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View Full Version : Picked Up an Atlas 7B Shaper!



japcas
10-18-2011, 08:41 PM
I've wanted a small shaper for a long while now and recently found one that wasn't too far from home. It's an Atlas 7B shaper and seems to be complete. It is on the factory stand and has all of the belt covers, the factory vise, the wrench that fits the vise and all of the adjustments, and everything is in working order. It was apparantly stored near some woodworking machinery as it has a little sawdust on it but I believe it will clean up very good.

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d39/japcas/Atlas%20Shaper/IMG_2828.jpg

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d39/japcas/Atlas%20Shaper/IMG_2832.jpg

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d39/japcas/Atlas%20Shaper/IMG_2834.jpg

http://i32.photobucket.com/albums/d39/japcas/Atlas%20Shaper/IMG_2846.jpg

C - ROSS
10-18-2011, 09:33 PM
Looks like a good pick. Good on you.

Ross

gwilson
10-18-2011, 09:35 PM
You got the original stand,too. Those are nice looking little machines.

wierdscience
10-18-2011, 09:48 PM
Nice looking shaper,real nice to have all the covers.

JoeCB
10-18-2011, 09:54 PM
Very nice machine. looks like the knee feed mechanism had been replaced with new parts, so all should be good there. I have had had one of these for years and it's a fun and very usefull machine to have in a home shop where odd "one offs" are the common rule. It may not be " high production" but with zero cost tooling it's very versitile. Be sure that the installed on-off switch is in place and works, this is used in conjunction with downward pressure on the belt tensioning lever to act as a ram jog brake. This neat feature may not be readily apparent to a new user.
Joe B

Dunc
10-18-2011, 10:29 PM
Very nice find. Well done.

dp
10-18-2011, 10:50 PM
Lots of places to find manuals for these but if you can't find one let me know.

J Tiers
10-18-2011, 11:49 PM
Covers, heck.......... They are almost a nuisance....... but HE got the VISE with it........

gwilson
10-19-2011, 12:03 AM
I have one of those vises. But,it is for their milling machine.

japcas
10-19-2011, 06:59 AM
Be sure that the installed on-off switch is in place and works, this is used in conjunction with downward pressure on the belt tensioning lever to act as a ram jog brake. This neat feature may not be readily apparent to a new user.
Joe B

It does have the brake built in to the clutch lever. I do need to get some new belts and make an adjustment to them as it wants to crawl when the motor is on even with the clutch lever in the down position.

He gave me 2 manuals with the shaper also so I'm all set. I also found a copy of the southbend shaper manual that I'm using for reference also.

J Tiers
10-19-2011, 08:15 AM
I have one of those vises. But,it is for their milling machine.

?????????????????????????????????????????????????

Do you mean YOURS is for the mill?

Because the one in the OPs pics is definitely the shaper vise........ The mill vise has 2 screw hold-down to the table.

sasquatch
10-19-2011, 08:55 AM
I too have been watching for the same unit.

Man that thing looks complete and in very good shape, even the paint.

gwilson
10-19-2011, 09:39 AM
No,yours has a 4 bolt base for shaper. Mine has a 2 bolt base for a mill. Otherwise the same vise.

My first mill was an Atlas. Saved the vise. I had an Atlas shaper we got on trade at work,but I traded it off. I wish I had kept it as it is a very beautiful little machine,and probably a lot more effective than the Atlas lathe or mill,but I have a larger shaper. I'd sell my shaper,as I have 3 milling machines plus slotting heads,and never use it.

japcas
10-19-2011, 09:59 AM
I'm considering painting it back to the original gray color, I'm not too fond of green. But I think it should clean up good even if left green.

Al Messer
10-19-2011, 11:35 AM
CONGRATULATIONS!! You lucky bloke! Have fun with it---it's a great little teacher!

Al

uncle pete
10-19-2011, 02:35 PM
Great score, It seems like the market for avalible small HSM sized shapers has started to really dry up over the last 20 years or so. Any that are being sold now always seem to be missing something. Belt covers, stand and vice just sweetens the deal. If? you don't already know about them, There's at least 2 Yahoo forums for Atlas mills and shapers with a lot of good info in their files.

I'd also agree about repainting back to the original gray too. My South Bend looks like it was painted by someone on a bad acid trip in the 70s. A real gross green with red,yellow and some white thrown in to make things "interesting". I get the impression, But can't verify it that my shaper and yours just may have originally been in a high school at some time because of the paint.

Pete

japcas
10-19-2011, 07:57 PM
Is there any way to figure out the age of these old Atlas machines. I'd love to know just how old it may be? The serial number on it is 013513. Any info would be much appreciated.

uncle pete
10-19-2011, 08:37 PM
Japacas,
I tried going thru the current owners of Atlas. (Clausing) I was inquiring about some parts, And they do have a real limited and REALLY high priced selection of parts for the Atlas equipment. I included my serial number of my mill and asked them if they could possibly date it. They told me their records don't go back that far, But it was probably from around 1946. You could try that. Then again they may have far more information about the shapers than they do about the horizontal mills.

Pete

Duffy
10-19-2011, 11:08 PM
Japcas, I have a similar unit except there was no stand. The serial number, or at least the number stamped into the top righthand vertical way, is 1497.
These units were sold BARE. Stand, belt guards were extra.
Mine came from the Royal Military College in Kingston Ontario, but a metal label is attached that says "Royal Canadian Ordenance Corps" complete with a serial number. It was obviously army, and probably dates from the 1940s.
The only part of the machine itself that is not original is the little cover that swings over the cross-feed stroke adjustment. Someone did a pretty fair job of fabricating one, and I am guessing that the original was thin cast aluminum. I had to replace the gear on the crossfeed where the pawl had worn the teeth down, but that was just a Boston Gear slightly modified. I also replaced the crossfeed worm and nut, but in my mind these are just consumables. I also removed the switch and installed an externally mounted one. I know that it is grounds for excommunication, but the wiring was a mess and the system, to my mind, was iffy. I saved the bits for a future purist, but that system did not come close to any current electrical code.
It is sure a fun unit to use and it will do SERIOUS work.

japcas
10-20-2011, 06:21 AM
Thanks for the info Duffy. I removed the motor for cleaning and when I unhooked the wires they seemed to have degraded quite a bit. I'll probably at least pull some new wire up to the switch, maybe even put a new power cord on it.

J Tiers
10-20-2011, 08:38 AM
Japacas,
I tried going thru the current owners of Atlas. (Clausing)

Pete

Just as a point of information...... Atlas Press Co. BOUGHT Clausing, but adopted the Clausing name basically to escape from the lightweight hobby lathe reputation that Atlas had.

Clausing made better, heavier duty lathes, and they were afraid that nobody would even LOOK at them if the "Atlas" name was retained.

dwentz
10-20-2011, 11:18 AM
I have collected lots of information an the shaper, as I have one myself.
I have it all on my web page at www.wentztech.com/metalworking
Select the equipment tab, there is an option for the shaper..


Dale

lazlo
10-20-2011, 11:23 AM
Just as a point of information...... Atlas Press Co. BOUGHT Clausing, but adopted the Clausing name basically to escape from the lightweight hobby lathe reputation that Atlas had.

Somewhere on the Clausing page they have a history of the company. When the Atlas Press company bought Clausing, they actually branded the Clausing lathes as "Atlas" for awhile. They didn't sell, so Atlas put the Clausing names back on the same lathes.

By the way, have you seen those old Eames arbor presses, that are now sold as Dake? That was Atlas -- they changed their name from GT Eames to "Atlas Press" to capitalize on their very successful line of arbor presses.

The Dake arbor presses that are sold today are identical, to the point that the parts are interchangeable.

uncle pete
10-20-2011, 12:51 PM
J Tiers,
Thanks, The details were awhile ago and yes you are right. Atlas/Clausing are REALLY proud of some of those Atlas parts tho, Over $100 just for a small ball handled threaded rod for example.For general information about Atlas parts, I was trying to buy both belt guards for my mill. Those wern't avalible, But they did tell me that they had a lot of drawings for most parts and did sell copies. For those impossible to find parts,That might be at least one way to go for any Atlas equipment owners. I may have to go that route myself pretty soon.

Pete

lazlo
10-20-2011, 03:02 PM
Atlas/Clausing are REALLY proud of some of those Atlas parts tho, Over $100 just for a small ball handled threaded rod for example.

Same deal for the Clausing parts: if they have them in stock, the prices are pretty reasonable. If the price is outrageous, it's usually because they're quoting the price to send the print to a local machine shop to fabricate it.

I've noticed over the years (since 2006, when I got my first Clausing lathe) that the parts stock has steadily dwindled.

bvd1940
10-20-2011, 05:48 PM
Lucky bugger, I have been on the hunt fer one of them thar shaper fer a bit now and no luck. We live in machinist shop vacuum here in SE Idaho and not much available here:mad:
Oh well I guess I need a hobby so hunting for a shaper will be it.

japcas
10-20-2011, 08:42 PM
I have collected lots of information an the shaper, as I have one myself.
I have it all on my web page at www.wentztech.com/metalworking
Select the equipment tab, there is an option for the shaper..
Dale

Thanks for sharing your website and all of your research. I especially like all of the links to the factory brochures.

Davo J
10-21-2011, 01:33 AM
I anyone is after one this one below is going on ebay in Waterford, Michigan,
http://www.ebay.com/itm/ATLAS-METAL-SHAPER-/220877333639?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item336d50a487

It's not as good as the one posted and missing the guards.

Dave

Davo J
10-21-2011, 01:39 AM
I have collected lots of information an the shaper, as I have one myself.
I have it all on my web page at www.wentztech.com/metalworking
Select the equipment tab, there is an option for the shaper..


Dale

A good site your putting together their Dale.

Dave

jhe.1973
10-21-2011, 03:22 AM
I have collected lots of information an the shaper, as I have one myself.
I have it all on my web page at www.wentztech.com/metalworking
Select the equipment tab, there is an option for the shaper..

Dale

Hi Dale,

Thanks so much for the wealth of information & for sharing it.

I also found your web site interesting & wish you well w/your projects!

dwentz
10-21-2011, 03:12 PM
Thanks for the kind words on my site. I like to gather up information on the machines that I have, and thought that I might save someone else the trouble by putting it all in one spot. Plus then I can remember where the information is when I need it.

Dale

japcas
10-21-2011, 09:07 PM
I know what you guys mean when you talk about not finding equipment easily. It seems like you look forever and then you run up on that piece of equipment you have been searching for. Then sometimes several items show up at the same time. I was searching Craigslist today and found an Ammco shaper for sale that is located fairly close to home. I'd love to go and check it out but I'm afraid I'll be tempted to drag it home too, and I really don't have the room. Here's the link in case anybody is interested. Somebody should give it a good home.

http://tricities.craigslist.org/tls/2600020440.html

WoodburnBob
10-21-2011, 09:12 PM
Great seeing a current post on this machine. I've been trying the last few days to align the table/vise/slides and associated plates, shims and gibs the past weeks. Theoretically, it should be a walk in the park for this machine to make something like 1-2-3 block within a 0.001 or two, or the proverbial apprentice's cube.

Jonathan, I hope you share your discovers as the courtship evolves.

japcas
10-22-2011, 08:31 AM
Great seeing a current post on this machine. I've been trying the last few days to align the table/vise/slides and associated plates, shims and gibs the past weeks. Theoretically, it should be a walk in the park for this machine to make something like 1-2-3 block within a 0.001 or two, or the proverbial apprentice's cube.

Jonathan, I hope you share your discovers as the courtship evolves.

I'll try my best to take some pictures of the work being done. Do you have any pictures of your machine? We'd love to see it.

gwilson
10-22-2011, 08:44 AM
In theory,maybe,but the Atlas is a very LIGHT machine. I'm thinking it looks more rigid than their mill,which I had many years ago.

WoodburnBob
10-22-2011, 05:40 PM
Mine is not nearly as nice as yours, Jonathan. For instance, you'll notice the ratchet case on mine had been dismembered in an "accident" of some sort.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v231/WoodburnBob/Atlas/full.jpg
I took the vise, table and cross slide down last week and indicated relevant surfaces for flat, straight and parallel on a surface plate. Once I understand what I'm going to do with the discrepancies (with what presumably was the original Atlas design/manufacturing specs), I'll move on to proving the ram slide/way is perpendicular to the vertical column slide/way.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v231/WoodburnBob/Atlas/two.jpg

The chunk of steel with the 4 hex nuts in the second picture is called by Atlas a "plate". Originally, it would have had a laminated shim. In effect, the plate-shim arrangement is meant to act, I presume, like a gib, sort of, aligning front-back tilt (nod) of the cross-slide and everything that depends on that alignment (table, vise, work piece). Mine had no shim. It is arguable whether this matters, since when running the machine, one is instructed to tighten all 8 hex nuts down firmly.

The main issue I'm having is around the related horizontal plates that hold the table to the cross-slide. Their alignment and stability do matter, since one won't be able to cross feed if their nuts are too tight, and having just the right amount of friction versus slop isn't supported by the findings I got from indicating surfaces and thickness. On my machine these two horizontal plates, one top and one bottom, were missing shims also. If I'm loosing you, the Atlas manual has a diagram of these various parts. Sadly, when I called Clausing for a set of shims, they didn't have any; McMaster-Carr has laminated shim stock as many have said.

By the way, there is a horizontal "real" gib and a vertical "real" gib, but I found them precise and they would be much less involved in my future attempts at shaping with some precision.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v231/WoodburnBob/Atlas/three.jpg

I didn't particular mean to go on like this, but I cannot imagine that I am the only one to run into this design-alignment issue. I've done a huge amount of research on line and in books about this. But I don't see much on line about precision parts that home shop brethen have actually made with the machine.

laddy
10-22-2011, 07:06 PM
I love my shaper! Same as yours Atlas on the original tabvle and legs. I think it is Great!!! Used it often. Fred

Al Messer
10-22-2011, 07:13 PM
Pardon me for asking, but has the Crossfeed mechanism been replaced by a South Bend mechanism instead of the original Atlas feed mechanism?

Al

WoodburnBob
10-22-2011, 08:29 PM
Al, I don't know. What you see above is what it was when I got the machine some years ago.

Here's the image of the South Bend off Tony Griffith's site:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v231/WoodburnBob/Atlas/img13.jpg

Here's mine from a better view.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v231/WoodburnBob/Atlas/PB120005.jpg

I always imagined mine was a questionably "crafted" "creative" kludge. It more or less works, but I find it an eyesore and temperamental. Bob

vpt
10-22-2011, 08:54 PM
Beautiful machine! If I had the room I would get a shaper but a mill will be the last machine I can fit in my shop. :(

Rex
10-22-2011, 08:56 PM
I'm considering painting it back to the original gray color, I'm not too fond of green. But I think it should clean up good even if left green.

Are you sure it was gray? My earlier 7 is a pale metallic green, and it's very obviously original.

japcas
10-22-2011, 09:36 PM
Are you sure it was gray? My earlier 7 is a pale metallic green, and it's very obviously original.

I'm pretty sure it was gray. The area in the back of the main casting where the motor mounts is all gray. Also the area underneath the stroke length pointer is gray, meaning that they didn't take it apart to paint it. Plus several bits and pieces are still gray.

japcas
10-22-2011, 09:46 PM
Mine is not nearly as nice as yours, Jonathan. For instance, you'll notice the ratchet case on mine had been dismembered in an "accident" of some sort.

Thanks for sharing the pics of your shaper. Your machine does look to be in fairly good condition. When I get mine all cleaned we may have to do a simple block project to check for squareness and flatness and compare our work. This may help us both to determine if and where they may need adjustments.

Al Messer
10-28-2011, 12:50 PM
I have collected lots of information an the shaper, as I have one myself.
I have it all on my web page at www.wentztech.com/metalworking
Select the equipment tab, there is an option for the shaper..


Dale


Good site---I like it.

Al

dwentz
10-28-2011, 08:08 PM
Mine is gray, but was green at one time. I do not know if it was repainted at the factory or is a primer coat. I have a 7AB which until a few weeks ago was a total mystery. But I found and on ad that shows both a 7B and a 7AB. The AB was the same shaper with out the belt guards.

I have seen some 7A's that were green from the factory.

Dale