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aostling
01-05-2012, 12:36 PM
This diving suit is on display at the Santa Barbara Maritime Museum. It has an unpressurized interior, like a submarine, so the diver can be hauled up to the surface without risking the bends. It was built by Oceaneering International, and used ca. 1977 in the oil industry.

The shell is hard magnesium, designed to withstand depths of 2,000 feet. There is a 72-hour supply of oxygen in a tank on the back.

http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/divingsuit-1.jpg

The joints appear to be stainless. The info plaque doesn't say what they used for seals.

Anybody ever go down in one of these?

http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/armjoint.jpg

mochinist
01-05-2012, 02:02 PM
At around 16 I got certified for scuba diving, over the next couple years I got my advanced diving certificate, under water search and rescue certificate and a few others. I did a few zero visibility dives on the lake side of Parker dam here in AZ that were pretty unnerving, but werent as bad as it sounds, no giant catfish ate me lol. Saying all that there is no way I could handle getting in that thing and being lowered anywhere close to 2000', whoever did that had some big cahoneys:p

Black_Moons
01-05-2012, 02:21 PM
Love all the seals on it.. everything is a rotating seal, because if you had any other kinda movement, the displacement of the suit would change as you rotated, And that would basicly mean the water pressure would lock you into the lowest displacement position.

Some of those look like ball joints, Anyone know if ball joints are also used at that depth? Iv only really read about using multiple swivel joints (Idea being like two 45 degree pipes, you can make any angle by altering the rotation between the two)

aostling
01-05-2012, 02:31 PM
whoever did that had some big cahoneys

That's for sure. And he shouldn't be susceptible to claustrophobia, or the trots, because the diver is bolted into the 800-lb suit. I doubt if those mechanical hands could be used to "undress himself."

I drove through Lake Havasu City on New Years Day, then to Parker Dam where you did your diving.

The day before that I noticed that there is almost no snow in the Sierra Nevada – I came over Tioga Pass which was clear and dry. Here is a photo of Tenaya Lake near the 9,945-ft summit. If they don't get snow soon, California is in for a thirsty summer.

http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/TenayaLake-1.jpg

mochinist
01-05-2012, 05:30 PM
Yeah that dont look to good, there is still a lil time though. I went camping right there by Tioga pass at June lake loop back in the late 90's. A buddy and I were there for opening day of trout fishing sometime in April and there was quite the blizzard(for an AZ boy anyways :)), it was the most snow I had ever seen.

mickeyf
01-05-2012, 11:02 PM
designed to withstand depths of 2,000 feet

...doesn't mean anyone actually went down that far in it. It would be interesting to know how far down it has gone though. Don't hear about things like that much nowadays, More unmanned submersibles.

aostling
01-05-2012, 11:20 PM
...doesn't mean anyone actually went down that far in it.

Good point. This article describes the depths actually achieved: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JIM_suit

Spin Doctor
01-06-2012, 12:46 PM
That's for sure. And he shouldn't be susceptible to claustrophobia, or the trots, because the diver is bolted into the 800-lb suit. I doubt if those mechanical hands could be used to "undress himself."



And no beans or cabbage the night before a dive either. :D As an offshoot wasn't NASA looking at a similair suit design a few years back to get away from the problem of the current soft suits having to run at low pressure with pure O2. If the current suits were at the same pressure as the ISS or what the shuttle operated at one could not even bend the arms with out a lot of muscle force. There was one developed in the late '60s by Bill Elkins at AiResearch for the Apollo 18 through 20 missions that were cancled http://www.airspacemag.com/multimedia/videos/A-Space-Suit-Ahead-of-Its-Time.html The video shows a test subject doing things impossible to do in the Apollo suit.

kendall
01-06-2012, 05:07 PM
Wow! that ex-1a is an impressive suit. I'm curious about the decision to drop it in favor of the others.
reliability issues? or was it just that the other suits were 'good enough' that they could design around the issues?

Peter.
01-06-2012, 05:11 PM
Or he didn't bribe the right senator? :)

Black_Moons
01-06-2012, 05:22 PM
Wow! that ex-1a is an impressive suit. I'm curious about the decision to drop it in favor of the others.
reliability issues? or was it just that the other suits were 'good enough' that they could design around the issues?

Im guessing the same thing that happened to lots of 'great ideas' in america.

The origional producer of the suit did'nt give several million dollars to the right congressmen while the apollo suit manufactures did (And then over charged millions more for thier suit, dispite it being the poorer choice)

RetiredFAE
01-06-2012, 06:57 PM
This thing looks just like the JIM Diving Suit used in the James Bond movie
For Your Eyes Only and in a really baaaad sci fi movie called Deep Star Six.

Evan
01-06-2012, 08:20 PM
This is the future of space suits, if space suits have a future. It's called the "Bio-Suit" and relies on mechanical counter pressure instead of inflation. The only part pressurized is the helmet.

http://ixian.ca/pics9/biosuit.jpg

JoeLee
01-06-2012, 08:51 PM
In the early 80's I was trainig for a job in off shore oil. There were some job openings posted for under water welding, that sounded real interesting to me so I took some of the course. Not only did you have to learn a lot about welding but also diving. There was a lot of training both in and out of the class room. The diving part was taught by a navy dive master. The suit in the first post looked similar to the one I saw during training. I think it was called a RAD. It was rated to a depth of about 1200 ft. with out pressurizing it, use beyond that depth required it to be preassurized but I can't remember how much furthur down you could actually go after that. The deeper you went the more the preassure would have to be increased in the suit. Then there was the problem of air mixture, oxygen becomes toxic in deep dives and you would have to decompress, not fun. The bottom line is there really isn't much you can do in that suit anyway, other than risk dying.
At 1200 ft the preassure against the suit is like 535 psi at one mile in depth it's over a ton. Not going to happen. But then there is the fluid breathing system that solves most of the depth problems but no person can endur it's discomforts and I was told at the time it was illegal other than for medical purposes. Interesting topic though.

JL....................

Peter.
01-06-2012, 09:27 PM
I worked wth divers a few times (not SAT or anything, just shallow stuff up to 100 feet), and never did any welding on my job but they had a tool called a Broco, which was a consumable rod in a pistol-grip gun connected to a diesel welder and it had pure oxygen piped down the middle. It burned through 2" bars like they were nothing and used up rods at a fair rate. The divers were telling me that if you didn't ground the Broco to the job properly it could dissolve the alloy fittings on the dive helmet whilst you were working.

JoeLee
01-06-2012, 10:46 PM
Peter, I think it acts like a salt water electrolysis process, proper grounding is a must. Also your work lead or stinger was energized by top side controls when you had the stick in position to weld. You never waived an energized electrode around under water. What your talking about is an under water cutting torch.

JL..............

Spin Doctor
01-07-2012, 08:52 AM
This thing looks just like the JIM Diving Suit used in the James Bond movie
For Your Eyes Only and in a really baaaad sci fi movie called Deep Star Six.

Maybe because there's a sign right next to that has JIM Suit on it? :p

Spin Doctor
01-07-2012, 08:55 AM
This is the future of space suits, if space suits have a future. It's called the "Bio-Suit" and relies on mechanical counter pressure instead of inflation. The only part pressurized is the helmet.



This idea goes back to the '60s too. NASA even got so far as testing them in their big vacuum chamber at JSC in Houston

Black_Moons
01-07-2012, 09:36 AM
This is the future of space suits, if space suits have a future. It's called the "Bio-Suit" and relies on mechanical counter pressure instead of inflation. The only part pressurized is the helmet.


How the ... is that supposed to work? Somehow I picture exposing your ankles to the freezing vacuum of space (or boiling vacuum of space, depending on if your currently in the -100c shade or the +100c sunlight) to be very uncomfertable... Socks would be highly recommended at the least!

But really, what do you mean by 'mechanical counter pressure'? And isent being in a vacuum... Bad? Id assume it would be perticularly difficult to exhail back into your pressurised helmet at the very least, I know from foolishly trying to make PSI gauges move by breath force that I sure as hell don't make even 5 psi.

aostling
01-07-2012, 10:18 AM
Maybe because there's a sign right next to that has JIM Suit on it?

Here is a blow-up of that sign in the OP. I turned it sideways to obviate scrolling, but this may give you a stiff neck.

http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/infoplague.jpg