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View Full Version : Anvil Restoration - Any one know a place doing it professionally?



Mensch-Machine
12-02-2011, 09:24 AM
I want to get the anvil I inherited from my dad restored. It was used heavily, and also damaged by myself when I was 10 years old (I was practicing welding, and starting the arc on the anvil, so it left pits- dad was none to happy when he'd seen what I'd done). It all comes back around, so now I'm the one unhappy with the condition of the anvil. I'm not sure the brand or weight, but it's big, old, and otherwise intact (and has significant sentimental value, in addition to its practical or monetary value).

I'm looking for a person or business that knows what they're doing and will do it right (in the US). Tips?

J Weber
12-02-2011, 09:38 AM
Check out this site. Lots of good info and good people there.Post some pics.

http://www.anvilfire.com/

Jim

lazlo
12-02-2011, 10:25 AM
Hollis, who occasionally posts here, does fabulous anvil restorations, including replacing the steel top. Shipping is going to be prohibitive though...

HWooldridge
12-02-2011, 03:28 PM
I don't think you will find anyone who does it "professionally" as a regular part of their business since there is very little demand for anvil repair.

I started fixing anvils because there were so few around me that were in good shape and new ones were not readily available then. I have repaired several - some by just welding up broken and chipped spots; others required a completely new top plate and heat treatment to achieve the necessary hardness.

It's hard work and I don't do it anymore - primarily because I don't like schlepping big chunks of iron around in the shop. However, if you can post some pics of the anvil, I'd be happy to provide some suggestions based on its condition. Please try to determine if any manufacturer's name exists as that can affect the repair technique.

Hollis

ticticdoc
12-03-2011, 07:13 PM
Why would you want to destroy all of that history? It shows the scares from all of the wonderful things your father made on it or what the ornery little boy did when his dad was not looking. Those would be great stories to pass on to the next generation to inherit the anvil. They would not mean as much when it looks new.

cuemaker
12-03-2011, 07:25 PM
Why would you want to destroy all of that history? It shows the scares from all of the wonderful things your father made on it or what the ornery little boy did when his dad was not looking. Those would be great stories to pass on to the next generation to inherit the anvil. They would not mean as much when it looks new.


Well, let me state I know very very little about anvils... But I am in agreement with the above statement.

That is of course if the anvil is completely useless in its current state. Then repair it to bring back to a useful life.

But if its mostly cosmetic, I say leave it as a reminder. A reminder of your dad and a reminder to teach the lesson you have since learned.

Just my humble .02 cents

Rosco-P
12-03-2011, 07:52 PM
Why don't you post some images of the top and other areas you consider damaged. Don't even think of having someone surface grind it. For one thing it's not supposed to have a dead flat, "shiny" surface like a machine tool. Without a little curve in the top plate, it would be impossible to flatten steel on it and if the edges of the plate are chipped, just smooth and round off the worst spots. Anvils are supposed to have a little radius on the top plate as well.

lazlo
12-03-2011, 08:10 PM
Anvils are supposed to have a little radius on the top plate as well.

On the edges. The top of the anvil should be flat. If there's a hollow in it, it's a pain to work around, especially in bladesmithing.

A lot of guys will flycut an anvil top if it's badly wallowed -- you can find pictures on iforgeiron.

SteveF
12-04-2011, 08:01 AM
Maybe one of these folks might know someone -

http://showcase.netins.net/web/bowerwelding/cgi-bin/hello.pl

Steve

oldtiffie
12-04-2011, 08:08 AM
Ask this blacksmith - but don't annoy her else her back-hander may well part your head from your shoulders.

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Blacksmithing/WomanBlacksmith1.jpg

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Blacksmithing/WomanBlacksmith2.jpg

gizmo2
12-04-2011, 10:57 AM
When you said it needed repaired, I thought you had perhaps sent it somewhere via USPS (US post office) They tend to be hard on things...

Forestgnome
12-04-2011, 11:21 AM
I would think a welder experienced in heavy equipment repair would be able to do a decent restoration, including hardfacing the top. They do a fair amount of fill and grind repairs. Please chime in if I'm off base here. Don't want to give a bum recommendation.