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View Full Version : O.T. - Another Robot - But this one is something else!



jnissen
11-01-2011, 01:09 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mclbVTIYG8E&feature=player_embedded

Petman - By Boston Dynamics. This is the same company that brought you the "bigdog" quadraped.

DFMiller
11-01-2011, 01:21 PM
Cool,
With a bit more work they can start mass producing it.
Good cannon fodder!
Dave

rode2rouen
11-01-2011, 04:13 PM
That outfit must have some heavy DoD funding!


Rex

loose nut
11-01-2011, 06:26 PM
Looks like a cylon to me

jugs
11-01-2011, 06:33 PM
Like my Mrs in a stropp,http://smileys.on-my-web.com/repository/Surprise/surprised-005.gif


......only better looking :D

aboard_epsilon
11-01-2011, 06:36 PM
watch out ..its the beginning of "Cyberdyne Systems"

Creator of the Terminator

all the best.markj

A.K. Boomer
11-02-2011, 11:50 AM
To tell you the truth that really is getting kinda weird to watch,,,

oh sure the first ones will be fun to trip up and find all their weak spots but then like the Borg they will all learn as a collective from their mistakes - and then? and then I already will have expired so I guess it's ok...

aboard_epsilon
11-02-2011, 12:15 PM
To tell you the truth that really is getting kinda weird to watch,,,

oh sure the first ones will be fun to trip up and find all their weak spots but then like the Borg they will all learn as a collective from their mistakes - and then? and then I already will have expired so I guess it's ok...

So, it's ok for your sons, daughters, grand daughters, grandsons !

to have a robot bailiff evict them from their home .

all the best.markj

Paul Alciatore
11-02-2011, 12:45 PM
Yes, it is starting to get scary. The answer is out there, from the world of Science Fiction, my favorite author: Isaac Isamov. He saw this problem years ago and formulated three laws of robotics. We need to adopt them world wide ASAP for any mechanism or computer that is built to "think".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Laws_of_Robotics

Of course these laws would eliminate almost any military use of robots. I, for one, support this. But I also know it is almost impossible to expect in the real world. Heck, we can't control a simple thing like nuclear weapons. The world is going to get scarier.

A.K. Boomer
11-02-2011, 01:29 PM
So, it's ok for your sons, daughters, grand daughters, grandsons !

to have a robot bailiff evict them from their home .

all the best.markj


yeah it's ok - me no got's any "sons, daughters, grand daughters, grandsons"

(not that I know of anyways) :)

just hope they don't build any of those "liquid steel" kind anytime soon - now those dang things are hard to kill...

A.K. Boomer
11-02-2011, 01:33 PM
Of course these laws would eliminate almost any military use of robots.


yeah but where do you draw the line on that one --- how much human input? in effect don't we already have them flying in the sky's " aren't they called a "drone" --------------- ???

is it just because they have wings instead of arms and legs that it makes it somehow "OK" ?

alanganes
11-02-2011, 06:06 PM
To tell you the truth that really is getting kinda weird to watch,,,

oh sure the first ones will be fun to trip up and find all their weak spots but then like the Borg they will all learn as a collective from their mistakes - and then? and then I already will have expired so I guess it's ok...


Everyone ought to read this NOW!:

How to Correct a Mistake That May Lead to the Ruin of All Mankind (http://basicinstructions.net/basic-instructions/2011/10/2/how-to-correct-a-mistake-that-may-lead-to-the-ruin-of-all-ma.html)

vpt
11-02-2011, 06:42 PM
Just wait till some hacker in his moms basement loads some new programs or virus.

fixerdave
11-02-2011, 11:31 PM
So, it's ok for your sons, daughters, grand daughters, grandsons !

to have a robot bailiff evict them from their home .

all the best.markj


The reality is that future generations of these robots will be our descendants, just like we are descendants from Neanderthal, and what came before, and before... (okay, we're not direct Neanderthal descendants, but we do carry their genes)

We all prattle on about how fast things are changing, but we 'aint seen nothin' yet. Computers can already whup me at chess (okay, an Apple IIE could probably have done that) and beat me at Jeopardy. Soon, they will be able to out-drive me, out-ride me on my dirtbike, cook a better meal (could probably do that now considering my kitchen skills) and probably do a better job of sorting the pile of screws I never get to sortin'. But, my kid will have to live through the indignity of having to admit that humans are #2 on the intelligence scale. That's gotta' hurt.

Like it or not, they will out-evolve us. They will be the ones that journey to the stars, that accomplish all the things humans have aspired to through the generations. I bet they'll even get those flying cars we're not allowed to have. Well, they will be the flying cars. Sigh...

Those suckers have gone from nothing to bipedal walking in less than 100 years. It took us, what, millions and millions and millions (in Sagan'ese) of years. We don't have a chance, even with direct gene manipulation, biology is just too slow.

bborr01
11-05-2011, 09:38 PM
I watched the video a couple of days ago and noticed all of the cables, etc. likely connecting it to electric, pneumatic, computer, possibly hydraulic and I had this thought. When the makers of the robot can unhook it from all of the support and run it on peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, they will really have something.

Brian

Weston Bye
11-06-2011, 07:10 AM
When the makers of the robot can unhook it from all of the support and run it on peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, they will really have something.

Brian

BINGO! Brian, you have defined the problem perfectly.



Some years ago, somebody in the military-industrial complex determined that the chemical timer fuzes on the current hand grenade design suffered degradation over time, giving longer delays as the grenade aged, potentially allowing an enemy to pick up the grenade and throw it back. Looking for a energy source that didn't deteriorate over time, they settled upon the spring driven generator. They developed the theory and several engineers worked on the project, but I perfected it and got my name on the patent. Little good it did me, as there turned out to be other techincal problems with the grenade, the general pushing the program retired, and the program was cancelled. I tell this story to demonstrate just one of the problems with energy storage. Not only the density of the energy, but its storage and transfer must be considered.

So far, petroleum has turned out to be the most practical for most fighting machines. Nuclear works well for ships and submarines. Chemicals involved in propelling bullets and rockets may have the greatest energy density, but they are difficult to control after turning them on. Energy storage and handling is always a problem, particularly in a battlefield situation. Fuel and ammo dumps have always been valuable and attractive targets. On the individual level, the soldier is likely to suffer more injury from a round striking his spare ammo pouch than his MRE.

I suppose that in short-term tactical actions like:

..to have a robot bailiff evict them from their home. A robot could be charged up, wound up, gassed up, or whatever, and let out of the armored personnel carrier at the front door of the home to do its job, as long as it didn't take too long, and the energy source couldn't be short circuited, jammed, ignited or whatever, during the mission.

I've always enjoyed watching robot movies, but have always had that nagging question in the back of my mind about where the propulsion comes from.

Rustybolt
11-06-2011, 08:41 AM
I, for one, welcome our new robot masters.

gwilson
11-06-2011, 09:02 AM
WHY,WHY,WHY,would you welcome our new robot masters?

They WILL be coming to evict you,and they will have no mercy.

Evan
11-06-2011, 09:28 AM
They cannot think which places them just slightly higher than a hammer on the machine intelligence scale. We have been working on the "think" problem and in stark contrast to the mechanical problems we have made exactly zero progress on the problem.

We have no idea how to proceed to solve that problem. There are no theories of "machine intelligence" that make it just an engineering problem. We don't even have what qualifies as a reasonable hypothesis.

The problem is that we do not have any idea of how and why we think. This is best summed up by a quote from Ian Stewart: “If our brains were simple enough for us to understand them, we'd be so simple that we couldn't.”

Weston Bye
11-06-2011, 09:54 AM
They cannot think...

Indeed, the best they can do is act or react. Though they may be sophisticated, they are merely Automatons. Good enough for certain jobs, but still in need of intelligent direction.

sansbury
11-06-2011, 11:18 AM
That outfit must have some heavy DoD funding!


Their neighbors iRobot recently laid off 8% of their workforce due to cutbacks in DoD funding. With Iraq and Afghanistan winding down and the super-committee unlikely to find anything, the Pentagon is already paring back in many things and might get whacked by a couple hundred billion more very soon.

Notwithstanding, it won't be long before the Japanese start using robots to provide healthcare for their vast and rapidly-getting-vaster population of elderly people. Power umbilicals will work fine in nursing homes. You think this is a jobless recovery? Just wait another 10-20 years when we won't need humans to change diapers or bed linens.

Rustybolt
11-06-2011, 02:28 PM
WHY,WHY,WHY,would you welcome our new robot masters?

They WILL be coming to evict you,and they will have no mercy.



but I will be evicted last.

aboard_epsilon
11-06-2011, 02:50 PM
but I will be evicted last.
No you wont ..any trouble and you will be terminated . :eek:

Make sure your names not Buttle or Tuttle :)
or the guys at the ministry of information will have you.

all the best.,markj

dp
11-07-2011, 12:32 AM
Yes, it is starting to get scary. The answer is out there, from the world of Science Fiction, my favorite author: Isaac Isamov. He saw this problem years ago and formulated three laws of robotics. We need to adopt them world wide ASAP for any mechanism or computer that is built to "think".

I, Robot was Asimov's version of Orwell's 1984. The robots were a proxy for a benevolent government - so long as they (the 'bots) followed the rules everyone was happy. Same idea with Colossus: The Forbin Project and a less metaphorical threat in Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged. You can probably toss Huxley's dystopic Brave New World in there, too. The lesson taught being don't trust in benevolence.

Or so the story goes. That was a recurring theme for quite a lot of authors of the time.