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stix012
10-14-2011, 07:10 AM
Hi
Check out the photos of this Australian home made lathe

http://www.woodworkforums.com/f65/impressive-home-made-lathe-142287/

Cheers Jim

J Tiers
10-14-2011, 09:57 AM
Yowza.....

While it may have been made "at home", I just can't bring myself to call it "home-made"......

How about "factory built at home"?

Davo J
10-14-2011, 10:03 AM
Not to take it away from that one, but there is another one that sold on ebay on the second page.

Dave

sasquatch
10-14-2011, 10:09 AM
We have no idea what goes on in homeshops, very impressive and ingenious people quietly building their own projects.

Thanks for posting this, GREAT!!

Scottike
10-14-2011, 10:46 AM
Amazing work! He not only built the lathe, did you notice the "Goodies" on the back shelf? Milling attachment, Taper attachment, Indexable drill chuck?.
It also looks like he incorporated a lot of features in his lathe that he found desirable in a lathe over the course of his career.
George Bulliss - Got any writers down that way that might be able to do a writeup?

jugs
10-14-2011, 01:37 PM
Wonderful craftmanship......... But why :confused:

plenty of good machinery out there so why go to all that effort to copy whats already available ???? I can't see any innovations, in fact he's coped all the std faults in lathe design :confused:

kendall
10-14-2011, 02:02 PM
So, why two lead screws?

And looking deeper is the smaller one powered? can see both ends of it in the pics, but can't see a drive mechanism for the inner one.

jugs
10-14-2011, 02:52 PM
One is LH the & other RH :confused:

Tel
10-14-2011, 03:09 PM
Wonderful craftmanship......... But why :confused:

plenty of good machinery out there so why go to all that effort to copy whats already available ???? I can't see any innovations, in fact he's coped all the std faults in lathe design :confused:


Well, why do anything if it comes to that? Far easier just to sit on the couch watching TV. Perhaps the 'building' was more the point than the 'having'?

lynnl
10-14-2011, 03:27 PM
I'm wondering if it was ENTIRELY (all components) built by that individual. Or if he just cast and fabricated a lot of missing or unuseable components needed to complement other parts on hand.

That original thread wasn't altogether specific about that, so far as I could tell.

Either way, he did an amazing job.

Davo J
10-14-2011, 04:05 PM
If only the old bloke was around to tell us, or had of put a right up on the internet.

Dave

Mcgyver
10-14-2011, 04:39 PM
One is LH the & other RH :confused:

my guess is to suit the arrangement of gears in apron. I suppose its metric and imperial- that's an innovation i've not seen let along on a small machines...sure you can do the change gear but not near as a conveniently as with half nuts

as to why? I agree in this day and age. But its not hard to imagine someone doing so when a quality lathe cost what a car cost and the old boy worked at Consolidated Flange who supplied all the materials, facilities and his time, + he really really wanted to.

if everything needed a pragmatic reason this place would be a ghost town :D

Al Messer
10-14-2011, 05:01 PM
Hi
Check out the photos of this Australian home made lathe

http://www.woodworkforums.com/f65/impressive-home-made-lathe-142287/

Cheers Jim


AWESOME!!!

Al

Tel
10-14-2011, 05:14 PM
It's certainly a masterpiece! Remember the one Hubert built Al? A lot simpler, but a very nice job as well!

http://www.lathes.co.uk/elffers/

JCHannum
10-14-2011, 05:16 PM
There is more information here;

http://www.woodworkforums.com/f12/deceased-tool-makers-equipment-sale-142196/

The lathe was built in the 70's when the before the chicom invasion, when lathes for the HSM were much less available and affordable than they are today. He built the lathe to build a model Ruston & Hornsby IC engine. There are photos of the engine in the link above. A local newspaper writeup of the engine and at lathe when he built them;

http://www.woodworkforums.com/attachments/f12/184421d1318559838-deceased-tool-makers-equipment-sale-frank-parr.pdf

Alistair Hosie
10-14-2011, 05:54 PM
So, why two lead screws?

Why of course so he can have one for every day of the weekend:D

seriously I agree with my pal kendall a waste of time when there are so many good lathes out there unless your a natural bodger? and love to spend ages making a second hand inferior product,to what he could have had right away for less effort and maybe even less money. Alistair

gwilson
10-14-2011, 06:55 PM
A lot of the things I have done were not because they were practical,but because I wanted do do them.

I have made a lathe from scratch for automatically turning out tuning pegs,handles,and other smallish items that could be oval,or other shapes. I need to photograph it. No castings used.

Why? I wanted to do it,though I could have modified a small metal lathe.

sasquatch
10-14-2011, 06:56 PM
Anyone suggesting this guy was wasting his time building things instead of going out and buying a machine,, just doesn't GET IT!!:(

wierdscience
10-14-2011, 07:34 PM
Super Craftsman,like said he probably did it out of necessity at least partly.

daryl bane
10-14-2011, 07:52 PM
Agreed. There was a English engineer/gentleman named Roland Peck. who designed and built and beautiful 250 4-cyl dohc motorcycle. He determined that to complete the task, he would have to design and build himself a lathe, milling machine, etc. He designed all the molds, castings. I understand from eyewitness remarks that they were beautiful tools. He then built the bike, drove it around a bit, sold it and that was that. He then sold off the tools, as he accomplished what he had set out to do.

johnnyd
10-14-2011, 09:40 PM
Post #10 of that forum explains about the right hand thread leadscrew & the left hand thread leadscrew.:)

Henro
10-14-2011, 10:13 PM
While I don't doubt he built a lathe...I do doubt he built the one in the photos..."we found some patterns and concluded that..." does not quite satisfy my curiosity.

But who knows? Maybe someone will provide more concrete info...

All in all he seems to have been a very talented guy....

j.bain87
10-15-2011, 07:25 AM
I have made a lathe from scratch for automatically turning out tuning pegs,handles,and other smallish items that could be oval,or other shapes. I need to photograph it. No castings used.




George, wondering if you've managed to take any photos of this lathe of yours, please. :rolleyes:

John

JCHannum
10-15-2011, 08:30 AM
But who knows? Maybe someone will provide more concrete info...

That would be the newspaper article I linked to in post #15.

Henro
10-15-2011, 09:43 AM
I did read that article, which shows Frank Parr had abundant talent.

Did not see any pictures of a lathe though...

There is mention of his manufacturing a "small bench lathe," but who knows if that is the lathe being discussed?

When I look at those lathe pictures some things look homegrown while others look "factory made."

I still have my doubts...about the lathe...not about Mr. Parr's talent!

gwilson
10-15-2011, 10:22 AM
My little lathe is sitting unused for years,not in the best shape for pictures unless I get it cleaned up. And,I took off the countershaft as I just haven't the space for it.

I am sure if I took pictures,someone in the usual gang would be sure to find something to jump on me about it. I may get to it anyway,though. It's getting it cleaned up and moving it for pictures that I can't do right now,with the knee and thumb trouble I have been having.

Seems like several are having some kind of problem with the lathe shown in this thread already,instead of admiring an accomplishment. The man built the lathe because he wanted to.

Duffy
10-15-2011, 11:37 AM
I seem to recall that Evan built a lathe from scratch, AND started a "flame war" visavis the suitability of, gasp, WOOD for the bed. I think that it works very well.

lynnl
10-15-2011, 12:51 PM
Seems like several are having some kind of problem with the lathe shown in this thread already,instead of admiring an accomplishment.

Hey, some people are just that way. They'd complain if you hung 'em with a brand new rope! :D

gwilson
10-15-2011, 02:15 PM
I guarantee some of the usual gang will belly ache about it.

sasquatch
10-15-2011, 06:30 PM
Personally i,m getting tired of those knocking others projects on here.

Just what seems to be the problem with someone building a machine of their own?

I enjoy greatly postings of others accomplishments,, even if they arn't 100% perfect.(there are many talented small home shop guys all around the world building things , so why bitch about it??? -Always a puzzel to me !!

How about the complainers posting a few pics of their own builds?

Or,,,do they just buy everything they need?:rolleyes:

gwilson
10-15-2011, 06:34 PM
It seems like it would discourage others from posting their projects. This is not a desirable situation. We don't get to see what those unknown talented guys out there are doing.

Maybe I should post some projects in black and white,so the belly achers can't tell if it is made of brass? :)

sasquatch
10-15-2011, 07:01 PM
Henro go back to posting #14 and click on the "Elffers" lathe,, then tell us if this was really homebuilt by Mr Elffers.

We'd be interested in your'e appraisal.

j.bain87
10-15-2011, 07:32 PM
It seems like it would discourage others from posting their projects. This is not a desirable situation.


George, could you please check your private messages.

John

jkilroy
10-15-2011, 07:37 PM
How about a "Your Projects" forum where replies are not allowed only posts by the tread starter? I have seen similar on other forums.

Henro
10-15-2011, 08:17 PM
Henro go back to posting #14 and click on the "Elffers" lathe,, then tell us if this was really homebuilt by Mr Elffers.

We'd be interested in your'e appraisal.

I think the "Elffers" lathe illustrates the point I am trying to make.

By the way, I can't imagine why anyone would be interested on my appraisal! I am just a home hobby guy with some life experience.

Anyway, take a look at the Elffers lathe. Notice that the castings/weldments are not free flowing castings, but rather angled flat surfaces in design. More like a home grown lathe might be like.

Also, the Elffers lathe bed does not appear to be a casting, no professional looking name plates, and so on.

The flag in my mind is that after Frank Parr passes away, those remaining find some patterns that could have been used for casting parts of the lathe, and then they conclude that the lathe in the shop was therefore made by Frank Parr. Those patterns may have been used in the manufacture of the lathe, and obtained along with the lathe at some point in the past. Stranger things have happened.

The lathe may have been manufactured by Frank Parr; or, it may not have been. Looks too refined to me to be home brew. Yes it could be. Had the relatives been closer (at least in his shop) to the man that passed away, they would know the answer without needing to make a guess about it.

I hope I don't come across as being more than a skeptic. That newspaper article shows that Frank Parr was a very talented person. I, as most here, would like to believe he manufactured that lathe on his own. My intuition when seeing the photos simply strongly questioned the assumptions made by his surviving relatives.

In no way would I want to reflect poorly on the memory of a very talented home machinist.

If I came across as doing so I regret it as that was not my intention.

topct
10-15-2011, 08:26 PM
It seems like it would discourage others from posting their projects. This is not a desirable situation. We don't get to see what those unknown talented guys out there are doing.

Maybe I should post some projects in black and white,so the belly achers can't tell if it is made of brass? :)

Why are you so overly concerned? Sometimes there are projects posted here that need to be questioned.

Despite your proven ability you seem to be rather sensitive. I don't understand why. You have no reason to be so.

Henro
10-15-2011, 08:48 PM
For those interested here is a link to some good photos of the model engine that Frank Parr built that was the focus of that newspaper article...

See post #36.

Hope the link works...great pictures.

http://www.woodworkforums.com/f12/deceased-tool-makers-equipment-sale-142196/index3.html#post1387812

Rustybolt
10-15-2011, 10:49 PM
Wonderful craftmanship......... But why :confused:

plenty of good machinery out there so why go to all that effort to copy whats already available ???? I can't see any innovations, in fact he's coped all the std faults in lathe design :confused:


More than likely there wasn't any avaiable at the time.
or he did as a challenge.