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Westline
10-20-2011, 03:14 PM
Gents

I need your help on this one.
I'm tired of making stupid mistakes cus I don't listen to my own better judgement.
I'm compiling a list of Machinist Rules that I want to print and paste on my shop wall.
Every morning I want to get up have a smoke and a cup of coffee and bang my head on the poster till it sinks in or I pass out... :eek:

So far I have:
Measure twice cut once.
Sneak up on the final dimension
Listen to the machine
When in doubt add more clamps

Any more you can think of??

PS Sir John ....POS Bridgeport does not count as a rule:p

Westline

uncle pete
10-20-2011, 03:35 PM
Well everybody is obviously different, But what works for me is to sit down and write out each step in the order that the parts should be machined in. Sort of "Mental Machining". Usually most mistakes are found. A proper layout on your raw stock further helps to catch mistakes since you have a rough visulisation of your finished parts. Laying out your cutting tools in order of use and KEEPING them in order helps too. Once you've used a clearance drill in place of the tap drill you'll not want to repeat that mistake. Even the most experienced machinist in the world would still make the odd mistake. For one off parts on manual machine tools, I doubt there's any 100% sure way of having zero mistakes every single time for the rest of your life.

I tend to go way overboard fixturing any parts on a mill. So far, No parts moving on me..............................................Ye t! Drilling thru holes? Exta drill divots in vices and tables really suck. Check the clearance.

Pete

rohart
10-20-2011, 03:39 PM
Take key out of chuck

When it cutting is poor, check lathe spindle is turning forwards

Check the ground electrode is attached

Lock everything that doesn't need to move

Turn chuck manually to check for crashes

Check tailstock is locked down

The Artful Bodger
10-20-2011, 03:52 PM
Roll your sleeves up.

Put the goggles on.

Put the gloves on or take them off as the case may be.

Put your hand on the handle that needs to be moved next.

Keep the floor clear, mostly.

No rags near rotating machines.

Nothing on a shelf above or behind a lathe.

Dont rap the chips out of your files on the lathe ways (ha ha, I got that one out of the South Bend book!:) )

madwilliamflint
10-20-2011, 03:56 PM
I'm gonna need to buy a couple laminated copies of this. I can tell already :-)

Tel
10-20-2011, 03:57 PM
"Put the gloves on or take them off as the case may be."

No gloves - never, ever around the machines. OK for chainsawing, that's about it.

EddyCurr
10-20-2011, 04:00 PM
Stay away from tools when you are upset by something else.

Walk away from tools when something about the job upsets you.

.

goose
10-20-2011, 04:05 PM
Assume everything (tools, tooling, materials) is sharp and is just waiting to cut you.

Make sure the digital display is zeroed before taking a measure

Double check all's tightened with clamps and vise before proceeding

Check lathe is in proper gear before energizing

Forrest Addy
10-20-2011, 04:09 PM
Loose aprons and rotating lead screws will eventually give you a closer look at your shoelaces than you ever thought possible..

Oldbrock
10-20-2011, 04:16 PM
Put brain in gear before the machine.

Put tool away in its right place after you have finished with it, then you can find it next time you need it.

Fingers don't make good cutting hooks.

Clean and oil the machine every chance you get.

Clean up after the job is part of the job.

KIMFAB
10-20-2011, 04:18 PM
I have given up on lists.
I have an add-on Z axis DRO on my Lagun mill and I have several large signs telling me to turn off the Z axis.

The Z axis is still on and running the battery down.
I finally just bought a bunch of batteries and keep them on hand for fast replacement.

As Clint Eastwood once said "A man's got to know his limitations."

aboard_epsilon
10-20-2011, 04:35 PM
well its not only listen to the machine but listen to the cut.

all the best.markj

The Artful Bodger
10-20-2011, 04:44 PM
"Put the gloves on or take them off as the case may be."

No gloves - never, ever around the machines. OK for chainsawing, that's about it.


Actually, I was thinking about welding, heat treating tools etc.;)

Westline
10-20-2011, 04:47 PM
Walk away from tools when something about the job upsets you.

.
This is so true.... Thanks
Just like don't rush ......smooth is fast.

SGW
10-20-2011, 04:51 PM
Go through the sequence of machining steps in your mind before trying to go through them on the machine.

Pay attention to how tired you are. If you are getting so you want to cut corners instead of taking the time to do it right, STOP! and take a rest.

RussZHC
10-20-2011, 05:08 PM
Assume everything (tools, tooling, materials) is sharp and is just waiting to cut you

In a different way, I'd say a tool can never be sharp enough i.e. spend time honing HSS bits, FWIW in my limited use, a noticeable difference compared to just grinding

Plan. Possibly because I am so new at this and have little made in way of fixtures, fitting, gadgets etc. but the number of times a project turns out to need another "project", which needs another thing that turns into a project...

johnnyd
10-20-2011, 05:20 PM
Plan the work...

Follow the plan...;)

loose nut
10-20-2011, 05:26 PM
If all else fails, take up woodworking.

macona
10-20-2011, 06:00 PM
Do not sneak up on the final dimension.

ammcoman2
10-20-2011, 06:19 PM
Never ever work on machinery after having had an alcoholic drink - even a small one.

Geoff

2ManyHobbies
10-20-2011, 06:24 PM
Do not stare into laser with remaining eye.

No matter what your brain tells you, that wouldn't just grow back.

Machines eat humans. They are hungry because the last one was a while ago.

Superglue can be used as a substitute for stitches in an emergency.

Ooh, that would have taken a lot of superglue.

That rule doesn't contain 8, 16, 32, or 64 divisions per centimeter.

No matter how many times you've checked it, the spindle direction is still wrong.

The other button wasn't rapid traverse.

A 55-gallon drum of sawdust and wood chips weighs less than a 5-gallon shop-vac full of metal chips or grinding dust.

Those calipers weren't off by a factor of 2.54 yesterday.

Unsurprisingly, the shop doesn't clean itself -- yet.

It isn't a contest to finish it tonight. If it were, the prize would definitely be worth more than the accident that is about to happen.

jugs
10-20-2011, 06:31 PM
Work safely, live long, get buried with all the bits you were born with, (still attached) !!

Lew Hartswick
10-20-2011, 06:54 PM
Put your hand on the handle that needs to be moved next. )

Rather: "Don't touch a control until you need to move it" .
That seems to be the hardest thing to make the kids do in school.
...lew...

Gravy
10-20-2011, 07:01 PM
Measure once. Weld twice.

Hey - it's metalworking. Sometimes you can get away with it.:D

The Artful Bodger
10-20-2011, 07:08 PM
Rather: "Don't touch a control until you need to move it" .
That seems to be the hardest thing to make the kids do in school.
...lew...


I guess I would make a poor student....:confused: For example, when turning to a shoulder I put my hand on the feed lever and I make it clear in my mind that the moment the tool reaches the shoulder I will be moving the handle up.

Stepside
10-20-2011, 09:32 PM
Don't put your fingers where you wouldn't put you favorite body part--Teen aged boys know what their favorite is.

Trying to be a fast machinist will probably make you a half fast machinist.

Do you want it fast, quality or cheep, you can have any two but not all three--Now if you want it slow, crappy and expensive you can have all three.

Just becaus it worked last time does not mean it is the best way to do it this time.

gizmo2
10-20-2011, 10:25 PM
Some days, you will just have the fecal touch. Don't fight it, do something else.

Westline
10-20-2011, 11:22 PM
Do not sneak up on the final dimension.
I'm glad you mention this .... It was the way I was taught to sneak up on it but it is a real pain in the tail with carbide since it does not like light DOC.
What is the other reason???

Bill736
10-20-2011, 11:23 PM
My best vision is hindsight, and I frequently ask myself " what did you THINK was going to happen?" . If I can just ask myself that question in advance, I'd make a lot fewer mistakes. At my current age of 63, I'd like to think that my experience and "wisdom" ( a modest amount there) would combine to produce better results in most endeavors. That's often not the case, however, and I think I topped out about a decade ago. Poor sleep and fatique have taken their toll. Dealing with that situation, I look more carefully and triple check things nowdays.

Paul Alciatore
10-21-2011, 12:50 AM
Think first!:confused:

Measure twice.;)

Then cut third. :cool:

Pete F
10-21-2011, 12:59 AM
I don't remember where I read it, but I like it:

If you make a small safety mistake, stop and think. If you make a large safety mistake, stop for the day.

-Pete

camperkn
10-21-2011, 02:18 AM
Stay away from tools when you are upset by something else.

Walk away from tools when something about the job upsets you.

.

The first thing you do after breaking a tap, is to go get a cup of coffee.

ftl
10-21-2011, 02:23 AM
Gents
So far I have:
Measure twice cut once.
Sneak up on the final dimension
Listen to the machine
When in doubt add more clamps
Westline

The first one should be:

Think thrice, measure twice, cut once.

Tel
10-21-2011, 04:05 AM
Actually, I was thinking about welding, heat treating tools etc.;)

:D Fair enough, tho I rarely use 'em even for that.

Deus Machina
10-21-2011, 09:32 AM
Old one there, and agreed: Cheap, good, fast; pick two.

Electrical tape and surgical tape are the same thing. Or close enough.

Thumprints are like the lamp. No matter how much glue you use, it's pretty obvious when they're not matching up any more. (Only half my fingerprints are original, and I'm half some of you guys' age!)

If it's a stupid idea but it works better than anything else, it's not a stupid idea.

Those aren't enough clamps. You won't have to rearrange half of them to make the actual cut.

Newton+Murphy=Hawking.

Drop, stop, look, and listen. When you Drop something, Stop immediately, Look where it fell, Listen for where it bounces or rolls. If you're quick, you can see the wormhole open up and drag it out of the material plane.

MichaelP
10-21-2011, 12:40 PM
Even if you're an owl, avoid any decision making or critical machining late at night. Sleep on it.

macona
10-21-2011, 02:18 PM
I'm glad you mention this .... It was the way I was taught to sneak up on it but it is a real pain in the tail with carbide since it does not like light DOC.
What is the other reason???

You were taught wrong. Even with HSS take consistent steps. This will help account for stock flexing.

armedandsafe
10-21-2011, 08:10 PM
Here's one I learned last week:

Small steel chips think wool sweaters are magnetic. ;)

Pops

Kiwi
10-23-2011, 10:56 PM
Stop welding,gas cutting,etc an hour before closing up the shop for the night

Frank46
10-24-2011, 01:10 AM
When doing something in the lathe, I always keep a notepad and pencil along with a rough drawn sketch of what I'm trying to do. After each cut I measure and enter that number to make sure that the sketch and my 65 year old brain are still on the same page. Frank

lbhsbz
10-24-2011, 01:38 PM
Thou shalt always figure in tool radius when watching the DRO

Stepside
10-24-2011, 02:25 PM
Always remember it is an "edge finder" not a "center finder" or you get the .100 error time and time again.

TDmaker01
10-24-2011, 11:09 PM
one can never have any clamps

try to think of projects that require new tools (so you have an excuse to buy them)

stay away from those old miserable cranky fellers, Unless you want to learn somthing

if it aint broke fix it till it is

if you dont have safety glasses remember to do the safety squint

stiches are for the weak

old die section parts (such as cut off knives) are free paralells if they were going to scrap

if you borrow it twice maybe its time to buy one

a light film of grease can make things stick that you dont want to move much (measuring threads with the 3 wire method)

your boss is always right and dont need to admit they are wrong

DONT RUN YOUR CUTTERS TOO FAST

if you make a mistake, think for a while how it can be fixed, if you admit that you made a mistake and there is a simple solution that you missed you will look sillier than if you had of actually scrapped the part

nobody seems to weld suff hot enough

Its never the machines fault

ball bearings make good undersize reamers


and remember dont eat the yellow snow

RoyClemens
10-27-2011, 06:55 AM
When you lose a part or tool that is needed for the project to continue do not waste time looking for it, clean up. I.e. the chuck key that you know you just had in your left hand. If this fails, order/make a new one. The original will magicaly appear as soon as you make the order/ complete the new one.

Roy

sandro0125
10-31-2011, 09:15 PM
Always remember that machines have no conscience, right after they hurt you, they will hurt the next unsuspecting fool.

armedandsafe
10-31-2011, 09:30 PM
Put your tools away when finished with them.

Friday, I had to make a quick hole, so I grabbed a D bit and cut it. I then dropped the bit into the tray holding the tools for a continuing run of parts while I installed the piece I had just drilled. This morning I center drilled a piece of 1/2" rod with the #4 bit, bored it out to the proper depth with the flat faced 1/4" bit and got no swarf. hmmmm. I looked back and realized I had used the D bit instead of the #4 bit. :mad: SCRAP!

Pops

Toolguy
10-31-2011, 09:32 PM
I have this poem hanging on the wall in my shop where I can see it every day. It's there to remind me to always do my best work. This is my machinist code. It goes like this-

Good Enough - by Edgar Guest

My son, beware of "good enough"
It isn't made of sterling stuff;
It's something any man can do,
It marks the many from the few,
It has no merit to the eye,
It's something any man can buy,
It's name is but a sham and bluff,
For it is never "good enough".

With "good enough" the shirkers stop,
In every factory and every shop,
With "good enough" the failures rest,
And lose to men who give their best;
With "good enough" the car breaks down,
And men fall short of high renown.
My son remember and be wise,
In "good enough" disaster lies.

With "good enough" that's short
Of what you can do and you ought.
The flaw which may escape the eye,
And temporarily get by,
Shall weaken underneath the strain,
And wreck the ship or car or train.
For this is true of men and stuff,
Only the best is "good enough".