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Theiskell
01-09-2012, 05:17 PM
Will the twist lock belt work on a bridgeport step pulley head. I have one that is about to need a belt and I have 10 feet of the twist lock on hand. It would be nice if I could use it.

Black_Moons
01-09-2012, 05:50 PM
Of course it will, it will work on anything a normal belt of whatever size twistlink belt you bought will work on.

Theiskell
01-09-2012, 06:13 PM
I know that sounds like a stupid question (ok it is ). For some reason I remember someone on a forum saying it wasn’t a good choice for a milling machine. When I was reading it the explanation given for why not to use one, sounded logical. I just can’t find the post to refresh my memory.

Toolguy
01-09-2012, 08:12 PM
If you've got the belt, try it and see. Much better than some 3rd party opinion. I bet it will do just fine.:)

daved20319
01-09-2012, 09:12 PM
Is that they are directional, and you're not supposed to reverse them. That's the only reason I didn't use them in my lathe, I've got them in several of my wood working tools and have been completely happy with them. Later.

Dave

Rich Carlstedt
01-09-2012, 09:20 PM
Pros---They are quiet and flexable in length. Easy to install and save time. They are great for home shop machines, or custom instalations where belt length is a trial and error procedure. Especially helpful if you need to remove a shaft/spindle to replace the belt


Cons. More expensive
They cannot transmit as much HP as a conventional V belt, and can under some circumstancies stretch a small amount which results in "surging"of the spindle.

Rich

Bill736
01-09-2012, 09:37 PM
In a demanding application, in this case driving the power steering pump and alternator on a tractor, I found that link belts stretch and slip and stretch and slip until they finally fail . I tried three different brand link belts . They do have their limitations.

lakeside53
01-09-2012, 09:48 PM
For those that don't know, you can't change the belt on a BP head without some dissassembly - link belts looked like a winner. Not being able to reverse them was why I didn't go that way on my BPs.

justanengineer
01-09-2012, 09:50 PM
In a demanding application, in this case driving the power steering pump and alternator on a tractor, I found that link belts stretch and slip and stretch and slip until they finally fail . I tried three different brand link belts . They do have their limitations.

That is exactly the reason they are not recommended for automotive applications, though they were developed originally for emergency auto use.

Personally, I wouldnt waste the effort. Standard V-belts are cheaper and last longer.

firbikrhd1
01-09-2012, 09:51 PM
Is that they are directional, and you're not supposed to reverse them. That's the only reason I didn't use them in my lathe, I've got them in several of my wood working tools and have been completely happy with them. Later.

Dave

Some manufacturers link belts are directional but others apparently aren't. The Accu Link Belts by Jason Industrial, sold at Harbor Freight, have no arrows to denote direction and their web site makes no mention of running them in a particular direction. I run mine both directions on my mill without issues.

One exception to Black Moons statement about using them anywhere might be on a machine that uses a combination of V Belt sheaves and Flat sheaves on the same drive. Logan Lathes are one example. The motor pulley is a V Belt and the driven pulley on the counter shaft is flat. The counter shaft uses the flat portion at the bottom of the "V" of the belt to drive it.

Theiskell
01-09-2012, 10:27 PM
Well….It’s on the mill now. Only time will tell. There were no directional arrows on the belt. I think it came from McMaster Carr. Anyway, it seems to work fine in both directions, but I haven’t put it under a load yet either.

Arcane
01-09-2012, 10:40 PM
This is supposed to be the correct direction to install them.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0603/Arcane/Twist%20Lock%20Belt/TwistLockBelt.jpg

Stepside
01-10-2012, 09:10 AM
If your mill has a high and low range the belt will be correct in one range and backwards in the other. On my Bridgeport, you use Forward to get the correct rotation in low range and Reverse in high range. Because it is a 3 phase motor this could be reversed by switching the position of any two wires in the plug, or the wall outlet or where it leaves the phase convertor.

firbikrhd1
01-10-2012, 09:48 AM
This is supposed to be the correct direction to install them.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0603/Arcane/Twist%20Lock%20Belt/TwistLockBelt.jpg


Thank you for the diagram showing proper orientation of the belt. I haven't had any trouble with running it the reverse of that however I will insure that my mill is set up so that the orientation is correct for the rotation I use most.

One good thing about the linked belts is that even if they do have a specific orientation it doesn't take much time to reverse the belt when necessary.

RWO
01-10-2012, 01:40 PM
It's another reason to run a VFD on a step pulley BP. The only time I ever run mine in reverse is to back out a tap or when I put a slitting saw on the arbor upside down.

RWO

Lew Hartswick
01-10-2012, 06:50 PM
or when I put a slitting saw on the arbor upside down.

RWO
That is a useful function. :-)

OH! another is for a left hand milling cutter which I have had a few of.
It caused the instructor a moment of concern when I was going to the
night school back about 16 or 17 years ago.
...lew...

justanengineer
01-10-2012, 07:33 PM
It's another reason to run a VFD on a step pulley BP. The only time I ever run mine in reverse is to back out a tap or when I put a slitting saw on the arbor upside down.

RWO

To me thats rather surprising as I have found quite a few common reasons to run it backwards. Probably the most common for me is removing broken (usually not by me, usually :p ) bolts and studs using left handed drills.

lakeside53
01-10-2012, 11:22 PM
It's another reason to run a VFD on a step pulley BP. The only time I ever run mine in reverse is to back out a tap or when I put a slitting saw on the arbor upside down.

RWO


On BP... If you need to gear down... i.e. low range, you will need to reverse the motor to keep the spindle running clockwise. The vfd only gets you down so far before you run out of torque.

Bill736
01-11-2012, 05:25 PM
That is exactly the reason they are not recommended for automotive applications, though they were developed originally for emergency auto use.

Personally, I wouldnt waste the effort. Standard V-belts are cheaper and last longer.

In retrospect, you're correct . I would rather have used a standard V belt. The reason I tried the link belts was because on this tractor, as on many tractors, there is a hydraulic pump coupled to the crankshaft on the front of the engine. The pump and coupling are very hard to access, and installing a one piece V belt is not possible without disconnecting the pump shaft drive.
I also believe the link belts are more sensitive to contamination and therefore slippage from stray oil and fluids in an engine compartment .