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daveo
12-18-2011, 10:34 PM
Im thinking about making a small horizontal/vertical band saw. I have a 4 by 6 in my garage but I would like a small version in my basement (with my small machines) Im thinking up to 2 inch capacity. Anyone ever do such a thing?

darryl
12-18-2011, 10:39 PM
No, haven't done that, but I would suggest that you don't go smaller in diameter for the wheels since that would lead to short blade life. In my opinion, the wheels on the 4x6 bandsaws are too small already- I've had issues with cracking all around the blade on mine.

bborr01
12-18-2011, 10:44 PM
Building your own sounds like a fun project. But something like a portaband is a pretty nice way to go.

I got one a few years ago and use it a lot. You can also get a stand to make it work like a 4X6 guillotine bandsaw. Might be worth considering.

If you do end up building your own, please post some pics of the build.

Brian

J. R. Williams
12-18-2011, 10:53 PM
Check the Host's magazine index and you will find an article on building a small band saw..

JRW

rockcombo
12-18-2011, 11:04 PM
micromark sells one , might be worth taking a look at to get ideas and blade sizes .
http://www.micromark.com/variable-speed-mini-bandsaw,7913.html

mlucek
12-19-2011, 03:42 PM
That's actually a Proxxon band saw. I bought one a few years ago. It's also sold under the MicroMark name and I've seen it in various places on the web.

http://www.amazon.com/Proxxon-37172-MBS-Micro-Band/dp/B001D6PJAQ

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41CN9ZGh2jL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

It actually words pretty good for small brass/AL/steel stock. Certainly better then a vise and a hacksaw. I even cut 2-1/2" steel bar with it. Took forever :p and probably was way beyond the saw's capabilities :rolleyes:

A good review which prompted me to get buy the saw:

http://thehobbyistmachineshop.com/shop26.html

Conclusion from review:

This saw is not designed to be a competitor with full size band saws. Don't buy this one if you have full size work to be done. If the need is to cut small parts from thin materials then this saw will do it quickly and with style.

My intention at THMS is to use it for cutting small steel, brass and aluminum parts for use in my machining projects and metal constructed models. This is a must have tool for anyone building scale models from real life materials. Small scale live steamers, scale boat builders, doll house details come to mind. This saw is a "big brother" companion for the type of work done with a scroll saw as it has a larger blade. It works best for less detailed and straighter cuts.
I recommend it too for small hope shop use :)

Mike

Evan
12-19-2011, 04:03 PM
This sounds like a heck of a good idea. A half scale horizontal band saw would be perfect for my downstairs shop. It isn't expensive to have bimetal blades made to order, especially if you order half a dozen or so. I even have the perfect motor for it, a 300 watt brushless motor with built in speed control.

That just went on my project list. I am starting to plan for downsizing the shop in the future and I want it all done before we eventually must move to easier to maintain quarters. A band saw is an absolute must have item.

Dr Stan
12-19-2011, 04:25 PM
What about a power hacksaw? That way you would not have the too small of a wheel issue.

daveo
12-19-2011, 05:10 PM
This sounds like a heck of a good idea. A half scale horizontal band saw would be perfect for my downstairs shop. It isn't expensive to have bimetal blades made to order, especially if you order half a dozen or so. I even have the perfect motor for it, a 300 watt brushless motor with built in speed control.

That just went on my project list. I am starting to plan for downsizing the shop in the future and I want it all done before we eventually must move to easier to maintain quarters. A band saw is an absolute must have item.
This is my only hang up, I know absolutely nothing about the motor or where to get the speed control!

sasquatch
12-19-2011, 05:35 PM
I built a small one about 18 years ago at least and it has cut perfectly for a lot of years.

Had to make up the guides, the reason i mention this as mine is for cutting wood, -BUT,,the wheels,,, i found an easy source for them,, mine are cast 10 inches in diameter and i got them from the scrap yard off old piston water pumps.
I balanced them (they will all be out of balance,) by placing them on a shaft on a pair of levelled knife edges, and being spoked, (i didn,t want to start drilling them,) i simply balanced them by wrapping solder around the spokes here and there untill they balanced out.
This has worked very good for me.
A tire was installed with glue, think it was the yellow 3M brand weatherstripping glue, the tire was simply cut in strips from a heavy truck inner tube, then sanded off any high spots,(the thickness of the rubber varied,) the thing has run flawlessly for years.
The guides i used what i had at the time which were small bearings, the backup bearing is larger, i,m not sure what that was off , the bearing adjustment is a knurled small knob off an old sewing machine.

There,s a LOT of joy in building something like this and having it run for a long time. Nice to see people building things like this today.

darryl
12-19-2011, 08:09 PM
Yes, it's very satisfying to build your own useful machine and have it work well. What comes to mind for me is my drum sander. I just changed the belt on it last week- it uses 4x36 sanding belts- and now it's like new again. It's been working for more than ten years with almost no problems at all.

At one time I had a plan to 'upgrade' my bandsaw. This would have meant using a blade about 20 feet long, with wheels and structure built into the floor and ceiling of the shop. The structural situation in my shop is such that it wouldn't interfere with anything else, since the frame of the device would lay against a wall, and the table would be in the clear for both long cuts, and long materials to be cross-cut. I'd have far more depth of throat, etc, and longer blade life. If I went ahead and built it like I want to, I'd be looking for blade in the bulk length- say 100 ft. Obviously, I'd have to settle on a tooth spacing and pattern that would cover all the types of cutting I do.

In my mental plan I'm not yet sure of how I want to do the blade tensioning- I could use the structure of the building to resist this, or I could use a sort of rocking beam which carries one of the wheels. In this case, the frame of the machine would have to be pretty substantial- something I could avoid if I use the floor and ceiling joists as wheel anchor points. So far this is still in thought mode.

This is my answer to the need for more capacity in a bandsaw. I have also considered the other need, which is a more compact machine. There are examples of portable band saws on the market, although none look very stout to me. I have no experience with any of them, so I can't really say whether any of them are any good.

Tony Ennis
12-19-2011, 08:26 PM
My first thought was also a power hacksaw. Compact, blades for different purposes are readily available, and there are a few sizes to choose from.

sasquatch
12-19-2011, 08:38 PM
Holy Crap Darryl,,, A 100ft long blade??!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

NOW that IS A BANDSAW!!:D

Quite an idea though!! I can see your'e a "Thinker".:cool:

johnnyd
12-19-2011, 09:06 PM
How about a vertical stand & table conversion for a portable band saw ?

https://www.google.com/search?q=porta+band+stand&hl=en&prmd=imvns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=D_HvTr7dPMHq0gGN3bS0CQ&sqi=2&ved=0CI0BELAE&biw=751&bih=587

This ought to give you some ideas.

MCS
12-20-2011, 05:50 AM
Made this one in the early eighties from available materials. Welded stainless steel frame, 200 mm Delrin and Nylatron wheels. Copied the sawlength from an existing woodsaw. Had the saws made so that wasn't important.

Ball bearing saw guides and double motorreduction, first timing belt, second gears. The gears should be timing belt too, because of the noise. VFD would also be a nice update.

Result is a slow saw speed to fall in the general range of steel and such.

It eats everything, record is 150mm aluminium and I still have 6 of the 10 original ordered saws.

It can be mounted on a workbench with C-clamps.

http://www.mijnalbum.nl/Foto-GVJJZ3DB-D.jpg

sasquatch
12-20-2011, 09:32 AM
MCS very nice looking bandsaw.


I see no guard cover, has there ever been one on the saw?

MCS
12-20-2011, 11:28 AM
MCS very nice looking bandsaw.


I see no guard cover, has there ever been one on the saw?

Considering the dangerousness of a bandsaw, I didn't think it was needed.

At the factory where I worked, we had a rather large high speed band saw. I remember that one day I thought my hand slipped and touched the saw while sawing.

Instantly I hid my hand behind my back and looked to the ground for red spots. There were none.

A machine is your enemy is the motto, never had a scratch from this one.

daveo
12-20-2011, 02:53 PM
Well not exactly from scratch, one of my buddies was throwing out this small wood saw. It should be a good start! I guess I need to find a motor!

http://www.gatlinggunforum.com/forum/download/file.php?id=586

daveo
12-20-2011, 10:26 PM
I just bought this http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-Industrial-Servo-Sewing-Machine-Motor-3-4HP-/190614571748?pt=BI_Sewing_Machines&hash=item2c61838ae4

Should be good enough to run a saw at slow speeds. Variable speed controller already on it...

lazlo
12-20-2011, 11:09 PM
I just bought this http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-Industrial-Servo-Sewing-Machine-Motor-3-4HP-/190614571748?pt=BI_Sewing_Machines&hash=item2c61838ae4

That's an interesting motor -- have you received it yet? Is the speed range mechanical, and the foot-pedal from the servo control?

Where is it made?

daveo
12-20-2011, 11:31 PM
I just ordered it, the box on the bottom has a on/off, forward/reverse switch and the fine tuning speed controller dial in it. Im sure its probably made in ci*a:D

Forrest Addy
12-21-2011, 12:06 AM
When you scale the saw be sure you can find band stock proportional in thickness to the band wheel diameter. It needs to be about 250 to 1 otherwise you get early fatigue in the band gullets.

So a half-sized saw needs a half thickness band. The usual band for a 4 x 6 saw is made from 0.025" thick saw stock. So you need 0.013 band for the one you propose. I've seen carbon steel band stock intended for light wood contour and jig saw cuts but bi-metal? no.

I searched and the thinnest I could find at the usual sources is 0.025". Your scale may have to compromised or accept premature breakage from gullet fatigue. I'm sure there is some way to balance the variables for a working 2" cap saw.

OTH, maybe a cold saw using 6" milling (slitting) saws. It mught be as aimple as a worm reduces with a modiified outpus shaft mounted on a swing arm.

Wattaya think? Maybe?.

daveo
12-21-2011, 09:20 AM
Lazlo, the guy emailed me. Said they were shipping today and told me that I would have them by Christmas.

Forrest , Mcmaster carr has .014 blades for that saw. No welding required!

daveo
12-21-2011, 11:41 AM
I gutted it last night, got all the parts ordered (I think I need)

http://www.gatlinggunforum.com/forum/download/file.php?id=589

daveo
01-02-2012, 03:47 PM
With the adjusting bolt on the motor and the base off of the saw, everything lines up nice. Ill probably bolt everything to aluminum plate then mount it.http://www.gatlinggunforum.com/forum/download/file.php?id=610

http://www.gatlinggunforum.com/forum/download/file.php?id=611

darryl
01-02-2012, 07:19 PM
100 ft long blade- yeah that would be quite the bandsaw! No, I'm thinking that I'd buy the blade in a roll and it would be able to make 4 to 6 blades. Since I've learned how not to ruin a blade, that could be a ten year supply.