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dalee100
01-10-2012, 11:07 PM
Hi,

I've been looking for plans or exploded views of boring heads. All I can seem to find are photos of the finished tools. I really would like to see some internal parts for ideas in designing my head.

Anybody got plans or phots of a 2" shop made head?

Thanks,
dalee

hardtail
01-10-2012, 11:26 PM
I thought Darryl had a thread about one he'd made in the past week?

Just bought a UPA2 Wohlhaupter, might be pursuaded to part with it?

kd4gij
01-10-2012, 11:43 PM
Here you go. You may have to join to download them but it ia free

http://www.projectsinmetal.com/free-metalworking-project-plans-adjustable-boring-head-mill/

b2u44
01-11-2012, 01:02 AM
http://homepage3.nifty.com/amigos/boring_head/boring_head-e.htm

Edit: Drawings are available by following the link at the top of the page.

darryl
01-11-2012, 02:39 AM
I haven't posted anything lately about my homemade boring tools, but I have made a few. The most interesting of these (to me anyway) is the adjustable-on-the-fly one. I rarely build anything from plans, so as a result there are no plans that I could post. There should be some pics on-line still showing a few views of it. It might be tricky to build just from the pics, but maybe you could get some ideas anyway. Here are a few images. The first one shows the worm gear and the wheel it drives which is attached to the leadscrew. The leadscrew moves the dovetailed piece back and forth, and that's what carries the cutting tool.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v136/heinrich/boringhead4.jpg

The next pic shows it assembled, and you can more easily see the plastic toothed wheel which turns the worm. As the spindle is turning, a finger can be brought up against the wheel and it will rotate a bit each time it comes around and hits your finger.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v136/heinrich/boringhead3.jpg

The last pic shows the side which mounts to my mill spindle. The recess is a very snug fit to the protruding part of the spindle, and it's pulled on with a drawbar. I find this to be more rigid than mounting the boring head to an mt3 arbor. The cutting tool can be arranged in any number of ways, and can work with the spindle rotating in reverse as well. This way I can choose to advance the cutting tool outwards from center, or bring it in towards center. There is an adjustable stop to set the limit point.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v136/heinrich/boringhead2.jpg

The toolholder block could be changed to anything that suits, as long as it has mounting holes to fit the tapped holes. I used button head bolts to assemble the dovetailed body pieces, but if I had countersunk the holes (which I still can) there would be more room for adapting some other tool holder.

.RC.
01-11-2012, 03:07 AM
There is the MSC kit one..

http://www.sc-c.com/metallathe/MLA-7.html

rowbare
01-11-2012, 12:01 PM
Mr Ishimura built one (item 47) : http://homepage3.nifty.com/amigos/index-e.html

bob

dalee100
01-11-2012, 06:05 PM
Hi,

Thanks for the links! I have some good ideas to bounce around with now.

Darryl, your automatic head is very interesting, I like it. I may try my hand at an automatic some day.

dalee

loose nut
01-11-2012, 08:52 PM
I built one that was printed in HSM mag. about 1984, basic but solid and works very well. All you have to do is find a copy of the right magazine.

v860rich
01-11-2012, 11:54 PM
I built one of the Ishimura heads with US threads.
I looked for the plans but haven't located them.

THANX RICH

People say I'm getting crankier as I get older. That's not it. I just find I enjoy annoying people a lot more now. Especially younger people!!!

Mcgyver
01-12-2012, 08:55 AM
! I have some good ideas to bounce around with now.


The one thing I think is a major design flaw in the simple offshore ones is the tiny little graduated wheel. If you made this an inch dia or even larger you could do much more accurate work with these tools.....Their limit of accuracy would seem be nothing more than the terrible resolution of the graduated dial!

Boucher
01-12-2012, 09:20 AM
Another problem reported with the imports is that the thread pitch is corse and coupled with the afore mentioned index wheel they are hard to adjust accurately.

ammcoman2
01-12-2012, 09:35 AM
Many years ago I built the small boring head to the George Thomas design from plans supplied by GuyLautard.

You can also get the plans from Hemingway:
http://www.hemingwaykits.com/acatalog/Boring_Heads.html

Or get the book Model Engineers Workshop Manual by George Thomas.

The one I built is fairly small (takes 3/8" toolbits) but it does have a 40tpi thread on the adjuster which give 0.001" on diameter with the 50 divisions on the dial. At the time I didn't have the equipment (or knowhow) to do the divisions on an angle so I purchased the dial for the Sherline boring head as a spare part from Sherline.

I can screw it into the Taig mill's spindle or put an MT arbor on it to use in the lathe.

Geoff

photomankc
01-12-2012, 10:00 AM
http://homepage3.nifty.com/amigos/boring_head/boring_head-e.htm

Edit: Drawings are available by following the link at the top of the page.

That one is a work of art!

Mcgyver
01-12-2012, 10:47 AM
That one is a work of art!

He did do a nice job. Fine pitch on the screw, as Boucher suggests, addresses the resolution issue i have.

A question on this unit. To effectively use my cheapo offsore (haha, stet on the freudian typo) boring head, I very carefully slightly loosen and then snug again the set screws against the gib with each adjustment. This is the only way to get reliable results I find. The design presented in the link has lock nuts on set screws suggesting that one sets the gib and leaves it put. I think you'd need an incredibly accurate fit to get away with not tightening them for use....or have I just been conditioned by the cheapos and most of the good ones are made that way?

willmac
01-12-2012, 11:19 AM
Mcgyver-

You are definitely not alone in needing to use this procedure. My Chinese?? boring head suffers from inconsistent fit/finish on the gib, which leads to a degree of stick/slip. With the leadscrew being a bit coarse, that can lead to an unexpectedly large cut. I do the same as you, slacken all screws, adjust, then re-tighten. This gives consistent cuts.

I have been looking out for a nice automatic boring head at a price I can afford for a long time now.

WaveDude
01-12-2012, 12:49 PM
Would love a set of plans for an Automatic boring head.

Mcgyver
01-12-2012, 01:09 PM
I have been looking out for a nice automatic boring head at a price I can afford for a long time now.

when you say automatic, as in a Narex that does facing, tapers etc? I picked up two Narex's recently, haven't used them yet, I may not be smart enough :eek: . More to them than the offsore.

Where does the real value of those features come in - why do you really like them over the more simple style? Being new to them I just don't know how much they'd get used other than straight forward boring, but that may because their full value hasn't dawned on me

Since we're still discussing features hopefully its not pulling thread to far away from the topic

TGTool
01-12-2012, 01:48 PM
A small taper ability would be really ace for doing clearance in die blocks. Holes need to have clearance starting part way down the hole so slugs don't stack up, jam, and split the block.

If you find you've got more Narex than you know what to do with, keep me in mind. :)

willmac
01-12-2012, 01:49 PM
Yes, automatic as in Narex, Wolhaupter, Kaiser etc. I think Wolhaupter is probably the most common over here.

There are two main reasons why I would like one:

1) The quality of design and manufacture is in a totally different class to the typical Chinese boring head. This manifests itself in smoothness of operation, rigidity, real precision and far more certainty about the the result you can get.

2) The ability to carry out some operations that whilst not impossible for a plain boring head are tricky. Examples are facing, including back facing the opposite end of a hole, cutting grooves to a precise depth with automatic knock of of feed. I could definitely use these capabilities. There are other possibilities such as taper turning, but I am dubious whether I would choose to use this capability.

The only problem with heads like this is that they are expensive for home shop use, at least on UK Ebay.

If you would like to see what can be done with a digital boring head, have a look at the Wolhaupter Digibore. I won't be getting one of those for a while.

Bill

Arthur.Marks
01-12-2012, 02:49 PM
I believe it was already mentioned in this thread, but the Metal Lathe (MLA) head is in fact automatic: http://www.sc-c.com/metallathe/MLA-7.html It IS a little large (4"-diameter) for some machines (mine!). I might build it someday regardless :) It looks like it could make a nice piece of tooling.

uncle pete
01-12-2012, 03:49 PM
If I was going to build a boring head from scratch and build it without an integral shank? I wouldn't hesitate to use what Narex does as a shank / tool head interface. It's a barely slip fit short and wide boss of metal that centrally locates the head to the shank, And then 4 allen head cap screws thru a larger ring of metal on the shank that thread into the head to lock the two togeather. This works especialy well if your mill has reverse and your wanting to use that cross hole with a standard boring bar for large holes. More expensive in materials to build a shank that way, But a far superior system than the threaded type that Criterion uses, and that I'm sure all of the imports are copied from.

Brand new Narex hardened and ground shanks were running $150-$200 just for standard tapers. So more than a bit pricey for a home built head. I think their pricey to fit the Narex heads. I'd think there must be some online dimensions around for the Narex shanks Just to get a rough idea of how their designed and what they look like. I haven't used my Narex B/F head yet, But I know exactly what Mcgyver's talking about, And being smart enough? These heads are a bit intimidating just reading thru the manual. One mistake that results in a crash is going to cost more than a few bucks.

Pete

RWO
01-12-2012, 04:17 PM
I built the Metal Lathes Acess. head many years ago. The castings were top quality and easy to machine. The slide does automatically move when you stop the knurled ring from rotating with the head. You could scrape in the dovetail as a project, but I just machined it closely and used lapping compound to smooth up the fit. I have never felt the need for a better head, but I admit I have never used a Wolhaupter or anything like that.

RWO

Arthur.Marks
01-12-2012, 04:41 PM
Glad to see a post from someone that made the MLA. Was the gearing & clutch straightforward to make or a fairly advanced project? I completely agree regarding the threaded shank connection. Why Criterion only offers their automatic/facing head with such is a mystery to me. If I were to make the MLA kit I would likely devise a set screw, taper pin or some other means to securely lock the connection.

As a side note, I was looking through back issues of HSM. A few issues ago, there was an article on modifying a standard boring head with a pin-wheel like gear attached to the advancement screw. It effectively turned it into a facing head. Very DIY design, but I thought I would mention it.

gzig5
01-12-2012, 10:08 PM
A small taper ability would be really ace for doing clearance in die blocks. Holes need to have clearance starting part way down the hole so slugs don't stack up, jam, and split the block.

If you find you've got more Narex than you know what to do with, keep me in mind. :)

A Tree boring head will do a taper. I'm not sure if any of the others mentioned will. Be prepared to pay though. Most I've seen have gone for $400-600 depending on how complete the set is.

I found an ugly but still tight Chandler automatic on ebay for $75. Seller had poor description and nobody knew what it was. Not as spiffy as a Narex or Wolhaupter, but does the facing and grooving I've wanted to do so far. Keep an eye out for the lesser known brands.

hardtail
01-13-2012, 10:45 AM
Other brands will do a taper but the Tree head has some additional features and versatility that the others don't.......

RWO
01-13-2012, 01:26 PM
The MLA head uses a star wheel on the lead screw that is engaged by a pin on the inside of the knurled sleeve. I forget exactly how much the lead screw advances per click, but it is less than .005".

RWO

rustygreen
01-19-2012, 08:25 AM
Hi there,

I took the Ishimura one in post #7 as my starting point/inspiration and built this one for my Linley jig-borer. It fits the taper directly and works a treat! The first time I'd cut dovetails on my shaper.

http://i1144.photobucket.com/albums/o486/rspoering/IMG_5861.jpg

http://i1144.photobucket.com/albums/o486/rspoering/IMG_5863.jpg

Tony
01-19-2012, 09:17 AM
now thats a beaut'

nice work.
Tony

George Barnes
01-19-2012, 11:43 AM
This is a boring and facing head that I built from a casting and plans set that came from a HSM advertiser that I think no longer exists. The adaption to a Bridgeport is my cobble job. Works pretty well but doesn't get much use. I built it for one project and it mostly collects dust. But I've got it if needed. LOL.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v707/gbarnes/BoringFacingHead-1.jpg

The one that gets the most use in my shop is one that I built from an article and plan set out of a very early issue of this very magazine. WOW, has it been almost 30 years since I did that? November/December of 1982.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v707/gbarnes/BoringHead.jpg

elf
01-19-2012, 12:27 PM
He did do a nice job. Fine pitch on the screw, as Boucher suggests, addresses the resolution issue i have.

A question on this unit. To effectively use my cheapo offsore (haha, stet on the freudian typo) boring head, I very carefully slightly loosen and then snug again the set screws against the gib with each adjustment. This is the only way to get reliable results I find. The design presented in the link has lock nuts on set screws suggesting that one sets the gib and leaves it put. I think you'd need an incredibly accurate fit to get away with not tightening them for use....or have I just been conditioned by the cheapos and most of the good ones are made that way?

Would adding a Vernier scale help with the resolution?

JCHannum
01-19-2012, 01:57 PM
I built the MLA boring head a couple of years ago, as I was intrigued by it. It was not a difficult build for anyone who has a bit of experience building from castings. The workings are not difficult, and the instructions, as with all of Andy Loftquist's are well written and easy to follow.

I have also built the boring head that Guy Lautard adapted from, I believe, George Thomas's plans.

As far as the adjusting, my most used boring head is a Criterion. I just snug the gib screws and adjust without loosening. The markings on the adjustment dial are dead on, and repeatable. I previously had a chicom knockoff, and could never get the accuracy I can achieve with the Criterion regardless of what method I used.

uncle pete
01-19-2012, 02:16 PM
According to Criterions directions, The set screws at each end of the slide are adjusted to give a no slop fit yet still allow smooth travel. After moving the slide for the next cut only the center set screw is used to lock the slide in place. The outer two set screws are only moved during the rare times the gib needs adjusting for wear. For the average HSM type that might be never. That's how I do it and it works for me.

Pete

Tony
01-19-2012, 03:11 PM
Not to sidetrack, but what does everyone think of the "pivot" style boring
heads. I've never used one (or seen one first hand), but I'd guess the pivot
could be prone to moving without notice.

Here's an image from Chronos:
http://www.chronos.ltd.uk/acatalog/info_171115.html

glorified flycutter?

dalee100
01-19-2012, 05:34 PM
Hi,

I haven't ever used anything like that head. Just going by the photo, I would have to say I wouldn't be impressed enough to buy it. I could see that piviot moving very easily and un-noticed.

dalee

lane
01-19-2012, 06:19 PM
Here is a little one I made for my Mini Mill
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w277/lane5263/MiniBoringHead001.jpg

http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w277/lane5263/MiniBoringHead002.jpg
And it`s big brother.
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w277/lane5263/Shopmadetools005jpg.jpg

jackary
01-20-2012, 06:17 AM
This is mine
http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m287/jackary2003/th_Photo9.jpg (http://s107.photobucket.com/albums/m287/jackary2003/?action=view&current=Photo9.jpg)
http://i107.photobucket.com/albums/m287/jackary2003/th_Photo10.jpg (http://s107.photobucket.com/albums/m287/jackary2003/?action=view&current=Photo10.jpg)

Alan

dian
01-20-2012, 07:23 AM
what does the in/out lever do? is that some kind of in the air tailsock?

TGTool
01-20-2012, 08:49 AM
what does the in/out lever do? is that some kind of in the air tailsock?

If you haven't followed the story of Alan's lathe it's a true wonder and a work of art. I believe there's a thread on this forum somewhere and articles in Model Engineers' Workshop.

JCHannum
01-20-2012, 09:19 AM
what does the in/out lever do? is that some kind of in the air tailsock?

That is the outboard end of the headstock. I would suspect that it controls the feed of the head when in the facing mode.

Agreed that Alan's machine (it is much more than just a lathe) is a work of art.

jackary
01-20-2012, 06:00 PM
what does the in/out lever do? is that some kind of in the air tailsock?

Dian,
I made this boring head a long time ago (1986), it works by a stationary cam inside the lathe spindle. The cam operates a lever and ratchet system to increment a gearwheel on the screw thread on the boring head in one tooth increments for each revolution. The control lever at the other end of the spindle moves the cam forward or backward to enable the cutting tool to move outwards or inwards, the mid position disengages the cam to stop it moving the cutting tool and also for manual only operation when the head is stationary. Hope this is sufficient explanation.
Alan

lynnl
01-20-2012, 07:17 PM
Does anyone know the author for that boring head shown by George Barnes, in the NOV/DEC 1982 issue of HSM? (Post #30, second picture)

And... if it is included in any of the Village Press hardback books?

lynnl
01-21-2012, 08:26 PM
Does anyone know the author for that boring head shown by George Barnes, in the NOV/DEC 1982 issue of HSM? (Post #30, second picture)

And... if it is included in any of the Village Press hardback books?

Bump, bump, bump...

Just in case someone who'd already abandoned this thread might could answer those questions.

George Barnes
01-21-2012, 10:58 PM
W.C. Grosjean was the author and it was included in the first book "Projects One". Page 158

lynnl
01-21-2012, 11:39 PM
Ah, Thank you George!

I have several of the 'Projects' books, hopefully that one's among them.

I like the looks of the one you made.

Lynn

Nemesis
02-28-2012, 12:49 PM
A very nice Boring and Facing head appears on the March/April 2012 edition of the HSM, it is a home made device that has two rates of feed in two directions and will bore or face in standard form up to 110mm diameter.

Nemesis

TGTool
02-28-2012, 01:34 PM
A very nice Boring and Facing head appears on the March/April 2012 edition of the HSM, it is a home made device that has two rates of feed in two directions and will bore or face in standard form up to 110mm diameter.

Nemesis


A boring head? I would be interested and couldn't believe I'd missed it so pulled out the issue again and looked through and I still can't find it. There's a nice one on the cover being used for the slotting attachment article. Could you give me more specifics on the boring head please?

Nemesis
02-29-2012, 02:00 PM
The Boring and Facing Head was designed by Graham Meek the author of the Slotting attachment article. There is an article starting in Engineering in Miniature on this very Boring Head in the April edition, I understand that it is also available in a book from TEE Publishing by the same author.

Nemesis

TGTool
02-29-2012, 02:51 PM
Ah, now that does look interesting. It's a very nice looking boring head on the cover. I see the book is "Projects for Your Workshop Vol. 1" for 13.95 GBP. I might spring for that. http://www.teepublishing.co.uk/books/in-your-workshop/projects-for-your-workshop/

Nemesis
02-29-2012, 04:01 PM
I do not think you will be disappointed with the contents as there are plenty of projects to choose from, I see on other forums that the book has been well received and the author has been compared to the late George H Thomas, who I understand was a personal friend of Graham Meek.

Nemesis

uncle pete
02-29-2012, 05:47 PM
If Graham Meek can be even somewhat compared to George Thomas, I'll buy it without hesitation. Our own Mcyver on this forum would be another I'd say the same about. His cut knurling tool artical reminded me very much of Mr. Thomas's writings and attention to detail.

Pete

oldtiffie
02-29-2012, 07:34 PM
The one thing I think is a major design flaw in the simple offshore ones is the tiny little graduated wheel. If you made this an inch dia or even larger you could do much more accurate work with these tools.....Their limit of accuracy would seem be nothing more than the terrible resolution of the graduated dial!


Another problem reported with the imports is that the thread pitch is corse and coupled with the afore mentioned index wheel they are hard to adjust accurately.

Maybe I am lucky (I wish!!). I have a 3" and a 2" boring heads that are both new and Chinese.

They are as smooth as silk.

The lead-screw pitch is 1mm, the graduations at 0.01mm (0.0004") intervals and are very clear. The slide movement and gib adjustments are excellent as well. I just barely "nip" the centre gib screw and it works just fine.

I have had a 0.01mm (0.0004") indicator on the slide and have checked the screw calibration - right on as regards disatance and repeatabiliy.

I have the usual 3MT taper/adaptor for my HF-45 and Sieg SX3 and X3 mills. A very good combination.

https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/M192

https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/M182A

https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/M183

Nemesis
03-01-2012, 04:35 PM
You do not have to take my word as to Graham Meek being the next George Thomas, if you read the entry by "Niloch" on the Model Engineer Forum at the following link, you can see for yourselves

http://www.model-engineer.co.uk/forums/postings.asp?th=54226&p=2,

His Screwcutting clutches for the Myford Super 7 (its in the book), Seig C3 and currently Warco BH600 plus the Warco(Grizzly) Mini lathes are a credit to him

Nemesis