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Farrier-1
11-03-2011, 12:13 PM
Anybody out there ever made wine corks on the lathe?

I was thinking the I could come up with some sort of appealing taper, slot it the body and find an approiate sized rubber gasket or sleeve for a seal.

Jason

uncle pete
11-03-2011, 01:15 PM
Edit, I need to read the question better.

Pete

boslab
11-03-2011, 01:58 PM
made a corkscew, i like opening wine not corking it! [arent they punched?]
mark

dwentz
11-03-2011, 02:03 PM
We have some metal ones that have 3 O Rings on them. They look nice but do not work too well. Penn State Industries has some nice wood turning kits for about $6.00 each, there is no reason why you could not make the decorative part out of metal instead of wood.


Dale

armedandsafe
11-03-2011, 02:17 PM
My experience is that turning cork is a no-worky situation. :D What I ended up doing was cutting the cork to approximate dimension with a razor knife and then applying sandpaper to true it up.

It helps if you soak the cork first, but you have to experiment with each batch of stock to see how much shrink you get after it dries.

Pops

Farrier-1
11-03-2011, 04:13 PM
I'm sorry. I should have stated that I was wanting to turn them from 304 SS.

I've seen several pre-made versions for sale. But why buy it, when I can make it?

Pops, . . . . . turning "Cork" would be challenging :)

Jason.

Rustybolt
11-03-2011, 05:10 PM
You can reseal a wine bottle?

armedandsafe
11-03-2011, 05:38 PM
You can reseal a wine bottle?

Do you ever need to re-seal a wine bottle? ;)

Pops

Chris S.
11-03-2011, 06:07 PM
I've turned hundreds of stoppers from tropical wood, mostly from local yard trimmings and glue-ups. My stoppers use cork but they're not intended for re-sealing and storing horizontally. They're strictly ornamental, intended for table display. You can get resealable stoppers here.
http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/store/Projects___Bottle_Stoppers?Args=
http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/store/Projects___Bottle_Stoppers___Deluxe_Bottle_Stopper ___bot_stop?Args=

I can't attest that they securely seal for horizontal storage though. ;)

Mcgyver
11-03-2011, 08:25 PM
You can reseal a wine bottle?

this actually could be a nifty home shop project.

You can reseal a wine bottle however you must evacuate the air - I suppose white doesn't matter but a red won't keep once open....unless you remove the air on resealing.

There are restaurants/wine bars that have units that replace the air with some other gas, I suppose any inert would do, but not sure what they use. Reason is it lets them sell a small glass of wine from a very expensive bottle, ie lets them offer 300 wines by the glass. I'd use something like that as if I'm the only one drinking red, a half bottle is about right with dinner.

So there's the ss cork with tubes and check vales, regulator and some on off valves, all could be made in the shop in brass and ss...would look good and more wine is definitely a way to improve life :). not sure what gas to use, short of dragging the argon cylinder in, however the answer is probably just a google away

Rustybolt
11-03-2011, 08:31 PM
Do you ever need to re-seal a wine bottle? ;)

Pops


I didn't even know you could.
It sure explains a lot, though.
Cheers.

Chris S.
11-03-2011, 10:42 PM
Do you ever need to re-seal a wine bottle? ;)

Pops

Not prior to my doctor giving me a rash of sh*t about my liver readings after my last blood test. Now my wife gives me the rash of sh*t. :rolleyes: So now the cork goes back in. That said, it will be gone by the next day or so. So, white or red, it's not going to sit long. ;)

Bill736
11-03-2011, 11:03 PM
It helps if you soak the cork first, but you have to experiment with each batch of stock to see how much shrink you get after it dries.
Pops[/QUOTE]

Hmmm...a cork soaker, eh ? I remember a girl....never mind. As for evacuating the air from wine bottles, my efforts to preserve wine using that method have always failed. Many restaurants now use wine from paper boxes, with an inner bladder, to prevent air from entering. ( Well, the restaurants I can afford, anyway.) I've never been able to drink wine from a bottle opened more than a few hours before, since to me it always acquires a vinegar taste by the next morning. That's why I try to find the tiny bottles of wine to sample before I buy larger bottles. The paper boxed wines keep for a couple of weeks after opening, but the selection is limited.

dwentz
11-05-2011, 09:35 AM
Soak it water for a few days, and freeze it before machining? Just a thought!