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SDL
09-27-2011, 09:15 AM
When I look at my Digital photos on my HP LCD screen or the TV they look fine colours seem realistic, yet when I print them onto glossy paper via my HP6280 printer (5 inks + black) they all ways look dull and muddy. so two questions
Is there a standard test card you can download with blocks of colour.
How do you adjust the way colours appear on the printer?Steve Larner

flathead4
09-27-2011, 10:04 AM
Not to sidestep the question but...

I have found it is a total waste of my time and money to print photos at home. The many online finishing services or the local kiosks will provide much more bang for the buck, not waste your time and the colors look fine. The only time in the last ten years that I have printed color photos on my printer was for iron-on tranfers for t-shirts, etc and color accuracy was not all that important to me. My early attempts to get good looking prints from my printers did nothing but waste paper and ink - and time.

Tom

HighWall
09-27-2011, 10:20 AM
When I look at my Digital photos on my HP LCD screen or the TV they look fine colours seem realistic, yet when I print them onto glossy paper via my HP6280 printer (5 inks + black) they all ways look dull and muddy. so two questions
Is there a standard test card you can download with blocks of colour.
How do you adjust the way colours appear on the printer?Steve Larner

You have to calibrate your screen to match the profiles of your printer's inkset and paper of choice. Professional photographers calibrate their screens often, depending on the criticality of what they are doing. Every time you change paper type, you need to load a different profile to make on screen previews relevant. There are test targets available, from simple gray cards to arrays of numerous colors which are recognized by proprietary calibration software. Usually, a simple white balance or gray balance is enough to get you in the ballpark.

Understanding the way different colors of light effect your sensor and getting the correct exposure under a variety of conditions helps as well.

davidwdyer
09-27-2011, 10:21 AM
What kind of printer are you using.

We had an Epson which, no matter what kind of settings we used on the computer or printer, never came close.

Then we bought an HP. Out of the box it did exactly what we wanted.

Maybe all aren't equal, but with us, it was the printer.

SDL
09-27-2011, 10:55 AM
You have to calibrate your screen to match the profiles of your printer's inkset and paper of choice.

So where do you make these adjustments any links to a good guide?


Understanding the way different colors of light effect your sensor and getting the correct exposure under a variety of conditions helps as well.

But the picture looks fine on the camera tv and pc screen its only the print that is an issue.

Steve Larner

SDL
09-27-2011, 10:56 AM
What kind of printer are you using..

HPC6280 5 ink as noted

Steve Larner

Jaakko Fagerlund
09-27-2011, 11:21 AM
But the picture looks fine on the camera tv and pc screen its only the print that is an issue.
..find some back-lit paper then that has a meny for color corrections? :D

Usually the printer software/drivers enables you to tweak the color profile of your printing quite much, but I would start from your monitors settings (found under a menu) and Google some "screen color test" or something that will show you different test pictures and makes you adjust the monitor settings one by one.

HighWall
09-27-2011, 11:55 AM
So where do you make these adjustments any links to a good guide?



But the picture looks fine on the camera tv and pc screen its only the print that is an issue.

Steve Larner

I don't know any links. I have my own calibration hardware software combination. Most uncalibrated computer screens are set WAY too bright to correspond to ink on paper. They are primarily aimed at gamers and web surfers who like the bright colors. Even Macs, which are the darling of the photo and design world, suffer from being too bright.

Without seeing your files and prints on your own screen, I can't help you much more than that. Digital printing is an art form. You have to learn the medium and equipment variables.

mike os
09-27-2011, 12:27 PM
only way to get close is a photospectrometer like a spider or ione colormunki etc... otherwise:-

create a pic with several blocks of solid colour... colours irrelevant, but a full range, light dark several shades
print
adjust screen to as close to the colours and luminance as you can.

dp
09-27-2011, 12:49 PM
The help page for your problem is probably not going to be all that helpful but here it is:
http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?docname=c01124477&tmp_task=solveCategory&cc=us&dlc=en&lc=en&product=3194498

My own experience has been that JPG files produce poor quality print images. The problem is once a picture has been translated to JPG format the damage is done and you can't get the missing bits back.

For images I produce in my camera I use RAW and TIFF file format as all the data are preserved. To share the files in email I convert to PNG format to reduce the file size and there is generally also an image scale change at the same time. I convert most images to JPG to publish on the web as that format produces the best compromise of file size and image quality.

For files I will print I crop and rescale to the final size in TIFF format and try a test print. If all is well I'm done. Otherwise I will adjust the colors, saturation, contrast, hue, gama, and any other useful adjustments (depending on the graphics editor). I use an HP L7770 3-in-one for Photos and an Epson Artisan 50 for doing printable CDs, DVDs, and jewel case labels. Using quality glossy paper works fine. I buy brochure and flyer paper from Office Depot for the CD's for the weight and quality.

I print at no more than 600 dpi.

BillDaCatt
09-27-2011, 01:03 PM
Keep in mind that while the abilities of the modern inkjet printer are truly stunning, you monitor is capable of far more color variation and depth than your printer is. So it's perfectly normal for a printed image to look poor compared to the image on the screen.

One thing a friend of mine has done is to laminate the photos afterward. You might not think so, but laminating really makes the colors pop!

Also, inkjet ink fades when exposed to UV light. So any printed photo, even a laminated one, will eventually wear out due to fading.

Bottom line: If you care about image quality, upload your pictures to a photo center (or carry them in on a flash drive) and have them imaged on a big expensive photo machine. It costs a bit more, but your pictures will have much better color depth and will last far longer than the ones you can print at home.

Evan
09-27-2011, 01:53 PM
See my tutorial here:

http://vts.bc.ca/color.htm

DougC_582
09-27-2011, 02:03 PM
When I look at my Digital photos on my HP LCD screen or the TV they look fine colours seem realistic, yet when I print them onto glossy paper via my HP6280 printer (5 inks + black) they all ways look dull and muddy. so two questions
Is there a standard test card you can download with blocks of colour.
How do you adjust the way colours appear on the printer?Steve Larner

Two suggestions:

1) what others have said about calibrating your screen is true. Some software sill have a utility for doing this, such as Adobe Photoshop and similar upper-end graphics editing software. What you want is a program that will let you set up a "color profile" for your screen.
http://www.drycreekphoto.com/Learn/monitor_calibration.htm

2) the printer you have is an inkjet, which do not give the best quality. For the best possible photo printing, you want a dye-sublimation printer. Dye-sub printers are cheap in small (film-photo) sizes, but they cost $$$$ if you want to print full-pages. Only photo retailers will sell them, they are far too expensive for regular computer-printer places to bother with.

Here is one that can do 8" x 12" for $1170
http://www.amazon.com/Sony-Dye-Sublimation-Professional-Interface-Windows/dp/B002TK28YA/ref=sr_1_8?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1317145969&sr=1-8

Here is another 8" x 12" for $1640
http://www.adorama.com/DNPDS80.html

macona
09-27-2011, 02:16 PM
I use a Blue Eye Pro. Its amazing the difference between uncalibrated and calibrated.

http://www.lacie.com/us/products/product.htm?id=10154

Michael Moore
09-27-2011, 02:42 PM
GretagMacbeth ColorChecker (http://www.rmimaging.com/information/colorchecker.html)

cheers,
Michael

SDL
09-28-2011, 05:26 PM
Thanks for all the tips and links guys a lot to digest here.

To get me out of the $hite I did as suggested and went to a store and printed them there, Good news came out as good as on my screen so at least i know pictures were ok.

Bad news was I could only do 9x6 when I wanted 10x8.

So I shall be digesting the info provided and getting a screen calibrator as a starting point. I do have another 6 ink printer by epson so I shall try that as well. I shall try to calibrate what I have, as in the past it was goodenough for what I wanted to do.

Steve Larner

Evan
09-28-2011, 05:38 PM
The Epsons with 6 inks can also do truly excellent grey scale photos. There are available archival quality grey scale ink kits for Epson that produce prints that rival platinum black and white prints on the right paper. The inks are rated for 200 years when kept out of the sun. This is because they are pigment based instead of dye based.