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aostling
01-04-2012, 11:00 PM
A few days before Christmas I was in Half Moon Bay, and spotted this 1967 AMC Marlin with a For Sale sign on its windshield.

I don't recall seeing one before. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AMC_Marlin describes it, and illustrates some of its luxury features. Anybody ever own one of these?

http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/1967AMCMarlin-1.jpg

wierdscience
01-04-2012, 11:23 PM
No,but it looks like a Lincoln had sex with a Mustang fast back:D

Nice car though,did the sign say what the asking price was?

aostling
01-04-2012, 11:44 PM
Nice car though,did the sign say what the asking price was?

Sorry, I took a photo of the front with the sign, but deleted it in camera. I think it just listed a phone number. To track that down one could contact the owner of the restaurant where it was parked:



Cameron's Restaurant
1410 Cabrillo Hwy S
Half Moon Bay, California 94019
(650) 726-5705

platypus2020
01-05-2012, 12:39 AM
The guy around the corner from me has one, two-tone red and black. Really a Rambler Ambassador with a fast back. His is a six cylinder/automatic.

bob ward
01-05-2012, 05:23 AM
I've not owned one, but have always thought they were a cool looking car.

bobbyjim
01-05-2012, 07:56 AM
I remember seeing them back in the '60's and wasn't impressed. Was stationed at Ft. Meade, Md with a guy who owned one.
But now looking at the photo I have changed my mind. Must be "Old Age"

bewards
01-05-2012, 08:37 AM
It reminds me of the first Plymouth Barracudas. I doubt it is as fast though.



be

gvasale
01-05-2012, 09:05 AM
actually looks much closer to the Dodge 66-67 Charger.

sasquatch
01-05-2012, 09:11 AM
Saw a number of Marlins years ago, there were not many of them around, i didn,t really care for the styling, pretty Unique style for AMC to come out with.
This one must be the V8 as i see dual exhaust there.

AMC were actually pretty good reliable cars, at least some of the models were.

My favourite in the AMC line were the AMX model, with the 390 V8, pretty quick cars, and AMC actually had a factory sponserd High Performance program with over the counter HI-PO parts.

THere still are a number of these AMX cars around with modified engines in Organized Drag Racing that are Super nice very Quick cars.

bruto
01-05-2012, 09:55 AM
I saw a few Marlins back in the day, and they seemed pretty unimpressive. I imagine that they had a fair bit of sap with an AMC v8, but otherwise, just a mid-sized car with an ugly back end. It looked ugly back then, and I can't say I find it much nicer now. It always struck me as badly proportioned, and way too big for its intended task. The AMX and Javelin both seemed like a much nicer package.

On the other hand, of course, now if you have a Marlin you can be pretty sure you're not going to meet a lot of clones on the road. It's definitely distinctive, and I imagine it would make a really good conversation starter. About 95 percent of the people you meet will start off with some variant of "What the **** is that?!?!" and the other 5 percent will take off on a long and tortuous tale of the youthful excesses they accomplished either behind the wheel or behind the front seats.

Mitt Romney's ownership of a new Marlin in high school, and his nostalgic embarrassment about what was at the time a spiffy new car few kids could have afforded, were used by his opponents in the Mass. governor's race to suggest how out of touch he was with the average Joe. Apparently it turned out not to be earthshattering news that a lot of rich kids go into politics, and he survived the scandal of having been exactly what everyone already knew he was: a rich kid who went into politics.

sasquatch
01-05-2012, 10:05 AM
In my opinion one of the "Out of proportion" aspects of the Marlin was the small tires they had, made the body above kinda look overbearing.

Think if i rember,, (And that,s LONG time ago now) :cool: ,,, AMC drivelines were made up of other "Big Three's" components.

Your Old Dog
01-05-2012, 10:25 AM
Their reputation in the 60's was not great. They were up against a lot of sexy cars in those days and everyone was of the belief they were a reworked Nash Rambler and that was a car defiantly on it's way out in the 60's. I suspect many viewed it like they did the Edsel. I'm embarrassed to tell you'all but I really liked the Edsel but then I was only about 12 years old then.

sasquatch
01-05-2012, 10:30 AM
The Marlins Curb Weight was 3282lbs.

The 390 engine was rated at 340 Hp, and 425 Ft Lbs of torque at 3200 Rpm.

With the Factory Hi-Po parts this was increased by quite a bit.

saltmine
01-05-2012, 10:50 AM
I've seen and worked on quite a few of them. And, no, they were not fast.
American Motors went after the 60+ crowd, and their cars were designed with large, easy to operate controls (for arthritic hands) and higher than normal gas mileage. The cars had a slightly "slushy" ride (unless you ordered the police version). Quality control was in it's infancy, back then, and AMC was not a Mercedes Benz by any means. The police version was the only AMC that actually offered for police work. They had adequate performance, but were lacking in the durability department. A lot of police agencies bought them, and were usually out of them before the first year ended...Few, if any, agencies placed a second order.

Contrary to what some have said, AMC didn't use another manufacturer's components in their drivelines. The engine, transmission, and rear axle were exclusively AMC. They did like to use other manufacturer's smaller components, though. Like AC Delco starters and generators. Prestolite distributors, York-Tecumseh A/C compressors, Harrison radiators, and A/C condensers.

The 390 engines had high nickel content block castings, which were nearly impossible to wear out, but if one had to perform any machine work on it, the blocks were tough as owl beaks, and sometimes even carbide tooling was like trying to shave with a dull axe.

Far from being the worst thing that ever happened to AMC was Chrysler Corporation's purchase of the company....Chrysler was after the Jeep line and could care less what happened to the rest of the organization.

bewards
01-05-2012, 12:20 PM
I like the looks. I'd love to own a retro just about anything right now. I miss working on a carburetor and distributor with a dwell angle. The last one I had other than a boat motor was a 1971 MGB. What a pain that thing was!



be

APEowner
01-05-2012, 02:11 PM
Contrary to what some have said, AMC didn't use another manufacturer's components in their drivelines. The engine, transmission, and rear axle were exclusively AMC. They did like to use other manufacturer's smaller components, though. Like AC Delco starters and generators. Prestolite distributors, York-Tecumseh A/C compressors, Harrison radiators, and A/C condensers.

I'm not aware of any engines that AMC used from other brands but I know they used Chrysler TorqueFlite transmissions in allot of their product line. I rebuilt several.

radkins
01-05-2012, 04:24 PM
The myth that AMC used "other" makes of drivelines comes from the 327 and 390 V8s that some people mistakenly assume were Chevy and Ford engines which simply was not true, the AMC 327 was a totally different animal to the Chevy small block as was the 390 AMC V8 vs the Ford 390 V8, the ONLY thing the same for either engine was the (approximate) displacement.

saltmine
01-05-2012, 04:41 PM
Adjusting carburetors and points is a "lost art" anymore. About the time I really got good at them, along came electronic ignition and fuel injection.

But, I still have my ancient Snap-on Dwell/tach just in case we fall into a stone-age Apocalypse after the World ends in December...

On a note about engines....Jeep, which was a division of AMC, used quite a few GM four and six cylinder engines in their smaller units.The 2.5L four-cylinder was a tough little engine, which is more than could be said for the 2.8L, V-6 they used. Working at a GM dealer, we discovered the problem with oil leaks in the 2.8 engines, and with the factory blessing, fixed all of the 2.8L engines we had in our zone. GM eventually issued a tech bulletin outlining the correct repair....(guess who wrote the bulletin?)

Spin Doctor
01-05-2012, 05:54 PM
The largest engine offered in the Marlin in 67 was the 343. Transmissions were Borg Warner's. I always liked the 67's but the 65/66 was butt ugly. In 64 AMC had a show car called the Tarpon. Based off of the American. Why not, Chrysler used the Valiant for the Barracuda while Ford's Mustang is little more than a renodied Falcon. All of the auto companies did parts bin engineering. As far as the AM. V-8's went their biggest single problem was the oil system. Perfectly adequate for normal use for any high output use it had problems maintaining enough flow. This was due to oil pump being in the front cover. All engines from the 2.5L to the 401 used the same gear set in the pump housing. Plus they never had the luxury of special performance heads that the big 3 did. I'd go into more detail but it brings up too many memories. Good and bad seeing as how I worked on the machinery and fixturing in Kenosha for 33 years.

MaxxLagg
01-05-2012, 08:35 PM
I had a 1966 Dodge Charger for years and they were the better looking/proportioned of the two IMO. Strangely enough, at that same time my neighbor had a 66' Marlin with the 327. Both cars were definitely unique in their day and absolutely during the time when I owned mine (97-03). The 66-67 Chargers were Coronets with a different interior, hidden headlights/grille-work and the fastback rear. Mine was a 318 but if you had one of the few 426 Hemi's they built they were silly fast for their day. If the Marlin tickles your fancy and you can afford it buy it! Not real desirable/valuable but you'll never see one passing you going the other way, guarantee it. Other than ones I saw as daily drivers back in the day the neighbor's is the last one I've seen and he sold it in 99.

Optics Curmudgeon
01-05-2012, 09:38 PM
The small New Jersey town I grew up in had two police cars, which were for a short while Ambassadors. Much of the time one or the other was in the shop, and once they were both out of service. AMC supplied a "loaner" police car, an AMX complete with light bar, etc. One of the local cops was a sprint car racer, and was happy to drive it, the rest were less enthusiastic. Catching speeders was less of a problem for a while. The town went back to Plymouths after that.

bruto
01-05-2012, 09:50 PM
Adjusting carburetors and points is a "lost art" anymore. About the time I really got good at them, along came electronic ignition and fuel injection.

But, I still have my ancient Snap-on Dwell/tach just in case we fall into a stone-age Apocalypse after the World ends in December...

On a note about engines....Jeep, which was a division of AMC, used quite a few GM four and six cylinder engines in their smaller units.The 2.5L four-cylinder was a tough little engine, which is more than could be said for the 2.8L, V-6 they used. Working at a GM dealer, we discovered the problem with oil leaks in the 2.8 engines, and with the factory blessing, fixed all of the 2.8L engines we had in our zone. GM eventually issued a tech bulletin outlining the correct repair....(guess who wrote the bulletin?)

Oddly enough, though, while AMC was putting the GM Iron Duke 2.5 into the Eagle, and the GM V6 into the Jeep Cherokee, they were putting their own straight 6 into the Eagle and other products, and a freshly designed AMC 2.5 derived from the old Rambler 6 into the Cherokee. Odd.

Bill736
01-05-2012, 09:54 PM
I saw an AMC Marlin sell at a Mecum auction recently. I was surprised that, as rare as nice ones are, the car did not bring much money. They just don't seem to have developed much of a collector car following yet. But, you never know. Look at what's happened to the value of restored VW vans ( aka bus, transporter, camper, kombi ) ....the price has gone crazy ! A nicely restored 23 window version sold for over $200,000 recently ! It's the " cute" aspect , apparently. I'd rather drive a Marlin !

aostling
01-05-2012, 11:04 PM
Not far from the Marlin in the OP I found these two cars, parked on a side road leading to an ocean beach. A guy was taking a lunchtime snooze in one of them.

They are Subaru Imprezas. These guys have a pretty nifty job, getting to drive on every road on the planet.


http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/GoogleMappingcars.jpg

kendall
01-06-2012, 07:16 AM
I saw an AMC Marlin sell at a Mecum auction recently. I was surprised that, as rare as nice ones are, the car did not bring much money. They just don't seem to have developed much of a collector car following yet. But, you never know. Look at what's happened to the value of restored VW vans ( aka bus, transporter, camper, kombi ) ....the price has gone crazy ! A nicely restored 23 window version sold for over $200,000 recently ! It's the " cute" aspect , apparently. I'd rather drive a Marlin !

AMC was a car you had to own, or you wouldn't appreciate one. My uncle owned a few car lots, and he always said that he hated taking an AMC in trade because the only people who'd buy them were people who had already owned them.

I've always been a fan of the Javelin and AMX, either could run with camaros, mustangs, and chargers without being embarrassed.

AMC was a company that was never afraid to experiment with styling

Spin Doctor
01-06-2012, 11:30 AM
Oddly enough, though, while AMC was putting the GM Iron Duke 2.5 into the Eagle, and the GM V6 into the Jeep Cherokee, they were putting their own straight 6 into the Eagle and other products, and a freshly designed AMC 2.5 derived from the old Rambler 6 into the Cherokee. Odd.

The four cylinder was actually designed at the the same time the 199/232 was in the early sixties*. The machining lines for the blocks (by the mid 70's there were two for the 6 cylinder) were actually built with all of the mounting pads and bored holes for the rest pads and locators needed to run either 4 or 6 cylinder blocks. When the 4 came out for the Jeeps in the early 80s the newer ;ine was converted over and the one major change between the two was that the Cincinatti Broach for the V-8s was installed on the 2.5 line and refixtured. Huge specialized machines that could produce the finished top and bottom surfaces in the block at one pass. The casting would transfer in and the guide rails would lower the piece onto locating pads. Then clamps would come imn hydraulicly in proper sequence to clamp the piece. Once the machine had an indication that the part was clamped (done via air pressure) a hydraulic cylinder would swing the fixture up 90D. At the same time the second fixture wuold swing down and unclamp. To do the cutting a large ram would be moved past the work carrying sets of tools that were mirror images of the surface being cut. While this was happening the piece in the second fixture would be tranfered out and a new piece moved in from the idle station/rollover in between them. This piece would then be clamped. Once the first part was cut the second fixture would swing up as the first came down (the fixtures were linked) satrting the whole cycle over again. At peak production the cycle times were around 120 to 140 an hour. Even using a hoist the guy loading the conveyor at the start of the line had to hustle to keep up.

*OHC versions were also run in the mid to late 60's plus in the late 90's they were also looking at a 24 valve version of the 4.0 and what I think was 3.0L diesel IIRC. Plus a few dimesion notes. The bore spacing on an AMC 4/6 is 4.380. On a small block Chevy 4.375. Crank centerline to deck height and rod lengths fall into the same range between the two. So I really am surprised that no one ever fooled around with a small block derived after market head for them. I do know that there are times that bored out AMC 6's had chevy pistons used in them.

bruto
01-06-2012, 11:38 AM
Spin doctor, that''s interesting, and I'm trying to picture those blocks going through that process.

I seem to recall reading somewhere that the 2.8 in the early Cherokee came about because of time constraints or supply problems, though once again it seems odd that they didn't use one of their existing sixes as a stopgap.

Do you have any insight into why they did not use their own 2.5 in the Eagle? Was it just a matter of manufacturing capacity?

Spin Doctor
01-06-2012, 12:01 PM
About the Iron Duke in the Concord/Eagle versus the 2.5L used in the Jeeps. That is a good question. I think it probably came about becuase the 2.5L was not available when the 4's first started being put in the passenger cars and when it was a decision was made not to switch because of the cost of emissions certification. That is the best idea I can come with. As to the broaches. The whole cycle had a certain sense of ballet to it as a number of things were happening all at once. All of the domestic auto companies used these types of machines for things like blocks, heads and bearing caps. In the late '70s I was working in the block machining department in nthe maintenence area and this is when the companies were all taking as much mass out of their castings as possible to get vehicle weight down. We had engineers from Ford, GM and Chrysler coming through because we were having much better results getting the lieght weight castings to process through the machining lines. Early versions when clamped or machined would simply come apart due to the stresses. Every body eventually got their parts to run they simply had to put some mass back into the parts. When producing something like an automobile engine the designers have to take into account not only the operating stresses but the stresses placed on the parts during the manufacturing process. With the use of aluminum (AL U MIN IUM for you blokes) blocks and heads this is less of a problem as aluminum parts do not lend themselves to these manufacturing techniques. Plus modern milling cutters and inserts can operate at production rates to make such machines obsolete even for cast iron blocks and heads. Add in the use of scintered metals for things such as bearing caps and connecting rods and the whole manufactuing process has changed dramatically.

Rex
01-06-2012, 03:09 PM
I always like those Marlins back then (high school), but never got around to buying one. Styling is a love/hate thing, I thought it was cool.

Anyone remember the Rambler Rebel? the Machine?
Or the SC/Rambler?

That 4.0 AMC straight six as used in the Jeep pickups and other cars was one hot sumbitch. There was a guy autocrossing one back in the 1990s here in Texas. He ran it in the same class as the prepped Camaros and Mustangs and beat them all, often setting FTD - beating even the purpose-built race cars.
Another friend built a AMC Hornet with the 4.0 as a drag car. He regularly humiliated some serious muscle cars with it.

saltmine
01-06-2012, 05:51 PM
We had a brief scramble with Jeep Cherokee's back in the '90's when I worked in the County Fleet Shop. The boss thought they were "cute" and pressured the Sheriff to OK a small fleet of them to use as patrol cars.

As luck would have it, the Sheriff must have had a hangover, that day. And, in no time at all, we found ourselves decalling and installing cages and radio gear in 19 Jeep Cherokees. It wasn't long after they went into service problems started to manifest themselves. The average deputy weighs about 220 lbs. Put a ballistic vest on him, and a gun belt with a portable radio....It wasn't pretty. Fat-assed prisoners usually had to be transported with another vehicle...it was less time consuming to wait for another unit than it was trying to stuff a belligerent drunk in the back of one...And once they got to the jail, it usually took three or four Corrections Officers to drag the guy out. We had one in the shop, once that had both rear doors bent so bad, they wouldn't close. The safety cage was also torn out of the sheetmetal floor.....I'm glad I wasn't there to witness that fiasco.

Running at sustained high speeds usually meant death for the engine or transmission. Sometimes both. And the brakes were right on par with the miniature cooling system...Gad, I hated summer with those Jeeps...look at one wrong, and it overheated, instantly.

On a good note....Chrysler is building them, and selling them in China like hotcakes. Somebody convinced the Chinese they were Suburbans.

Saratoga Bill
01-06-2012, 10:32 PM
OK, I'll throw myself under the bus. I had one of those critters in green. Don't remember how I came to own it but it was during a time that I never kept a car more than 2 months. It was a nice car for road trips, real soft ride but a lot of weight to pull around. If I remember right, I traded it against a Pontiac which I traded on a Corvette, a 67 coupe. Kept the Corvette a couple of years and wish I still had it.

Bill

Dr Stan
01-07-2012, 01:42 AM
Call me weird, I am I know, but I liked the looks of the Marlin and wanted one. However, family needs were more important and ended up with an AMC Hornet wagon. Six banger with a Chrysler auto trans. I never had any problems with it and the engine was virtually a copy of the Chevy six, and in fact may have been one.

Willy
01-07-2012, 02:08 AM
The AMC six cylinder engines where a new clean sheet design brought out in 1964 by AMC. They were in production from 1964 till sometime in the mid 2000s in various cu. in. versions.
Vary reliable engines.

hardtail
01-08-2012, 06:48 PM
Recall reading about the last AMC dealership a few years back, was still there as of 2009.......Collier motors, new cars still on the lot.

http://www.amcrc.com/feature/march2007feature.html

Spin Doctor
01-08-2012, 08:24 PM
The AMC six cylinder engines where a new clean sheet design brought out in 1964 by AMC. They were in production from 1964 till sometime in the mid 2000s in various cu. in. versions.
Vary reliable engines.

As long as you did the scheduled maintence. If you negelcted it like any other vehicle you would have problems. They like any other engine of its era had certain issues. They seemed to eat water pumps*. Not as bad as BMW (we never hear about that) And the early versoins had a shaft on top of the head that the rocker arms were mounted on. Naturally if oil changes were neglected this was at the tail end of the lube system and thats were the sludge would build up first. The rocker arms were either cast or forged and machined in house. In the second half of 73 they switched over to stamped rockers which were done on a Benelli. We had one die maker that practically all he did was work on the draw dies for the roker arms. The press it self was a nightmare to get running right. The problem when they finally solved it was that the ratio between the amount the tranfer bar would move the parts and just just a little too much and the farther down the progressive die the worse it got. Turned out that the transfer bar was driven by a gear that had an internal thread. This gear was driven by a rack attached to the drive train in the crown of the press. This rack also had an adjustment built in so you could adjust the bar relative to its actual motion. IIRC the fix was to decrease the amount of stroke on the ram by about .015". This was done by mounting the shaft with the crank in one of the larger lathes and after the throw was indicated to zero offset the throw so the centine of the shaft was .015" closer to the centerline of the lathe. The throw was then machined and a new split bronze bushing was made to fit the reduced diameter. After the rockers came off of the large press they went to a small peanut cracker that had a rotating table with 6 or 8 stations. The only thing done on the press was to punch the oil hole that got punched into the pocket for the pushrod. The rocker arm was somewhere around .125" thick at that point and the punch was about .050" in diameter. The first time you saw it, it was impressive. Later when you understood what was going on, even more so. In terms of what all was done in one facility I was told at one time that the only auto plat at that time that did more in one place was Ford's Rouge Plant.

*IMO this was due to several factors. The bearings were suceptible to Birnell damage during the pump assembly process either when the Bearing assembly was pushed in or when either the impeller or pulley/pulley mount were pressed on to the shaft. This could happen if the force was tranmitted through the balls and into the inner or outer race depending on if the shaft or our race were pushed against. The other thing that really shortened the life of water pumps IMO was the practice of the backyard mechanic (and some so called mechanics in shops and service garages) to way over tighten the belts. By the time I retired water pump assembly had change drastically. Assembly was done by an automated process and the mounting face was ground after assembly to maitain proper dimensions for the whole serpentine belt layout.

Spin Doctor
01-08-2012, 09:09 PM
I remember when Hot Rod was pushing the "Dare to be Different" theme and one of the project cars featured thatwas under construction was a "65/6 Marlin nicknamed Rumblefish. I wonder if this is the same one

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v19/markandannie/__65_AMC_Marlin_by_Hemi_427.jpg

Machine
01-10-2012, 03:57 PM
Yep, when I was a kid we had a '72 metallic brown Hornet station wagon. It had a 304 V8 and was a pretty good car, never had any out of the ordinary problems with it for cars of that era. One thing I recall is that it was the first car we ever had that had air conditioning. It had a high power setting on it called "desert only." My dad would never engage the desert mode because presumably it would freeze us all out. :D It was as if it was the turbo or afterburner of air conditioning settings or something. haha

Otherwise I had a friend with a yellow '75 Pacer, and aside from its funny appearance it actually was a good car. It had a straight six (258?) and a three on the tree. It ran great, was pretty reliable, got reasonable gas mileage and was a tough car. All fishbowl jokes aside, it had tons of cargo space and you had great visibility out of the car while driving.




Call me weird, I am I know, but I liked the looks of the Marlin and wanted one. However, family needs were more important and ended up with an AMC Hornet wagon. Six banger with a Chrysler auto trans. I never had any problems with it and the engine was virtually a copy of the Chevy six, and in fact may have been one.

sasquatch
01-10-2012, 05:32 PM
SpinDoctor-re: Rumblefish,,


That is one slick looking custom car, just i don't care for the "Lowrider" stance.:cool:

Peter S
01-10-2012, 06:04 PM
Mitt Romney's ownership of a new Marlin in high school


This has been ticking away in my brain.....as a great fan of "Stepdown" Hudsons, I happen to know that a George Romney of Nash was involved with the merger of Hudson and Nash in the 1950's. Could that explain why Mitt Romney was driving a Marlin at school? - Wikipedia says yes, father and son. George Romney became CEO of AMC after the merger, resigning in 1962, apparently a household name in the US due to the sucess of the Rambler. No doubt this is common knowledge to Americans, but might be of minor interest to others....;).

bruto
01-10-2012, 10:19 PM
This has been ticking away in my brain.....as a great fan of "Stepdown" Hudsons, I happen to know that a George Romney of Nash was involved with the merger of Hudson and Nash in the 1950's. Could that explain why Mitt Romney was driving a Marlin at school? - Wikipedia says yes, father and son. George Romney became CEO of AMC after the merger, resigning in 1962, apparently a household name in the US due to the sucess of the Rambler. No doubt this is common knowledge to Americans, but might be of minor interest to others....;).Yes, George went into politics after his resignation from AMC. An interesting fellow. Far from my favorite politician, but he gets mys respect for his civil rights record, and for being a persistent burr in Richard Nixon's saddle.