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gary350
10-06-2011, 06:23 PM
It is interesting how the same thing can have so many different names. Does this have something to do with your geographical location or what?

Roll pin, split pin, spring pin, compression pin, hollow pin.

Woodruff key, half moon key, half round key, half flat key.

Allen wrench, hex wrench, 6 side wrench, bent arm wrench.

Scribe, scratch all.

Puke, vomit, barf, whale, upchuck.

Can you think of more?

macona
10-06-2011, 08:23 PM
Roll pins and split pins are two different things.

As are the woodruff and half flats,

fixerdave
10-06-2011, 09:08 PM
2 reasons:

1) in general, it's because we're thieves. Most languages borrow words from other languages; English mugs them in the alley and steals them for all their worth. (that's a vague quote... can't remember the source).

2) for technical stuff, it's because men consider it cheating to read the directions. So, the engineers invent something, give it a name, and when we get it we just make up a new name for that new thingamabob.

Works for me...


Besides, what do you expect from a language that has you park in a driveway and drive on a parkway?

becksmachine
10-06-2011, 09:56 PM
This is not to be interpreted as a knock on Gary, but one of the reasons is that some people can't/won't spell correctly.

All and awl are two different words with completely different meanings.

Dave

BigMike782
10-06-2011, 10:06 PM
"but one of the reasons is that some people can't/won't spell correctly."
or refuse to learn nomenclature.....for example a mig gun is called a lead,whip or stinger,no,it is a mig gun.The nozzle on the end of the gun is a nozzle if one calls it a cone or a hog nose no one has a clue as to what you mean.Working in a hardware store teaches you if you use a term or word that is different than correct or common usage you may not get what you are asking for.......guess this is a pet peeve,you would have never guessed huh?:)

mechanicalmagic
10-06-2011, 10:21 PM
In the beginning it was called heliarc even though Argon was often used.
Later it was known as TIG, but nothing changed.
And then it became GTAW, a rather awkward acronym.

Similar changes were made to other welding process names.

I still use a TIG.

Iraiam
10-06-2011, 10:50 PM
Nomenclature is a problem everywhere. I have seen automotive engineers use "engine" and "motor" interchangeably.

Roll pin, Spring pin, Tension pin, Spring Tension pin.

Cotter pin, Split pin, Cotter key.

MIG welder, Wire feed welder

I got the finger wag from someone once because I called a high end computer I built a sweet "machine", apparently he thought a computer was unworthy of the term "machine".

macona
10-06-2011, 11:16 PM
In the beginning it was called heliarc even though Argon was often used.
Later it was known as TIG, but nothing changed.
And then it became GTAW, a rather awkward acronym.

Similar changes were made to other welding process names.

I still use a TIG.

The process was always called tig. Heliarc is the trademarked name of the inventors, ESAB.

firbikrhd1
10-06-2011, 11:30 PM
Another reason may be copyright infringement. Everyone is familiar with the term Allen Wrench or Channel Lock or Crescent Wrench but those are all manufacturers trade names. They are produced by other manufacturers but given more generic names like Hex Key, Water Pump Pliers or Adjustable Wrench.

madwilliamflint
10-06-2011, 11:31 PM
I wonder how much of it is the result of parallel evolution/invention.

Paul Alciatore
10-06-2011, 11:35 PM
There's as many different reasons as there are different words.

Want to stop it, try starting with your kids. Good luck.

jhe.1973
10-07-2011, 01:30 AM
There's as many different reasons as there are different words.



A great guy from the last shop I worked in was named Larry Allen.

He said all his wrenches were Allen wrenches!

:D

kyfho
10-07-2011, 01:52 AM
The one that caught me was these little grease fittings.

http://www.mrostop.com/images/1629-B.jpg

I grew up calling them zerk fittings. It wasn't until just a few years ago that I heard the term alemite.

I had a supervisor tell me to "go check the alemites" on a bender. He thought they were clogged. I asked, "What the heck's an alemite?" He just stared at me like I was stoopid! :rolleyes:

After he took me over to the machine and did some pointing I said, "Oh you mean the zerks." He said, "What the hell's a zerk?" :D

Circlip
10-07-2011, 04:05 AM
There is only one correct term, the rest are Americanis(z)ms :)

Regards Ian.

Kiwi
10-07-2011, 04:07 AM
To me a Cotter Pin and a Split Pin are two completely different a split pin is bent up from half round wire and commonly used on a wheel bearing Nut whilst the cotter pin is a tapered round pin flat on one side and drawn up tight with a nut on small diameter end commonly used on bicycle cranks can see it being called a Cotter Key some of the terminology makes you stop and think some escapes me altogether :D even in a population of 4 mill we have Nog in the north Island And Dwang in the south (the little piece that goes between the studs)

Davo J
10-07-2011, 04:44 AM
Grease nipples is what I was taught to call them oner here. I have heard them called Zerk fitting because they are on mills and the term is widely used on these forums, but if you asked me what a Alemite was before this, I like you wouldn't have known.

Dave
PS
Even spell check hasn't got the in the dictionary, it has Ale mite and Ale-mite, but not Alemite.

gordob
10-07-2011, 05:16 AM
Alemite is the company that manufactures the Zerc's ( Grease Nipples) the guy asking you to check them has probably arisen at that name because of the branding punched into the side of them

Tel
10-07-2011, 05:17 AM
Alemite is a brand name, not the actual fitting

http://www.alemite.com/catalog/

garagemark
10-07-2011, 07:19 AM
I've always simply called them "grease fittings". I learned the Alemite thing here.

JoeLee
10-07-2011, 07:33 AM
Lexan is polycarbonate..........Lexan I believe being the developer's (GE) trade name. The list goes on.

JL..................

JoeLee
10-07-2011, 07:35 AM
It's funny how we all know so many of the same things by so many different names. It's like being able to speak several different languages.

JL...............

gary350
10-07-2011, 09:21 AM
The one that caught me was these little grease fittings.

http://www.mrostop.com/images/1629-B.jpg

I grew up calling them zerk fittings. It wasn't until just a few years ago that I heard the term alemite.

I had a supervisor tell me to "go check the alemites" on a bender. He thought they were clogged. I asked, "What the heck's an alemite?" He just stared at me like I was stoopid! :rolleyes:

After he took me over to the machine and did some pointing I said, "Oh you mean the zerks." He said, "What the hell's a zerk?" :D

I have always called this a grease fitting. My father calls it a Zert fitting with a T. It is interesting how we all learned to call things by so many different names.

Lew Hartswick
10-07-2011, 09:43 AM
I've always simply called them "grease fittings". I learned the Alemite thing here.
I hope you DON'T use GREASE on the ones on a Bridgeport ways.
In that case they are OIL fittings. In particular WAY OIL .
To me they were always Zerks
How about the "quick" fittings on things such as aircraft access panels
that were invented by Dzus (sp?)
...lew...

radkins
10-07-2011, 10:20 AM
Most of these "names" are just someone calling it the wrong name, for instance how many times have you heard some doofus call a Cotter pin a "Carter key"? How many times have you heard "un-loosen" a bolt? "Half Moon" key (or sometimes they even call it a Half Moon pin :rolleyes: ) is just a goofy way of referring to a woodruf key, obviously because of it's shape. Then there are people who call a nut a "Tap", never did figure out where they got that one. The point is these terms usually come from someone who simply don't know the proper name and continue calling it the wrong thing.

spope14
10-07-2011, 10:26 AM
Often times as already noted this is because of original brand names then the names of the knock-offs. For example, Vise Grips are actually Lever Locking Pliers. Allen Wrenches were first made by the Allen company but the subsequent products others make are called hex wrenches. Bridgeport is still a mill type, though the universal vertical milling machine is made by hundreds of different companies like Sharp, Jet, ...

Xerox is still a copy to many of us, and though blueprints are seldon blue these days, rather they are plots, Xerox's, CAD drawings, you name it. The actual term now is technical drawing, but they are still called blueprints regardless by the vast majority of machinists.

I can still go to the auto supply supply store and ask for Zirks, Zercs, whatever and get what I want...

radkins
10-07-2011, 10:52 AM
The one I mentioned about calling nuts "taps" has me puzzled as to where it comes from. It may just be a local thing but I have heard that one for years so it's not really uncommon, anyone got any idea as to the origins?

SGW
10-07-2011, 11:39 AM
The guys who just installed the metal roof on my house called nuts "taps" too. I was totally confused....

This was in Maine. Where else around the country have you heard it?

J Harp
10-07-2011, 11:58 AM
There is another lube fitting called an Alemite fitting. It is cylindrical about 3/8 diameter and 3/4 long, with a sealing ball in the end like a Gitts oiler, and with cross pins sticking out the sides for a bayonet coupling. My dad had a grease gun with that bayonet coupling on the end of the hose, which he picked up when scrapping an abandoned Caterpillar tractor. It had an oval shaped tank which would have held 4 or 5 gallons of grease. The pump handle was horizontal across the top, and the whole thing was painted Caterpillar yellow. Another fitting which looks somewhat like the Zerk/Alemite, has a straight cylindrical projection about a quarter inch long and about three sixteenths diameter, with a ball seal. I never saw what sort of coupling the hose had, so don't know how it was supposed to work.

The nut/tap thing is also called a burr by some people. I once heard an old fellow complaining that he couldn't get the burrs off his tractor wheels so he could take them to get new tires put on. I went to help him, not knowing what he meant, and found out it was the lug nuts he couldn't get off.

Edit, My dad called nuts taps, and a Ford adjustable wrench was a Monkey wrench to him.

radkins
10-07-2011, 12:02 PM
I have heard nuts called taps for years and never did understand where it gets the name. A couple of years ago I went into a hardware store in Lafollette Tn and asked for a 3/4" coarse thread tap, when the guy asked how many I needed I knew what was about to happen so I said "just one, a plug style"! :D


I wonder how the name "Nut" came about?

aboard_epsilon
10-07-2011, 12:09 PM
how many of you call a vehicle a..

veeeee...........hic.......calllllll

all the best.mark

radkins
10-07-2011, 12:24 PM
Not saying one way or the other on this one but I often hear the name "Canadian geese" but shouldn't that be "Canada geese? Or not?

becksmachine
10-07-2011, 12:35 PM
The one that caught me was these little grease fittings.

http://www.mrostop.com/images/1629-B.jpg

I grew up calling them zerk fittings. It wasn't until just a few years ago that I heard the term alemite.

I had a supervisor tell me to "go check the alemites" on a bender. He thought they were clogged. I asked, "What the heck's an alemite?" He just stared at me like I was stoopid! :rolleyes

After he took me over to the machine and did some pointing I said, "Oh you mean the zerks." He said, "What the hell's a zerk?" :D


From Wikiedia;

The patent for the Zerk fitting was granted to Oscar U. Zerk in January 1929, and the assignee was the Alemite Manufacturing Corporation[1] (thus the eponymous names for the fittings). Today many companies make these grease fittings.

Dave

kendall
10-07-2011, 12:39 PM
Another reason may be copyright infringement. Everyone is familiar with the term Allen Wrench or Channel Lock or Crescent Wrench but those are all manufacturers trade names. They are produced by other manufacturers but given more generic names like Hex Key, Water Pump Pliers or Adjustable Wrench.

A lot of it has to do with tool makers common in that location and family influences.
when I moved back to Michigan after living out west for 16 of my first 17 years, My grandfather confused the crap out of me by having me run to the shed and getting the 'stillson wrench'. Found out that Stllson was a tool company, and he wanted a crescent.

Worse is when someone who really should know better calls you while you're on a delivery and asks you to pick up two hundred 2" long 1/2 inch bolts, nuts, flats and locks, but when you get back you find they're talking about wrench size not the bolt size.

38_Cal
10-07-2011, 12:40 PM
Not saying one way or the other on this one but I often hear the name "Canadian geese" but shouldn't that be "Canada geese? Or not?
Only if there's more than one! :D

David

Toolguy
10-07-2011, 12:56 PM
The rule is - Whoever shoots them gets to name them.

lynnl
10-07-2011, 01:02 PM
Not saying one way or the other on this one but I often hear the name "Canadian geese" but shouldn't that be "Canada geese? Or not?

I think it depends on their Home of Record, which is usually their birthplace.

One good way to tell is listen to their "honking." Canadian geese will make a distinct "Honk Honk, eh.." sound. :D

radkins
10-07-2011, 01:13 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada_Goose

This question came up a few years ago at a park near here when there was a lot of money spent on a sign for a water project, the sign said "Canadian Goose project" and it was pointed out by several individuals that the correct term was Canada and not Canadian. It became a comical situation at a couple of the meetings with some accusing others of making them look like ignorant hillbillies for spending so much money on a fancy sign and using the wrong term. It was somewhat of a joke for a while and I don't think anyone ever did come to an agreement, it became such a local joke the sign was never used.

lynnl
10-07-2011, 03:01 PM
Well if the project was in Canada, then it would seem to me that it WAS a Canadian goose project.

I suppose if they had enough room they could have made it read "Canadian Canada Goose ...." That oughta keep everybody happy. :)

Who knows where the geese are actually from? ...probably from lots of places.

Iraiam
10-07-2011, 08:07 PM
Not saying one way or the other on this one but I often hear the name "Canadian geese" but shouldn't that be "Canada geese? Or not?


We refer to those things as "sky carp" around here!

gary350
10-07-2011, 08:28 PM
The one I mentioned about calling nuts "taps" has me puzzled as to where it comes from. It may just be a local thing but I have heard that one for years so it's not really uncommon, anyone got any idea as to the origins?

I have a cousin in Illinois that calls nuts taps because that is what his father called them.

We us to have fun with the new guys at work by sending them to the tool crib for a, Can of Friction or an Electric Air Drill or a 4/8" Drill Bit. The new guy would ask and the tool room guy would look for it. Then the new guy would return and say, they don't have a 4/8" drill bit. LOL

.

Bill736
10-07-2011, 09:23 PM
Some names, although trademarks originally, still best describe things. For instance , I say bandaid, skillsaw, and crescent wrench as though they are generic . If the idea is to orally communicate effectively, then by all means use a trademark name. In a written document, however, more care may be necessary. Effective communication also involves targeting your audience, and playing to their level of knowledge and understanding. I was recently reminded of the OP's statement that there are many names for common items.
I was making an alphabetical inventory of the items in my small parts storage drawers, using index cards, so that I could consolidate and organize them. When I finished ( three days later) I found that I had used different names for some of the same items on day three as on day one. In general, I had gotten less precise.

M_C
10-08-2011, 03:26 PM
One of my favourites to confuse those south of the border is teeps.

RussZHC
10-08-2011, 03:42 PM
We refer to those things as "sky carp" around here!

Sure you got that spelling right? :D

Around here probably more accurate to call them "sky crap"...pick the wrong spot to walk, it's like a slip'n slide...[ref: Canada goose]

gary350
10-09-2011, 05:03 PM
mistake...........

Oldbrock
10-09-2011, 07:16 PM
Burrs I've heard before referring to nuts in an old world hardware in rural Alberta. A story I've heard, don't know if it's true, a new Aluminium company in the USA was starting up and had millions of brochures printed up only the printing company made a mistake and left out the second i. That's why everyone calls it aluminium except in the States where it's called aluminum. Anyone else heard the reason for the difference? Everyone around here calls a split pin a cotter pin and how about all the different names for a cylinder. Peter

Peter S
10-09-2011, 08:37 PM
Found out that Stllson was a tool company, and he wanted a crescent.

A 'Stillson' in my experience would get you a pipe wrench, probably made by Record (I am talking about years past, who knows who makes them now....)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pipe_wrench

Don Young
10-09-2011, 10:47 PM
A lot of it has to do with tool makers common in that location and family influences.
when I moved back to Michigan after living out west for 16 of my first 17 years, My grandfather confused the crap out of me by having me run to the shed and getting the 'stillson wrench'. Found out that Stllson was a tool company, and he wanted a crescent.

Worse is when someone who really should know better calls you while you're on a delivery and asks you to pick up two hundred 2" long 1/2 inch bolts, nuts, flats and locks, but when you get back you find they're talking about wrench size not the bolt size.

To those around me years ago, a "Stilson" wrench was the preferred name for a pipe wrench. Then later it was a pipe wrench of a particular design. Adjustable wrenches were either "Crescent Wrenches" or "Alabama Speed Wrenches" (if you worked in western Georgia). Linesman's pliers were "Kleins" and "Water Pump Pliers" were "Channellocks". Old auto water pumps had large gland nuts to hold the shaft packing and tightening them to stop leaking was routine maintenance. The large opening pliers did the job.

The British Whitworth system identified wrench sizes by the bolt diameter. A 3/8 Whitworth wrench fit the head of a 3/8" bolt. I do not remember the exact flat sizes.

mite5255
10-10-2011, 07:42 AM
My Father always called wing-nuts butterfly nuts, so one day Mums going down to the shops and he asks her to get some butterfly nuts of what ever size he wanted, sooooo Mum comes home with a box of mothballs :D

kendall
10-10-2011, 11:14 AM
Most people I knew called pipe wrenches either Irwins, or monkey wrenches.

3jaw
10-10-2011, 03:20 PM
So if the geese were from say Mexico then they would be called Mexico Geese and not Mexican Geese? :confused:

The Artful Bodger
10-10-2011, 03:47 PM
On our farm the Whitworth spanners were called 'Fordson' spanners and the metric ones were called 'Fiat' spanners, depending on which tractor's tool box they came from. Come to think of it, I guess the tools from the Lanz had all been lost!:)

radkins
10-10-2011, 04:40 PM
So if the geese were from say Mexico then they would be called Mexico Geese and not Mexican Geese? :confused:



Canada geese are from many places not just Canada so why Canadian? :confused: The ones in question were from Eastern Ky BTW.