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flylo
01-10-2012, 09:06 PM
This Ebay listing got me thinking why not build my own steady reay for the 17" Leblond. Has anyone done this before? Thanks for any comments & help. Eric

Steve Steven
01-10-2012, 09:26 PM
I built one for my Atlas many years ago. Not too hard, I had a piece of 1 1/4 thick Alum given to me. heres a pict:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v200/Stevesteven/EndViewSdyRst.jpg

Steve

chriskat
01-10-2012, 09:37 PM
Anybody got a picture a home built? My Logan came with a steady rest but I think I may like to have a follow rest some day.

Jeff

j king
01-10-2012, 09:48 PM
made one for mine. I actually made 2.This is the larger.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v24/ikimjing/my%20stuff/jimssteady009.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v24/ikimjing/my%20stuff/jimssteady006.jpg

flylo
01-10-2012, 09:57 PM
WOW! Those are great. I think I see a project coming. Thanks!

beckley23
01-10-2012, 09:57 PM
No reason why you can't build your own steady or follower rest. I have an article in the Nov/Dec 2011 HSM about a couple of FR's I built. Here's one that isn't in the article. Follow rests for Monarch lathes are extremely hard to find, and chances are you won't any like the ones I built, unless you build it yourself.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v152/beckley23/100_0009.jpg
Harry

flylo
01-10-2012, 09:59 PM
Mine did come with a follow rest.

justanengineer
01-10-2012, 10:59 PM
I would recommend looking for an existing steady and modifying the base to fit. From what I have seen larger steadies dont bring much.

Forrest Addy
01-10-2012, 11:10 PM
I've made a few over the years. Trick is to not make them too heavy and to get the base to fit the V-flat correctly. Outside of that it's pretty simple reverse engineering.

And maybe fettle them to match the lathe's appearance and match the paint color - but that's esthetics.

RussZHC
01-10-2012, 11:20 PM
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=47331&highlight=steady+rest

is the thread where Steve posted his...there are more...here is another short thread http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=42054&highlight=steady+rest

the search function gets quite a few results...I have a lot of them already pulled for ideas (so I have some of the text, a lot of the photos but not sure if they are all "here" or from other net sources)

Disagree a bit with the costs of larger rests...I think it depends very much on how large and more often, rests from which machine...the costs I've seen on EBay and Craigs are all over the map and if its big and off the beaten path a bit several hundred dollars is not unheard of...agree though since at the same time if one is patient $50 is not unheard of...

flylo
01-11-2012, 12:20 AM
Your right! Just bought a 16" for $51 on Ebay. I'm glad it's a tad short to give me room to fit it to my lathe & do a few of the mods I saw here, like the bearings. :D Thanks guys!

macona
01-11-2012, 02:34 AM
Your right! Just bought a 16" for $51 on Ebay. I'm glad it's a tad short to give me room to fit it to my lathe & do a few of the mods I saw here, like the bearings. :D Thanks guys!

Bearings do have their disadvantages. The main thing is stuff can get between the bearing and stock and damage the stock. For steel I think bronze still works best, but for aluminum bearing help keep the material from being eaten away.

Tel
01-11-2012, 03:02 AM
Here's three I did for the Myford - the two fixed steadies are rough and ready, and made ot of 'on hand' material, the traveling steady body I cast in ali

http://inlinethumb50.webshots.com/50417/2592443550105506259S500x500Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2592443550105506259SFQyvk)

John Stevenson
01-11-2012, 04:52 AM
I use steady's a lot and found that there is no one design that fits all.

Here's a few I have made over the years.

http://www.stevenson-engineers.co.uk/files/steadypost4.jpg

16" capacity steady to fit the big TOS lathe.

http://www.stevenson-engineers.co.uk/files/steadypost5.jpg

Made of two lots of 4 identical laser cut pieces with selected bits cut off to make the hinges.

http://www.stevenson-engineers.co.uk/files/steadypost7.jpg


Cathead steady for holding square rectangular and welded shafts.


http://www.stevenson-engineers.co.uk/files/steadypost9.jpg

Herbert steady with adaptor piece to fit the small TOS.

Continued..............................

John Stevenson
01-11-2012, 04:52 AM
Second post.

http://www.stevenson-engineers.co.uk/files/steadypost11.jpg


Same steady with loose piece fitted to turn it into a cathead steady..

http://www.stevenson-engineers.co.uk/files/steadypost13.jpg


Large Colchester steady again with conversion piece but with roller followers.

http://www.stevenson-engineers.co.uk/files/steadypost16.jpg

Standard CVA [ 10EE clone ] steady with extra vee machined is so it can be reversed on the bed and allow the fingers to be inboard or outboard.
Sometimes the work will not allow a support diameter to extend thru fare enough to reach the fingers.

http://www.stevenson-engineers.co.uk/files/steadypost17.jpg

Reversing it on the bed allows two bits of the same cherry.

All food for thought.

jackary
01-11-2012, 05:52 AM
I made this one from a short piece of 6" pipe
http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m287/jackary2003/P1020312.jpg
http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m287/jackary2003/P1020309.jpg
Alan

philbur
01-11-2012, 05:54 AM
If you can't find one on ebay or if they command a high price for your particular lathe then buy one the correct size but for another (not popular)machine and modify it. It's a lot less work than building from scratch and probably cost less than the raw material for a scratch built.

I actually bought a new after-market for a 10" Atlas (which was a generic steady with an Atlas adapter) and made a new adapter so it would fit my 10" Boley. 1 hoursí work (well 2 hours for me) and itís done.

It was this one:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-TELESCOPIC-STEADY-REST-ATLAS-10-LATHE-/400262262402?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item5d317d6e82

Phil:)

aboard_epsilon
01-11-2012, 07:42 AM
like john says above ..just find one off another lathe that no one wants

and make an adaptor for it

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v190/aboard_epsilon/smart%20and%20brown/fixedsteady.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v190/aboard_epsilon/smart%20and%20brown/closesteady.jpg

all the best..markj

SGW
01-11-2012, 08:04 AM
Andy Lofquist (Metal Lathe Accessories) sells a casting kit for a steady rest: http://www.statecollegecentral.com/metallathe/MLA-9.html

sasquatch
01-11-2012, 08:18 AM
I have a steady, but just want to thank all those that posted they're homebuilt solutions !!

Lew Hartswick
01-11-2012, 08:36 AM
OK. What is the advantage of four fingers? I can think of a fairly
serious disadvantage, getting all 4 to have the same pressure.
It isn't like 4 jaw chuck where youre trying to move the center
around. ???
...lew...

Tony
01-11-2012, 08:48 AM
Thats some slick work all!
I second Lew's question about 4 fingers.

Also, I really like the simplicity of the type that you bring the fingers
in and tighten.. ie fingers not mounted on feedscrews. I imagine you can
get a lot more pressure on feedscrews.. but thats not how steadies
should be set, no?

Seems like loosening the finger, bringing into contact, and tightening would
be an idiot proof way of not overtightening?

Tony

Jim Shaper
01-11-2012, 09:01 AM
Why wouldn't you indicate and center your work on a steady? Not doing so is just like kicking the tailstock out of alignment and saying "good to go!"

flylo
01-11-2012, 09:06 AM
All great ideas,Thanks! After I fit the one I bought last night I will build one for the 6" Atlas & a larger one for the Leblond useing the pipe method. That looks to work well,I like the reversable jaws & it's within my abilities. Thanks again all! I love this forum, I'm really learning alot. Now into the shop to try out the new VFD.

Mcgyver
01-11-2012, 02:06 PM
Why wouldn't you indicate and center your work on a steady? Not doing so is just like kicking the tailstock out of alignment and saying "good to go!"

not sure what you mean, but when the work is held in the steady and is round, it doesn't matter what position its in, it will still indicate zero.

Harry, that is maybe the neatest travelling steady I've seen - that dovetail allowing adjustment along the Z is brilliant. well done.

While we're posting steadies, here's the most robust one I've seen. Its on my 13x42 DSG. After this pic I made new fingers with bronze pads. I was recently making a crossfeed screw, long and small dia....despite replacing the bearings (torrington) I just found i had to put a little more pressure on than I wanted to get the bearings spinning whereas the bronze pads are can be set against the work with almost not force.

http://i785.photobucket.com/albums/yy132/michael01000/DSC_8348-large.jpg

ak95xj
01-11-2012, 04:11 PM
Mine, its pretty rough (!)..Its for my 7x10 mini lathe

The hex shape is not my idea ,I saw a much larger one made in this style online somewhere.

Reason I went for the hex shape is so I could just weld a couple pieces of square tube, instead of paying for or scavenging a large circle of metal..

Made it before I got a mill hence the angle iron weldment on the bottom..

The studs are chromoly 3/8 24 axles from a bicycle

Its a piece of junk I quickly threw together but it seems to work fine..I like the brass contacts ,put a little grease on them and they slide very smooth

http://i205.photobucket.com/albums/bb284/ak4130/Picture014-1.jpg

justanengineer
01-11-2012, 04:51 PM
Why wouldn't you indicate and center your work on a steady? Not doing so is just like kicking the tailstock out of alignment and saying "good to go!"

Because there is no need to. Typically, you use said tailstock to do a large portion of the turning, then insert the steady to do other work before the tailstock is removed, which is why steadies hinge open.

In many cases as well, the feedscrews on steady rests arent fine enough to act well as adjustment screws. You would likely be just as close simply eyeballing it. IMHO this is why most steadies only have three fingers.

Jim Shaper
01-11-2012, 05:10 PM
My main reason for steady use is to turn things that can't be easily fit to the tailstock. I dial them in every time.

That it's round doesn't mean a damn thing, when I indicate it, it's to ensure it's centered with the chuck. If it's not, you'll cut a taper.

Mcgyver
01-11-2012, 08:02 PM
My main reason for steady use is to turn things that can't be easily fit to the tailstock. I dial them in every time.

That it's round doesn't mean a damn thing, when I indicate it, it's to ensure it's centered with the chuck. If it's not, you'll cut a taper.

...last time you said you indicate it in the steady, what else am I supposed to think :confused: I'm not saying you don't know what you're doing only that you are not explaining it such that its clear what you mean

Oldbrock
01-11-2012, 10:22 PM
My 10K came without one so I built this. Peter

http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj232/brockley1_bucket/CIMG0539-1.jpg

http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj232/brockley1_bucket/CIMG0538-1.jpg

jackary
01-12-2012, 06:46 AM
I think you could have as many legs on a steady as you desire. I find no problem with four, in fact it has advantages because you can bring the lower two into contact and lock them in position then push the top two into contact without disturbing the setting, it works for me anyway. You can also slide the top two away if you want to remove the component for measuring etc and replace it without losing position.
Alan

Jim Shaper
01-12-2012, 02:38 PM
...last time you said you indicate it in the steady, what else am I supposed to think :confused: I'm not saying you don't know what you're doing only that you are not explaining it such that its clear what you mean

Indicating in the steady is exactly what I meant. Not sure how there's confusion there?

My steady gets used when something's too big to fit my spindle bore and I need to do end work on it. Not having the end centered (which you need to indicate to find) is completely unacceptable. Now if you don't know how to sweep an indicator on a steady to find anything but a single measurement, you're doing it wrong. ;)

When you sweep the front and top faces of your work, the part is centered when there's no more taper along it's length (as long as the part itself isn't tapered - since many barrels are). The other way is to sweep the bore of the barrel from the end (measuring the bottom of the rifling lands), but that requires a rotating indicator holder from either the tool post or tailstock. Spinning the part and measuring a fixed location to the bed will always indicate that locations distance from the work, and nothing more.

Mcgyver
01-12-2012, 04:35 PM
we're on the same page, I mistook your first post as meanng indicating the end in the steady which of course wouldn't do anyting...I get indicating in two planes along the Z axis is how to do it :)