's Hole" and was a rustler's hideout. Right? Wrong?

duckman
09-27-2011, 11:17 PM
And in Wisconsin there is 3 county roads that come together "H" "O" "G" they have a tough time keeping signs there.

Shuswap Pat
09-28-2011, 12:04 AM
Welcome to Canada - Salmon Arm, BC - bet you didn't know fish had appendages. My favorite is Spuzzum, which is 'Beyond Hope'.

Patrick

macona
09-28-2011, 12:19 AM
I thought it was originally "Jackson's Hole" and was a rustler's hideout. Right? Wrong?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jackson_Hole

rustamd
09-28-2011, 12:39 AM
Acu-Rite/Heidenhain is located on One Precision Way, always thought that sounded nice

Pete F
09-28-2011, 02:05 AM
Acu-Rite/Heidenhain is located on One Precision Way, always thought that sounded nice

Apple Computer is headquartered at 1 Infinite Loop in Cupertino... Anyone care to chime in with why?

-Pete

Toolguy
09-28-2011, 02:59 AM
New Pig is at One Pork Ave. in Tipton, PA.

dp
09-28-2011, 03:03 AM
Our local quaint town if Issaquah was recently in the news when a guy with two rifles showed up at a local school and decided to take several rounds in a suicide by cop scheme that worked great.

http://mynorthwest.com/11/553417/Issaquah-shooter-identified-motive-still-unclear

All supposition, so far, of course, but it's as good as any other theories.

Issaquah, btw, is linguistically interesting, and I've always wondered how it may have been spelled if the French arrived here first. Had they it may have be spelled Issaquois which is what happened to the Iraquah (Iroquois) tribe. An ancient language linkage between Seattle and New York? I suspect so. Fun to think about, anyway.

We also have the Dosewillipa, Humptulip, Skagit, Lummi, Duwamish, Suquamish, Sammamish, Stillaguamish, Makah, Muckleshoot, Puyallup, Quilleute, Quinalt, Snohomish, Skokomish, Nooksack, Nisqually, Yakima, Tulalip, and a zillion others for which towns and casinos are named. And Seattle is named after Chief Sealth so it seems we didn't get that right, either.

lynnl
09-28-2011, 11:15 AM
I have a tendency to speed read or just glance at words and sentences for the overall gist. For years I read the word Puyallup as "pulleyup."

Similarly, I was well into adulthood before I stopped mentally verablizing Don Quixote as "Don Quicks-oat." :D

Weston Bye
09-28-2011, 11:28 AM
I have a tendency to speed read or just glance at words and sentences for the overall gist. ...

Me too, or used to. Back during the first Gulf War, I read in Newsweek about a big bomb they were using. On first read I thought the passage read:

"...in addition to the destruction it caused, the bomb was so loud that it was thought that it would frighten the Iraqi
soldiers into defecating."

It wasn't until I read the sentence a second time that I realized that the last word was defecting.

But the misunderstanding in the first read probably wasn't far off.

lynnl
09-28-2011, 12:06 PM
Me too, or used to. Back during the first Gulf War, I read in Newsweek about a big bomb they were using. On first read I thought the passage read:

"...in addition to the destruction it caused, the bomb was so loud that it was thought that it would frighten the Iraqi soldiers into defecating."

It wasn't until I read the sentence a second time that I realized that the last word was defecting.

But the misunderstanding in the first read probably wasn't far off.


That's funny! Defecating.

I do that too, i.e read the wrong word into a passage. Of course when the result is nonsensical you catch it right away. But sometimes it still makes sense, tho a bit odd, even with the misread word. ...as in your instance. :)

BTW, my son-in-law made (machined) some of the guidance components for that bomb, or at least the T&D versions of it. MOAB - Mother of All Bombs.

TGTool
09-28-2011, 05:51 PM
I have a tendency to speed read or just glance at words and sentences for the overall gist. For years I read the word Puyallup as "pulleyup."

Similarly, I was well into adulthood before I stopped mentally verablizing Don Quixote as "Don Quicks-oat." :D

Thanks for the contribution, or in French, mercy buckups.

ricksplace
09-29-2011, 07:42 AM
Borups Corners, Ontario, Canada

38_Cal
09-29-2011, 12:41 PM
Going just a little bit off track here, but for all you old and former Jarheads, I target shoot with the Halls of Montezuma (Iowa).

David