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motorworks
10-23-2011, 05:27 PM
Hi
Looking for ideas (less farming out) on doing 200 pcs of internal threads
It's M9-1.5 and approx 16 mm deep.
It has a counter bore of 12 mm approx 6 mm deep.
I have a cnc /mach 3 lathe with manual q/change
The speed is controled manually...i.e. not by the computer
The spot drill, TDS and counter are easy...
The female threads got me thinking...and then I cleared the smoke and though I would try for some wisdom here...

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ps Been doing the threads manually for years...usually orders of 50 or less...but now its gone up

John Stevenson
10-23-2011, 05:35 PM
Do the final threading op on a mill or bench drill with a tapping head, the threading will probably be the fastest part of the operation.
M9 x 1.5 taps are available. 5.00 each in the UK

http://www.tracytools.com/index.php?route=product/product&path=1_10&product_id=329

motorworks
10-23-2011, 05:49 PM
John
Got a tap-matic now and the tap...was trying to do it in one setup on one machine.
Though about the mill as well, but it does not have a tool changer.

Some type of gang tool setup on the lathe,the last step being the carrage bringing the tap close to the work and with a spring loaded "T" handle,tapping manually...hit a key carrage moves away and insert the next one...etc.

wierdscience
10-23-2011, 09:13 PM
Why not grind yourself a custom step drill?Do the Td,counterbore and chamfer in one shot with it mounted on the carrage and run the tapping head in the TS.

Grind Hard
10-23-2011, 09:21 PM
Custom tool is the way to go here.

Once you discover this trick production will skyrocket. Often times you can prepare a tool that will do two or three ops in one step.

It's one of the things I specialize in at work. Quite a few jobs require secondary hole modifications. I modify tools to chamfer counterbore and other operations in one pass. Since we've been doing this... 10 years now... production has skyrocketed on our mills. Tool changes have been reduced and cycle time has dropped.

I discovered this trick by accident while trying to re-grind a broken drill-bit.... upon reading some books I learned that this is a well-known "trick" for increasing production.