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chriskat
12-26-2011, 12:46 PM
Somebody here will have an idea I'm sure.

My 3 D cell mag lite has all of the batteries corroded in it. Any ideas how to remove them? I've tried impact :-) no luck. Tried a thin metal probe down the side but I can't find anything stiff enough to push in there.

Thoughts? I thought about my lathe but the hole through the head stock isn't big enought for the mag lite to pass.

Thanks,
Jeff

mklotz
12-26-2011, 12:51 PM
There's a good chance that you're SOL but I managed to get one battery out of a Maglite by drilling a small hole into the battery base using a drill extension, then screwing in a lag screw and using a light chain on the lag screw to pull the battery out. Good luck.

Black_Moons
12-26-2011, 01:04 PM
Take both ends off so you can push it out?

If they are carbon zinc batterys, you might consider drilling and screwing em out.. sure would'nt with alkaline though, but then, alkaline usally don't burst. carbon zinc ALWAYS do if you leave the device on (or leave them in it..) after its discharged.

lynnl
12-26-2011, 01:07 PM
Marv is probably right. May just have to toss that one.

But... since it's future looks questionable anyway, I'd think about dumping in a soupy slurry of warm water and baking soda. Let it work and bubble, toil, and trouble for awhile, and see if that will break things free.

Note: conduct that process in some type of container that's impervious to rusting. e.g. plastic tub or bowl.

john b
12-26-2011, 01:16 PM
The solution for the battery corrosion is very simple, call the battery manu. i did this with the exact same flashlight and they sent me a check for the price of a new flashlight. When i called about different flashlight, one that they did not have on their replacement list ( streamlight) i had to send in the flashlight. Three weeks later i got another check. First check only took about a week. Yes the checks were enough to cover the cost of replacement plus tax. Don't get any easier. John b. Chicago burbs

BudB
12-26-2011, 01:56 PM
If I remember correctly MagLite has an agreement with battery manufacturers to repair flashlights at little to no charge. I know I had a switch failure and when they returned the 3C after repairs at N/C it also had a new reflector and lens.

Jim Caudill
12-26-2011, 02:02 PM
I have lost perhaps a half dozen Maglites and Min-Mags due to corrosion. I bought about a dozen of the new LED Maglites this season and gave them out as gifts. What I need to find is, which batteries don't swell and corrode when they go dead. I have tried to disassemble them and salvage them, but I have yet to save one. I try to keep them in vheicles and places, so that I will always have one when I need it. Sometimes they sit for quite a while before they are taken out to use - then thye are shot.

danlb
12-26-2011, 02:18 PM
If the batteries were alkaline, then you use vinegar to neutralize the alkali. It still fizzes just like baking soda with acid. :)

To remove the switch module from the 3D light, you will pull off the switch cover, then use an allen wrench to undo the set screw. See link below. Once the switch is removed you can use whatever you have on hand to press the bad batteries out. Some models (made prior to 2001) have a 'c-ring' inside the tube that may need to be removed.

Reminds me I have a to rotate batteries in my collection again. Yuck. Seems like some always leak. It's not worth leaving batteries in 100 lights, you know?

Dan
Switch removal:
http://www.maglite.com/pdf/CustServ/CD_switch_repair_8_0411222004324362.pdf

macona
12-26-2011, 02:22 PM
If you get maglites that are in two cell multiples you can get lithium primary batteries in various sizes, C and D sizes too. I am not referring to rechargeable batteries, but lithium primary batteries. They are usually a 3 volt cell.

For a standby battery they are nice, 10+ year shelf life and very good cold weather characteristics.

danlb
12-26-2011, 02:30 PM
Macona makes a very good point.

My 'better' lights all use lithium primaries. The CR123A size is smaller and lighter than a C cell but they have more energy and are able to provide that energy at a faster rate than an alkaline cell. I have a pocket sized light that outshines and outlasts and shines further than a 3 D maglite. Yeah, I'm talking big pockets since the light is 4 inches long, the body is 1 inch diameter and the head is more than an inch and a half across. But still, it's amazing.

OTOH... I've swung a 4 C cell Mag at a raccoon who was ripping out my crawl space vents. I made contact as I chased him off and he's never been back. Can't do that with my little powerhouse running on lithiums.

Dan

Black_Moons
12-26-2011, 02:43 PM
I have lost perhaps a half dozen Maglites and Min-Mags due to corrosion. I bought about a dozen of the new LED Maglites this season and gave them out as gifts. What I need to find is, which batteries don't swell and corrode when they go dead. I have tried to disassemble them and salvage them, but I have yet to save one. I try to keep them in vheicles and places, so that I will always have one when I need it. Sometimes they sit for quite a while before they are taken out to use - then thye are shot.

ALKALINE. Seriously, I have never seen an alkaline leak/burst, except when I accidenly recharged one.. mainly because I think its much worse to come into contact with alkaline 'goop' so they are made much better.

Carbon zinc Aka 'heavy duty' seem to ALWAYS leak when the device is left on after full discharge, or its just left in the device long enough... Every time iv seen a battery compartment full of corroded goop, without fail it has been carbon zinc batterys. Never had a problem since I started tossing them out every time I saw em and replacing them with the cheapest alkalines I could find.

MotorradMike
12-26-2011, 02:48 PM
If I remember correctly MagLite has an agreement with battery manufacturers to repair flashlights at little to no charge. I know I had a switch failure and when they returned the 3C after repairs at N/C it also had a new reflector and lens.

They will repair any Maglite but battery leakage voids that offer.

danlb
12-26-2011, 04:20 PM
ALKALINE. Seriously, I have never seen an alkaline leak/burst, except when I accidenly recharged one.. mainly because I think its much worse to come into contact with alkaline 'goop' so they are made much better.




I have a larger than normal number of battery powered devices. I can attest to the fact that alkalines do leak, and they are just as messy as the carbon/acid counterparts. I cleaned up one just this morning. Today they were Duracell AA cells that had an expiration date of 2017. The device had a manual switch so there was no drain as they sat in the device in my drawer.

As I understand it the problem is that the case of the battery is one of the electrodes. As such it needs to be reactive with the paste that it contains and weakens with time. I suspect the mechanical stress of strong spring contacts contribute to the failures.

I've switched as many as possible to lithium primary batteries or Eneloop rechargeable cells. Way fewer problems that way.

Dan

Peter S
12-26-2011, 06:33 PM
If I remember back to my childhood and leaking carbon torch batteries - didn't we soak them in water, perhaps hot water? Not sure! Perhaps this was just to remove the gunge that remained. Water may make the batteries swell even more....
After alkaline batteries arrived I have never gone back...

goose
12-26-2011, 07:39 PM
Maglites, even big ones, are so darn in-expensive now it's not worth the acid/mess to deal with stuck batteries. I've tried,....... sometimes even after getting them out, the internal contacts are so corroded it won't work anyways. For $20 or so, is it worth all the black hands, cursing and mess?

Tyro 001
12-26-2011, 07:45 PM
I had that problem once. My six cell Maglight had corroded batteries about twenty years ago. I was able to repair it by removing both ends. Once you have the reflector off, you have to remove the switch. To do this on the D-cell size flashlights, carefully remove the rubber cap which covers the switch button. It's that cap you press to turn the flashlight on and off. Insert an Allen wrench in the switch button hole and back out the set screw which holds the switch in place. You should be able to drive the batteries and switch out from the bottom end of the flashlight.

Once you have the batteries out, (these are alkaline batteries) neutralize the crud that's left with vinegar and wash the tube out well. Make sure to rinse well, because some detergents can attack aluminum.

Should you ruin the switch, you can get a new one.

Duffy
12-26-2011, 08:56 PM
IF your corroded batteries are Duracell, and IF it is a Maglite, then you will have no problem. I think that, if you check, you will find that Duracell OWNS Maglite, and they seem to stand behind their product(s) very well. They even send the prepaid shipper for the flashlight.

Thruthefence
12-26-2011, 09:29 PM
I wish I'd read danlb's post sooner, I just pitched a 3D cell maglite that's been soaking for a couple of months with no progress. I just figured that the switch element was probably corroded as well.

Bill736
12-26-2011, 09:34 PM
I had the same problem with my 4 "D" cell Maglight . It was quite difficult and time consuming getting the alkaline batteries out, but it became a matter of principle. They came out one little piece at a time. I've taken to coating new batteries with a little vaseline to help them slide out next time. Even so, I notice a tendency now for the batteries to become a bit stuck every few months, so I take out the batteries and clean things up. I think the real problem is that the Maglight bore is a bit too small for the batteries, and some sort of liner should have been used to protect the aluminum bore from corrosion.

danlb
12-26-2011, 11:14 PM
I wish I'd read danlb's post sooner, I just pitched a 3D cell maglite that's been soaking for a couple of months with no progress. I just figured that the switch element was probably corroded as well.


Yeah, that's sad.

If you need flashlight help, the people at CPF are always happy to share tricks, tips and knowledge. Of course, they also share their enthusiasm, and that enthusiasm has been known to be catching.

Dan

mlucek
12-28-2011, 12:31 AM
Yeah, that's sad.

If you need flashlight help, the people at CPF are always happy to share tricks, tips and knowledge. Of course, they also share their enthusiasm, and that enthusiasm has been known to be catching.

Dan

FYI, for those not in the know...

CPF = Candle Power Forums

http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/forum.php

vpt
12-28-2011, 09:14 AM
Take both ends off, load black powder in the cap end of the flashlight. Drill tiny hole in the cap and put cap back on flashlight. Install cannon fuse, light, run.

chriskat
12-29-2011, 09:23 AM
I like vpt's idea but I didn't try it, sadly.

Thanks for all of the replies.

Once I learned how to get the switch assembly out so I could access both ends of the battery stack I drilled straight through the batteries with a 1/2" drill.

The closest to the switch came out easily. The closest to the cap end I was able to collapse the battery case into itself and pull it out. The center one (it's a 3 cell) I got most of out with a screwdriver. The case is well corroded to the inside of the light and I can't get it to move.

Just because it doesn't cost anything to try I'm going to chuck it in the lathe and use a steady rest to support the free end and bore the rest of the battery out with a boring bare. I'll be careful to protect the ways and rest of the lathe from the battery parts.

We'll see and thanks again.

Jeff

chriskat
12-30-2011, 05:37 PM
All fixed, thanks for the help.

Jeff

Black_Moons
12-30-2011, 06:00 PM
Ohhh brutal, I can just picture boring a battery out, weird metals and fluids going everywhere..

And here to think I was afraid of getting abrasives on my lathe!

chriskat
12-30-2011, 07:40 PM
Actually, most of it looked like modeling clay. Certainly no liquid.

Jeff