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View Full Version : O.T. The late great TARANTULA migration...



A.K. Boomer
09-28-2011, 10:16 PM
This has been an epic year so far for Tarantula's --- iv seen about 5 on bike rides and just as many driving my car,
It' so cool that I live in a place that has these guys - they are very cool and very exotic looking, when I first moved out to colorado from michigan I did not know that they even existed out here but my particular area is a mecca for them.
It was 90 degree's today so I knew they would be on the move come dusk so I threw my camera in the car and headed out to find one - about three miles later here he was --- he made it all the way across highway 50 - both lanes and had only one (very dangerous) foot to go before safety so I parked a little in the road and waited for him to cross.
many don't make it to the other side due to traffic.

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r249/AK_Boomer/DSC02194.jpg

This guy was pretty big - don't let that line on the road fool you - it wasn't in the middle of the road - it was an extra thick sideline that had ended due to it leading to a side road, this guy was about as big as my hand minus an end knuckle if he spread out and I wear a large glove - he was about my hand and half a first knuckle just as he was.

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r249/AK_Boomer/DSC02195.jpg

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r249/AK_Boomer/DSC02199.jpg

They crawl at a lumbering pace but don't let that fool you -- they are very fast if need be...

chipmaker4130
09-28-2011, 10:34 PM
Hey! I'd love to see a spider driving your car. Got a picture?

Boucher
09-28-2011, 10:40 PM
They are on the move here in central Texas. They are pretty docile. I have found two in the house in the last week. Don't know how they are getting in but when I took a box off the upper shelf in the closet and found one about four inches in front of my face it was startling to say the least.

The old timers said that when they are substantial numbers moving late in the day that it is going to rain soon. We finally got a little rain yesterday. Not enough to fill all the cracks in the ground but we are glad for anything here now.

A.K. Boomer
09-28-2011, 11:08 PM
Hey! I'd love to see a spider driving your car. Got a picture?


That's where id draw the line -- if I caught one driving my car it would be no more Mr. nice guy...:p


Boucher that would freak me out --- never had one in the house - had on in the yard but in the house would be pretty intense - I would still catch it and let it go - they are cool and not a bad spider as spiders go --- now the brown recluse that's a different story and we have them too.......

Black Forest
09-29-2011, 02:23 AM
I saw one once in Texas crossing the road. It was so big it was casting a shadow.

As to the brown recluse spider, I was bit by one once. It took nine months for the bite to heal.

bobw53
09-29-2011, 06:39 AM
I haven't seen one all year. That's not normal. I haven't seen a vinegaroon (whip tail scorpion), barely any toads, nothing.

Then again its been a weird year, a REALLY DRY year.

Tarantulas are pretty cool, they(used to) just come wandering through the office here at the shop, I usually just ask them how they are doing, and they go on their way.

I don't like the rattle snakes though, we get one inside the shop about every 2 years.

I miss the toads, they come out when it rains. Thousands of them. they've got personality. Last summer, sleeping on the couch here in the break room. Damn toad sat there and watched TV all night, a bug would walk in the door, he'd go over and eat it, then go back to watching TV. That damn toad sat there and watched that TV for 3 fricken days straight.

Dawai
09-29-2011, 06:57 AM
If it's a "strange animal" it will end up here. I got a snake in my attic of my shop large enough to stand up and go into the wall 8 feet off the ground.

I have never saw a snake that large hereabouts for 30 years.. last time it was "called" a coach whip snake off Rockyface Mnt.. I don't have a clue what that was actually. a very long brown non-poisonous snake about the size of my forearm. Some kids shot it and I nailed it to a telephone pole and skinned it for them.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v85/ibewgypsie/snakeskininrafters.jpg
Not sure if this is the skin from the same snake, it has shriveled, was about the size of my forearm, has dried out and collapsed.


This one is too about that diameter.. not short and fat like a rattlesnake, or copperhead. I have not gotten to inspect it up close, but I am carrying my pistol again. A snake that large can break bones when it strikes.

Odds are it is someones "pet" that got loose during the recent tornadoes. The only picture I have saw of it was on a poor resolution video camera late at night, when it turned on the security lights and crawled into the ceiling.

I have chickens close by in a pen. Chickens bring rodents and other pests.. I have not lost any chickens yet.

Spiders.. well putting on my ear muffs about a week back.. I noticed a nice recluse spider in them.. what a thrill to think about being bitten in the ear by the area's worst spider. They cause flesh rot.. it turns black and must be cored out like a apple.

claymont
09-29-2011, 08:42 AM
Had one for a pet a few years back. Fed it crickets or newborn mice. It would catch all the crickets and roll them up into a ball and feed. Was pretty docile, escaped a couple of times. Would just pick it up by its back and put it in the aquarium. One of it's defensive means is to dislodge the hairs on the back of its abdomen, they're pretty irritating when they get on you. I can imagine it would be a bad day for any predator who got an eye or nose full. It would put up a very fine web on the glass, that's how it was getting out when I would forget to secure the top screen. Impressive looking critter right after it molted. Lived about three years.

davidwdyer
09-29-2011, 09:07 AM
Here we have bird spiders which can grow to about the size of a dinner plate.

http://www.extremescience.com/biggest-spider.htm

I'm not sure if the is the exact species, but its something like this.

sch
09-29-2011, 09:38 AM
One of the things I miss about bicycling in Arkansas, the Sept-Oct
tarantula walks, where the exclusively male (short lived) tarantulas
go hunting for sedentary females (long lived) to mate with. And then
there are the centipedes, 5" long black centipedes with red or yellow
heads.

vpt
09-29-2011, 10:11 AM
Poisonous things are why I am glad I live where I do.

I don't mind things so long as they can't kill me. I even let the spiders hang out by my lathe. The one last year got pretty big as far as big spiders go around here. The sack on him was about the size of a dime.

http://img683.imageshack.us/img683/2539/lathespider042.jpg

Harvey Melvin Richards
09-29-2011, 10:27 AM
I love finding Tarantulas. According to Wikipedia, females can live 30 to 40 years. Amazing life span.

One I found a few years ago.

http://i811.photobucket.com/albums/zz35/HarveyMelvinRichards/PA050335.jpg

A scorpion that was in the building at work. It's about 1.25" long.

http://i811.photobucket.com/albums/zz35/HarveyMelvinRichards/IMG_0810.png

My own pet spider, a cat face, one of 7 or 8 that lives under my eaves. The body on this one is about 1.5" in diameter. She a real monster and loves the moths that I through into her web.

http://i811.photobucket.com/albums/zz35/HarveyMelvinRichards/IMG_0813.png

lynnl
09-29-2011, 01:00 PM
I saw one once in Texas crossing the road. It was so big it was casting a shadow.




Hmmm, wonder why it crossed the road?

I gues it must've been the chicken's day off.

davidwdyer
09-29-2011, 01:33 PM
Hmmm, wonder why it crossed the road?

I gues it must've been the chicken's day off.


NO, it was to show the racoon or armadillo that it could be done.

Black Forest
09-29-2011, 02:01 PM
Why did it cross the road?

Duh,,,to get to the other side!

Evan
09-29-2011, 09:20 PM
When I was a kid we went camping on Mt. Hamilton at the Lick Observatory so we could hang out with the astronomers one night. In the morning we took the back road down the mountain. It passes through a minor desert area. When we reached the bottom the sun was just coming up enough to warm the road. My dad slowed way down because the road ahead looked strange.

As we approached the strange looking patch it became apparent the road was covered with thousands of tarantulas. It was some sort of migration and they were sunning themselves to warm up for the trek. It was impossible to proceed without squashing hundreds or more. My dad let down the tailgate on the station wagon and I sat with my brother on it as he proceeded slowly, leaving a trail of smashed spiders.

I don't mind spiders much or any other type of critter but that was a very creepy experience.

RetiredFAE
09-29-2011, 11:03 PM
When I was a kid we went camping on Mt. Hamilton at the Lick Observatory so we could hang out with the astronomers one night. In the morning we took the back road down the mountain. It passes through a minor desert area. When we reached the bottom the sun was just coming up enough to warm the road. My dad slowed way down because the road ahead looked strange.

As we approached the strange looking patch it became apparent the road was covered with thousands of tarantulas. It was some sort of migration and they were sunning themselves to warm up for the trek. It was impossible to proceed without squashing hundreds or more. My dad let down the tailgate on the station wagon and I sat with my brother on it as he proceeded slowly, leaving a trail of smashed spiders.

I don't mind spiders much or any other type of critter but that was a very creepy experience.

Used to have to go up to Mt. Hamilton once in awhile, saw that migration a couple of times.

Up on Mt. Umunhum, not all that far from Mt. Hamilton, there is a big radar installation , I visited it far more often that the observatory, there the migration was a yearly thing, the road would be covered with them for several days at a time.

Mt. Tamalpais and Mt. Diablo also have a fair amount of these guys crossing the roads.

We see them frequently here in the desert, they are pretty easy to get along with, so we leave them alone.

The scorpions on the other hand get made dead, then made into paper weights.

Wife got stung in the foot by one a couple of years ago, fortunately it nailed her on a very thick callus, no harm done the Dr. said. She felt the strike, but either it didn't inject any venom, or the venom didn't reach tissue that would be irritated by it. The Dr. just abraded off the callus and told her to keep an eye on it. No sign of the sting the next morning at all.

I thought it looked like a bark scorpion, having just read an article about them on the web. Everyone, including the exterminators, told us we don't have bark scorpions in Nevada.

So I took it to UNLV and asked a Entomology Prof to ID it for us, turned out it was a bark scorpion, and they are now being found frequently here in southern NV, coming in on lumber shipments and shipments of palm trees from Arizona.

Not very big, maybe 1.125 inches long, but one of the more serious stings when it comes to humans it seems.

We also have the giant desert hairy scorpions around here, they grow to nearly 6 inches in size, but their sting isn't nearly as bad as that of the little bark scorpion. Some folks (idiots are everywhere) keep them as pets.

Tony Ennis
09-29-2011, 11:12 PM
I had so many spiders in my basement I had to spray. The next day they were all over the floor, dead, mostly pretty small.

One, however, though dead and curled up, was so large I poked it with a stick first to make sure. It was enormous.

A.K. Boomer
09-29-2011, 11:16 PM
I call it a migration cuz that's what it looks like - they get on the move around this time and you kinda think it's typical weather related - but the thing is is all the ones iv seen lately I started noticing something - they were all crawling from east to west and that doesn't make much sense for a typical migration due to seasonal change - so I checked into it more --------- turns out it's just the male tarantula's and there just out looking for piece of tail -- and if they get lucky enough to get some then they die immediately after for reasons not fully understood...

makes you think they should have just ordered a pizza and stayed home and watched some cable...

Evan
09-29-2011, 11:53 PM
With many species of spider the male approaches the female and says "Eat me!"

The female then lets him mate and when he is finished she eats him, literally.

Grind Hard
09-30-2011, 05:07 AM
With many species of spider the male approaches the female and says "Eat me!"

The female then lets him mate and when he is finished she eats him, literally.


I was married to her for nine years... :rolleyes:

boslab
09-30-2011, 06:32 AM
i think tarantulas are way beautiful beasties, apparently they can choose if they want to invenomate or not and usually dont unless its a small pray item [that was according to a man in a pet shop that sold them, i certainly know nothing about the biting process!]
they actually look cute as opposed to the scuttling house spiders that sneak up on you!, however thousands of them crossing the road, that may put me off them!, good job they dont hunt in packs or we would join the food chain lol
nice photo
mark

Dawai
09-30-2011, 07:05 AM
I think I am more nervous about spiders than snakes.

http://images.emedicinehealth.com/images/4453/4453-4474-10729-42552tn.jpg
Brown recluse, violin, fiddleback spider bite with doctors care 8 days later. (jumping spider, brown spider) same critter.

They are everywhere.. Were in the tunnel going into a nuclear reactor outer containment.. they say the first exterminators ran out screaming.. when a guy did fumigate them, the helpers took coal scoops and shoveled them into wheelbarrows. A perfect environment for them evidently.. Warm, air flow.. moisture. and prey.

When you see them "inside" your welding helmet, the light makes them hyper-active.. triggering something?? no clue.. but they run around like on meth.

David

SGW
09-30-2011, 07:31 AM
All this talk of tarantulas and scorpions makes me glad I live in Maine.

Of course, we've got mosquitoes, black flies, no-see-ums, deer flies, and such that can make being in the woods pretty miserable.

vpt
09-30-2011, 07:41 AM
All this talk of tarantulas and scorpions makes me glad I live in Maine.

Of course, we've got mosquitoes, black flies, no-see-ums, deer flies, and such that can make being in the woods pretty miserable.


Yes the biting bugs suck (I hate bugs!) but at least they don't make you look like the picture above.

Mcgyver
09-30-2011, 09:54 AM
All this talk of tarantulas and scorpions makes me glad I live in Maine.

Of course, we've got mosquitoes, black flies, no-see-ums, deer flies, and such that can make being in the woods pretty miserable.

I'm with you, kind of feel affection toward the lowly mosquitoes after seeing the leg pic.

you guys can have your tarantulas & scorpions, as far as I'm concerned the only good tarantula ans scorpions are dead ones.

A.K. Boomer
09-30-2011, 10:16 AM
Tarantula's are basically harmless - even if you get bit their venom won't do much of anything too you - Im not daring enough to let them crawl on me - many of the locals here do that and I really see no reason to...

The leg pic your looking at should have everyone scared - that's from a brown recluse and they are nasty spiders and bite even when not provoked - like while your sleeping...

A.K. Boomer
09-30-2011, 10:19 AM
With many species of spider the male approaches the female and says "Eat me!"

The female then lets him mate and when he is finished she eats him, literally.


Yes and of course that's how the black widow gets her name,,, but that's not what goes on with male tarantula's -- they mate and then they just drop dead...

Evan
09-30-2011, 10:27 AM
they mate and then they just drop dead...

Yeah, salmon do the same thing. Swim a thousand kilometres up a river just for a piece of tail and then die. With that kind of programming built in it's no wonder that DSK got in trouble.

oil mac
09-30-2011, 04:49 PM
I must confess, I am glad i live in Scotland, The worst we have over here is the midgies, (I am certain they can bite through galvanised sheets) They make life a bit miserable in the summer, Although in the last twenty years, around these parts we are getting mosquitoes, So far they do not carry malaria
So saying we are getting some weird insects, must be due to the global warming, My son lives two miles from me, and was recently bitten by a weird insect, which left him with a 1&1/2" dia black bruise, His workmate was bitten by another one and was hospitalised for the weekend

Strangely tonight i was looking at an article on M.S.N. of a horrible big black centipede killing &eating a poor little lizard, Disgusting, I think i would have dispatched the brute pretty damned quick I personnaly do not like creepy crawlies, Anything with more than four legs is way O.T.T.!

I really admire you folks who can co-exist with these so &so things without getting the heeby jeebies ( could live without worrying about the snakes, even although they can be nasty over your side of the big pond, Maybe because they do not have legs?:confused: )
Dan.

Evan
09-30-2011, 05:05 PM
We have been noticing some new pests up here too. There is a new spider the last few years that looks closely related to the black widow. It isn't one but it has the same shape and type of carapace but is generally smaller without the hourglass. We also have some very primitive flying and biting insect. It flies over and when when it senses your body heat or CO2 it stops flying and falls. If it hits your skin it bites and draws blood. I haven't been able to identify it yet. We first noticed it last year. They only last a couple of weeks and then disappear.

A.K. Boomer
09-30-2011, 06:31 PM
Yeah, salmon do the same thing. Swim a thousand kilometres up a river just for a piece of tail and then die. With that kind of programming built in it's no wonder that DSK got in trouble.


Can't believe I googled DSK in hopes of learning something valuable :rolleyes: :p

anyways --- question - is it just the male salmon that undergo that change ?

there is another factor when it comes to salmon --- it is the re-introduction into freshwater and if its the male and the female then that could be the reason - even if it's just the male it still could be the catalyst, not saying it is - just an observation. there is a trigger mechanism somewhere.

polepenhollow
09-30-2011, 06:43 PM
Hmmm, wonder why it crossed the road?

I gues it must've been the chicken's day off.


It didn't cross the road.
It remained stationary and the road passed beneath it.

K Liv

A.K. Boomer
09-30-2011, 06:44 PM
We have been noticing some new pests up here too. There is a new spider the last few years that looks closely related to the black widow. It isn't one but it has the same shape and type of carapace but is generally smaller without the hourglass. We also have some very primitive flying and biting insect. It flies over and when when it senses your body heat or CO2 it stops flying and falls. If it hits your skin it bites and draws blood. I haven't been able to identify it yet. We first noticed it last year. They only last a couple of weeks and then disappear.



very weird about the dropping insect,,,


I thought male black widows lacked the hourglass but female ones can also - it can be void or yellow or orange and stuff. my motto is if its shiny and black then don't f with it... (just kill it)

Gravy
09-30-2011, 07:16 PM
It didn't cross the road.
It remained stationary and the road passed beneath it.

K Liv

When did this turn into a Chuck Norris thread?

Rex
09-30-2011, 10:40 PM
I live in the DFW area. We see a tarantula in our yard about once a year. I'm OK with that.
We see scorpions about once a week, and those DIE immediately, if the cats haven't already dispatched them. They are good about that.
Interesting and useful thing about scorpions: They flouresce under a blacklight. I mean they light up like a green Christmas ornament! So every summer night or so around 10:00 I walk around the house with a UV flashlight, and squirt some Raid on the ones I find. Keeps the population to a minimum, and it's a bit entertaining. Sometimes we let our houseguests do the hunting ;)