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loose nut
11-27-2011, 02:45 PM
The way wipers on my lathe are made of plastic. If I loosen them off they let swarf under the saddle and if I tighten them up to stop that the way lube is scraped off. What is the best material for, what about felt, some people complain that it traps swarf and causes problems.

Any ideas, thanks.

Davo J
11-27-2011, 03:32 PM
I have some sort of molded rubber ones that came standard on my lathe carriage, but I have made up wipers for the cross slide and the compound and put felt in them.
I think felt is the best and it holds oil and oils the ways as it moves along. I clean mine every so often, but find the chips don't get past them. If small bits get stuck under it, the felt is only soft so I doubt it would do any damage to the ways.

Dave

J Tiers
11-27-2011, 03:49 PM
Rubber wipers should be used with machines that have oil fed to the underside of the saddle etc, not with ones depending on oil being "wiped-in" as the carriage etc moves.

They keep oil "in" as well as they keep it and swarf "out".

Felt is good

chipmaker4130
11-27-2011, 03:49 PM
I'm with Dave. I use thick (1/4") felt in contact with the ways. Some swarf/dust is going to get between the wiper and the way, but since the felt holds a lot of oil it just seems to glide along. My Burke mill uses rubber wipers and they do seem to push too much oil off.

moe1942
11-27-2011, 04:12 PM
The way wipers on my lathe are made of plastic. If I loosen them off they let swarf under the saddle and if I tighten them up to stop that the way lube is scraped off. What is the best material for, what about felt, some people complain that it traps swarf and causes problems.

Any ideas, thanks.



Have you removed one to see if there is felt behind it? And is there room to ut a felt wiper/oiler with the plastic wiper in place.

vpt
11-27-2011, 04:22 PM
I have rubber scrappers and on the inside of all the scrapers I have some really high density foam to hold the oil instead of felt. Its the kind of foam like some mouse pads are made of, not sure of the actual name of it. Works great!

http://www.hiwtc.com/photo/products/5/04/43/44375.jpg

loose nut
11-27-2011, 04:32 PM
Have you removed one to see if there is felt behind it? And is there room to ut a felt wiper/oiler with the plastic wiper in place.

Yes I have and there isn't any felt behind the plastic wipers.

Is there any special kind of felt that needs to be used or can I pick up what ever I can find.

sasquatch
11-27-2011, 04:41 PM
Good Question.

Not sure if you'd use just any old felt, like say what a boot insole is made of.

Carld
11-27-2011, 04:51 PM
The truth is your NOT going to keep swarf from between the ways and the carriage. I prefer felt because it does a better job of wipping the ways off. I used to pull the carriage off once a year to clean everything off. Now that I have a lathe with a taper attachment I don't do it. I just clean the ways real good once a week and then use a 50/50 mix of 30 wt oil and kerosene on the ways and move the carriage back and forth wipping and lubing until it come clean.

You can tell it needs cleaning when the oil film has a little color to it not common with clean oil.

OTOH I am particular about cleaning the ways all the time during use. I can tolerate chips and metal dust everywhere except on the ways.

Dr Stan
11-27-2011, 06:36 PM
I too prefer felt wipers as they can be cleaned up and/or easily replaced.

I learned preventative maintenance while in the Navy and one of the regularly scheduled PM's was to clean and re-oil the felt wipers. If you have swarf stuck in the felt wiper it's fairly easy to remove, not necessarily so with rubber wipers plus they deteriorate due to exposure to petroleum products.

One should be able to find felt at a local craft store, or from a general line industrial distributor.

BTW, I also faintly recall some leather wipers. Don't remember when or where, but I know I ran across them at some point.

PeteM
11-27-2011, 07:02 PM
McMaster carries a wide selection of felt (different densities, compositions). I've used a firm all-wool felt that's held up well in lathe wiper duty. Hard enough to hold up and keep most chips out. Porous enough to retain oil. Cut your wipers so they are a bit proud of the carriage. They'll compress to fit.

J Tiers
11-27-2011, 07:08 PM
Another good option is to drill for oilers and do under-carriage oiling..... Dunno about Atlas, but it works fine for Logan, and should for others also.

The swarf isn't the problem, it is the tiny stuff that is a fine powder almost... that works in and forms a paste.

Under- carriage oiling washes that all OUT.... not in.

sasquatch
11-27-2011, 07:18 PM
I Like the idea of drilling, then maybe installing some "Gits" oilers?

J Tiers
11-27-2011, 07:37 PM
I Like the idea of drilling, then maybe installing some "Gits" oilers?


Yep..... that's it.

lazlo
11-27-2011, 07:46 PM
McMaster carries a wide selection of felt (different densities, compositions).

For wipers you want "technical felt" -- I bought a sheet of 1/8" F1 (16 lb) technical felt at McMaster.

I usually sandwich the felt with 1/8" neoprene sheet.

kd4gij
11-27-2011, 07:57 PM
This guy sells way wipes for some of the older lathes http://www.ebay.com/itm/8-New-Felt-Way-Wiper-South-Bend-Lathe-Heavy-10-10L-/330398971084?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item4ced5034cc

RussZHC
11-27-2011, 09:17 PM
In process to adding wipers to carriage and tailstock (did not come with any sort of wiper from factory), I like the idea of undercarriage oiling.

Only thing related to felt...a remark or question...I am not sure I would trust just any old "felt", at a stretch I have read of using various felt objects (hats, clothing, boot liners etc.) and MAY use that, again, in a pinch but I know I have looked at places like craft stores and their felt is listed as a blend of synthetic materials...like previously stated you are looking for technical or industrial felt and to me, that is wool [and then get into the discussion about hardness etc.]

philbur
11-28-2011, 04:25 AM
Rubber or plastic wipers do the best job of keeping the oil in and the dirt out. All you need to do is make sure you have a means of getting the oil "in".

Phil:)

vpt
11-28-2011, 04:32 AM
Yep..... that's it.


Yup, did that too.

Didn't install the rear oil cup in this pic yet.

http://img99.imageshack.us/img99/7388/saddleoillers006.jpg

moe1942
11-28-2011, 09:02 AM
I have rubber scrappers and on the inside of all the scrapers I have some really high density foam to hold the oil instead of felt. Its the kind of foam like some mouse pads are made of, not sure of the actual name of it. Works great!

http://www.hiwtc.com/photo/products/5/04/43/44375.jpg



I like this idea better than felt. With felt it will disintegrate if its the wrong type. Does this HD foam absorb oil? If so it would cut and shape much better than felt.

loose nut
11-28-2011, 10:11 AM
Another good option is to drill for oilers and do under-carriage oiling.....

The lathe already has oiling points, ball type, on the saddle but I don't really trust them to do a good job so I oil (waylube) the ways every time I use the lathe

brian Rupnow
11-28-2011, 08:29 PM
I went to the local hardware store and bought some of the felt pads that are adhesive backed, for use on the bottom of chair legs. The adhesive peels off easy and the felt makes great way wipers.

vpt
11-28-2011, 09:00 PM
I like this idea better than felt. With felt it will disintegrate if its the wrong type. Does this HD foam absorb oil? If so it would cut and shape much better than felt.


Yes, my foam scrapper thingies will hold a full pump with the oil can each. And yes the form to the ways very nice and have no noticeable drag on the carriage.

lakeside53
11-28-2011, 09:45 PM
I use F2 felt from McMaster Carr. It doesn't distintegrate... works great.

J Tiers
11-28-2011, 10:32 PM
The lathe already has oiling points, ball type, on the saddle but I don't really trust them to do a good job so I oil (waylube) the ways every time I use the lathe


You can "know" if they are doing the job, you put oil thru them, and then either check the friction, or see if an oil film is left behind the saddle when you move it (wipe away old oil first)......

if friction is less, and/or there is oil left behind, then the job is getting done.

armedandsafe
11-28-2011, 11:26 PM
Does anybody use powdered graphite, as was suggested for my little 4 x 10?

Pops

Cheeseking
11-28-2011, 11:35 PM
http://i983.photobucket.com/albums/ae311/hambhelpr/Clausing%20Way%20Wiper%20Mold/IMG_0214.jpg
(http://i983.photobucket.com/albums/ae311/hambhelpr/Clausing%20Way%20Wiper%20Mold/IMG_0214.jpg)

Cheeseking
11-28-2011, 11:41 PM
I couldn't believe how stupid expensive the replacements were for my Clausing wipers. I decided it would be fun to make a mold and cast them just like the originals. Best I could tell they were polyurethane so thats what I used. Mixed it up and gravity poured. Mold was coated with a little grease for release.

philbur
11-29-2011, 06:28 AM
If your lathe doesn't have under carriage lubrication then felt wipers may be the best compromise, but surely, with under carriage lubrication, rubber, plastic, or polyurethane wipers must be the best choice.

And if you donít have UCL then get your drill out.

Here are some polyurethane wipers I cast earlier:

http://i186.photobucket.com/albums/x36/philbur/waywipers.jpg

Phil:)

lazlo
11-29-2011, 09:18 AM
I couldn't believe how stupid expensive the replacements were for my Clausing wipers. I decided it would be fun to make a mold and cast them just like the originals.

Awesome!

I just cut a polyurethane sheet with an X-Acto knife :)