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View Full Version : OT- The Right Christmas present?



garagemark
12-05-2011, 05:53 PM
My 11 year old grandson wants a dirt bike; OK'ed by his parents. I have had them since I was 8, so I know what to get. The thing is, I know he's going to outgrow it in a year or so (and by then he should be ready for a serious upgrade). I'm not interested in used because there is nothing worse than a broken down bike, and I am far enough away that I couldn't get it going again easily (and his parents are NOT mechanically inclined). But here's the dilemma:

I have found a dealer that has a BRAND NEW 2007 with zero miles and full warranty for HALF the cost of a 2012 model. Would it still count as new in his (and his parents) eyes even though it's really kind of not?

By the way, it'll be a Honda 4 stroke, three speed, automatic clutch CRF 70.

Mark

vhenke
12-05-2011, 05:59 PM
I would think any kid would be thankful to get a machine with 0 miles - If not then maybe he need to get an after school job and earn his own - That is how I got my toys when I was 11 years young 55 years ago!!


My 11 year old grandson wants a dirt bike; OK'ed by his parents. I have had them since I was 8, so I know what to get. The thing is, I know he's going to outgrow it in a year or so (and by then he should be ready for a serious upgrade). I'm not interested in used because there is nothing worse than a broken down bike, and I am far enough away that I couldn't get it going again easily (and his parents are NOT mechanically inclined). But here's the dilemma:

I have found a dealer that has a BRAND NEW 2007 with zero miles and full warranty for HALF the cost of a 2012 model. Would it still count as new in his (and his parents) eyes even though it's really kind of not?

By the way, it'll be a Honda 4 stroke, three speed, automatic clutch CRF 70.

Mark

Gravy
12-05-2011, 06:10 PM
No brainer. It will be brand new and shiny, it's a Honda, and there's probably no significant difference between a 2012 CRF70 and a 1992 CRF70 (if there was one). The starter bikes go for a LONG time between redesigns.

Do it.

lost_cause
12-05-2011, 06:11 PM
we all know what sort of condition most used dirt bikes are in. they are used and not babied, so barring the one owned by your grandmother and only driven to church on sunday, a used bike is probably going to require frequent maintenance. the age doesn't matter really, it's the use that will wear them down. it's still new, it's warrantied, and it's already depreciated a lot. it's the perfect way to get into a not-worn-out bike at a great price. also, when it's ready to be upgraded it will command a decent used price since it won't have as much abuse on it (hopefully). i did a similar thing back in the day... in 1997 i bought a leftover 1994 fzr1000 for a little over $6k, and new 1000cc sportbikes were closing in on $10k then.

Toolguy
12-05-2011, 06:15 PM
I used to race motocross. I would grab that one quick. It's the best deal you're going to find.

Arcane
12-05-2011, 06:40 PM
I have found a dealer that has a BRAND NEW 2007 with zero miles and full warranty for HALF the cost of a 2012 model. Would it still count as new in his (and his parents) eyes even though it's really kind of not?

I wouldn't give anybody a present if they were the type to get their noses bent out of shape because it wasn't new.

aboard_epsilon
12-05-2011, 06:44 PM
CRF 70.

just looked it up

1960's engine design

not good looking

probably very reliable

but what counts to him ..is what his friends think of it ..thats what its all about these days.

all trhe best.markj

lynnl
12-05-2011, 06:56 PM
I'd think to an 11 year old kid, model year would not mean 'squat'. Just the fact that it's nice and shiny, and unused, means "My New Dirt Bike" to him.

I'd grab that deal quickly, before it slips away.

garagemark
12-05-2011, 07:12 PM
I may have implied that he, or they might look down on an old/new thing like this. Nothing could be further from fact. He is a great kid and would be seriously thankful for ANYTHING.... or nothing. And I suspect that his mother (my daughter) would be expecting a clean used machine. But I know what I did to my bikes, and as someone else mentioned, most used bikes are VERY VERY used.

I doubt if he even suspects anything like this is going to happen. He's been asking for several years, and I had dirt devils when I was a way younger than he. But since I am missing a finger or two and have a pin in my ankle because of dumb stuff on two wheels (I raced), I have been very careful to assess his maturity level. And I just now think it's time.

It'll be a done deal in the morning. And the money saved on the bike will go for body armor and boots. I got him a full face racing helmet months ago when I taught him to drive the Rhino. His level headed decision making in the Rhino was the deciding factor for getting his own solo wheels.

Now I have to get one so I can ride with him. YEAH BABY!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :D

Thanks all,
Mark

BMW Rider
12-05-2011, 07:25 PM
Can you be my Grandpa too.

Damn, I would have thought I'd died and gone to heaven if a motorcycle showed up under our Christmas tree. I had bikes, but they were the little kit bikes with the Briggs and Scrapiron engines. I can't complain nowadays though with four bikes in the stable.

I'd grab that 07 and put the difference into some good riding gear for him.

justanengineer
12-05-2011, 08:45 PM
Call me "old fashioned" at 28, but Im rather thankful my parents (early 70s now) were from another generation that believed in making their kids work for things. I was a "good kid" too, but my parents only spoiled me once (new truck at 16, that I shared with Mom for 2 yrs before it was gifted), choosing not to do so otherwise for other reasons beside personality. They would "gift" me, buying a toy like a used bike, then Dad and/or siblings would help me rebuild it often better than new, thereby forcing me to both appreciate it and teaching me its design. I could then ride, find the machine's limits, and knew how to tune it/improve upon it, which led to quite a few trophies despite a low budget.

I say save your money and help the kid out by giving him an investment more in time than money. You said it best - he will appreciate anything you give him. Take it from someone who's been there - after youre gone, the fun he had on the bike wont be that important, but the memory of rebuilding his prize toy with Grandpa will be huge.

To answer your original question, 2007 vs 2012 makes little difference. He will likely outgrow the bike long before he should consider racing, so having the latest model will make little difference. Should one of his "friends" make a derogatory comment about it being an 07, he has the wrong sort of friends.

dp
12-05-2011, 11:37 PM
I'd like a Makaha Ukulele - a tenor would do. I'll probably settle for a Costco special...

J. Randall
12-06-2011, 01:57 AM
Call me "old fashioned" at 28, but Im rather thankful my parents (early 70s now) were from another generation that believed in making their kids work for things. I was a "good kid" too, but my parents only spoiled me once (new truck at 16, that I shared with Mom for 2 yrs before it was gifted), choosing not to do so otherwise for other reasons beside personality. They would "gift" me, buying a toy like a used bike, then Dad and/or siblings would help me rebuild it often better than new, thereby forcing me to both appreciate it and teaching me its design. I could then ride, find the machine's limits, and knew how to tune it/improve upon it, which led to quite a few trophies despite a low budget.

I say save your money and help the kid out by giving him an investment more in time than money. You said it best - he will appreciate anything you give him. Take it from someone who's been there - after youre gone, the fun he had on the bike wont be that important, but the memory of rebuilding his prize toy with Grandpa will be huge.

Did you miss the part where he stated he would be to far away to be any help on an old bike that needed work?
James

Black Forest
12-06-2011, 03:09 AM
Don't listen to Justanengineer he is just a kid himself.

Buy the bike and hopefully you will be there when he sees the bike for the first time on Christmas morning. That look will be burned in your mind until you die.

There are many ways to teach life lessons.

madwilliamflint
12-06-2011, 11:11 AM
Given what you're saying about his temperament and what everybody else is saying about the deal that is the bike itself, it sounds like a serendipitous match.

Sure sounds like a huge gift.

garagemark
12-06-2011, 11:27 AM
Done deal.

Thanks guys.