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Steelspinner76
10-13-2011, 03:13 PM
2 new old mills being picked up tomorrow some horse trading and 75$
got em for me

one is (I think) a cincy 08 production mill
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v315/jap99/cinmill-1.jpg
Has a normal table not the rotary one.
Good lord is the quill on this thing big.

The second is a garvin no1 universal mill converted to vertical using a tree mill head I dubbed it Frankenmill
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v315/jap99/mill-1.jpg
It's been converted from 3 phase but the original tree big flat motor is included

I thought it a good deal for 75$ and some stuff I wasn't (nor ever would) be using

Question
Is there anything I should look out for on these. Known problems?

And how exactly do you work the collet system on the tree?

Now off to make ramps to load these hunks of iron

wierdscience
10-13-2011, 08:58 PM
I'd say you did very well and $75 makes it Toolgloat worthy:cool:

BTW-Welcome to the forum!

Lu47Dan
10-13-2011, 11:21 PM
Steelspinner76, nice score!
Where are you at In N/W PA. ? I am outside of Meadville.
Dan.

J Tiers
10-13-2011, 11:39 PM
I looked at an "08" one time.....

That one was pretty rough, but aside from that , I saw that it was about as "generally useful" as a brick...... table had one movement, and head had virtually no movement.... you set it up with fixtures.

I think some versions have what amounts to a rise and fall head, but the one I looked at did not.

That all said, it looked like it could rip off metal to the HP limit with any type cutter you could fit on it, it was really stout.

I turned it down, that wasn't what I needed at the time.

flylo
10-14-2011, 01:39 AM
If the flat 3 phase motor is good I may need it. Let me know if you want to sell it. Thanks! Eric

Steelspinner76
10-14-2011, 08:33 AM
small world Dan. I live up by Harmonsburg

Lu47Dan
10-14-2011, 11:16 AM
small world Dan. I live up by Harmonsburg
Yes it is, check your private messages for more information.

Now off to make ramps to load these hunks of iron
I moved the two mills I bought home by dis-assembling them and loading them on my trailer. The base of the Kondia had to be rolled up on the trailer will ramps, pipe rollers and a 1-1/2ton chain come-along. The Bridgeport base was light enough to be lifted with my engine hoist.
http://i236.photobucket.com/albums/ff14/Lu47Dan/Shop%20equipment/Milling%20machines/HB016.jpg
Dan.

daryl bane
10-14-2011, 11:48 AM
Did you get the collets for the Tree spindle? I can't tell if the spindle nose is original or modified. The Tree quick change collet system works really well if you know how to work it. Pull out the horseshoe collar(located near the end of the spindle end) a bit , unscrew the knurled ring on the bottom of the spindle , when this comes off, the little football shaped collet, a ZZ, should fall into your hand. These collets come in all the sizes, so you pick the size of the endmill you're using, just like a R8. Put the collet into the end of the spindle, and then screw in the knurled cap, but not snug. Put your tool into the collet, and with the horseshoe collar still pulled out, move the spindle up and down with the quill handle until you feel the collet tighten up on the tool shank, then either loosen or tighten the knurled collar until you feel (IMPORTANT) a slight over travel or (detent) of the quill handle. Now this will take very little effort or pressure to do this. Push the horseshoe collar back in, and go to work. To remove the tool, pull out the horseshoe collar a bit, not all the way and pull down on the quill handle, the tool should fall out preferably in your hand. If using the same size shank tool, slip it right in , find the detent point, push in the collar and away you go. When you get it down, tool changes are VERY fast. Hope this helps

Steelspinner76
10-14-2011, 02:13 PM
Hey daryl It's the original spindle. I got a few of the zz collets and working on getting more. Thanks for the instructions :) I just wasn't sure how exactly how to operate the quick change system. These are my first full size mills.
All my machining skills are self taught