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LHC
01-21-2012, 06:53 PM
Look what I got ! It's a charming old British Raglan 5 lathe that I rescued from the back room of a local research outfit who bought it new in the 60s as best I can determine. Not shown, but I do have the splash guard (had to take it off to strap it down to the trailer for lugging home). Also, I have a 3 jaw chuck and the 4 jaw.

http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn286/LHC_02/Raglan%20Lathe/P1020348a.jpg

http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn286/LHC_02/Raglan%20Lathe/P1020349a.jpg

I donít have a tool post or spanner wrench for the L-00 spindle.

And speaking of the toolpost - how does one remove the topslide on this so that I can clean it up? It's very hard to move. Mess of rust on it as well as you can see in the picture.

I know very little about lathes other than what I have read, so this is going to be a bit of a learning curve for me. I expect I'll be firing up lots of questions pretty soon...

I've joined the yahoo Raglan group but it's a little quiet over there compared to here, so I figured I'd proclaim (...maybe gloat a bit) about my new acquistion here too.


Thanks for looking.

sasquatch
01-21-2012, 06:56 PM
Can't help you with your'e questions,, but the lathe looks quite good!!

Pictures sure make a difference!!

jdunmyer
01-21-2012, 07:05 PM
In removing the top slide, I'd begin by backing off the gib adjusting screws. Loosen the jam nut, then loosen the gib screws a couple or 3 turns. I'm pretty sure you crank the top slide towards you to remove it. Just keep cranking.

Get it loose first, so you don't strip the nut. You might have to tap the top slide with a mallet while turning the handle. Spray a bunch of your favorite penetrating oil in/on the thing before starting.

LHC
01-21-2012, 07:16 PM
In removing the top slide, I'd begin by backing off the gib adjusting screws. Loosen the jam nut, then loosen the gib screws a couple or 3 turns. I'm pretty sure you crank the top slide towards you to remove it. Just keep cranking.

Get it loose first, so you don't strip the nut. You might have to tap the top slide with a mallet while turning the handle. Spray a bunch of your favorite penetrating oil in/on the thing before starting.

Thanks for the advice. I've done what you suggested - backed off the gib screws (no need to worry about locknuts on two of them seeing as they are not there !). It moved a bit more easily, then I poked a bit of oil on the partially exposed way. Moved it back and forth and then tried backing it all the way out (towards you in the picture). But it seems to hit a stop of some sort. Can't see anything obvious at the moment.

Any other ideas?

RussZHC
01-21-2012, 07:35 PM
Nice, both here and a pretty good little bit here

http://www.lathes.co.uk/raglan/index.html

3/4 of the way down, if you had not already found it; same website has manuals etc. available

Guessing, try it the other way (away from operator)...assuming the slide has a "U" cut out (when viewed from the top) could be the nut hitting up against the bottom of that "U"...not sure though

cadwiz
01-21-2012, 07:39 PM
I saw a post somewhere that suggested Raglan manuals are available for download through the yahoo group. Have you retrieved a copy of said manual? There's probably reference diagrams that should provide insight to disassembly. Also, I'd suggest checking out the Raglan section at www.lathes.co.uk, there's a good bit of background info there.

Good luck and have fun
Cadwiz

SGW
01-21-2012, 07:51 PM
Almost certainly, crank to move the cross slide away from you, toward the back of the lathe. It should eventually run off the end of the leadscrew, at which point you should be able to slide it off the rest of the dovetail by hand...IF, as somebody else pointed out, the cross slide nut doesn't hit anything.

It looks like a nice lathe that had quite a bit of non-abusive use when first bought, but has sat idle for an extended period. It looks like a prime candidate for resurrection.

LHC
01-21-2012, 08:07 PM
I think it's something to do with the nut hitting the end of the cutout underneath the topslide.

I have the manual d/l but it doesn't show any exploded views etc.

Perhaps I have to take out the allen head screws holding the end plate and crank assy, crank the screw out of the nut toward the operator in the pic, then slide the topslide off in the other direction (toward the spindle) sans crank and endplate?

This thing is out in my unheated garage and the temps are dropping like a stone at the moment - will check it again tomorrow morning.

Thanks for the help !

Hey SGW - whereabouts are you in Maine?

wierdscience
01-21-2012, 09:05 PM
That is what I would suggest,removing those screws and bumping the top back with a block of wood and a hammer.Should be able to slide the top off and expose the screw at that point.

Nice Lathe BTW,sure is well built for it's size.

Toxic
01-21-2012, 11:24 PM
Nice Find..Where did you find it? I am from NB too.. Your lathe has a few characteristics similar to my Cholchester but the Compound slide is a bit different then mine. If you look up TubalCain on Utube you can watch a video on how to take it apart and clean it..He takes one apart that is very similar to yours with the allen screws in the front.

willmac
01-22-2012, 07:37 AM
I believe John Stevenson used to work at Raglan. If you send him a message to alert him I think he could give you chapter and verse on this lathe.

John Stevenson
01-22-2012, 09:45 AM
Lewis,
Can't give an exact answer as it was a long time ago but seeing as it has the deep slot for the toolpost bolt I'd say that you need to release the screw plate and wind the screw out then push the slide off towards the chuck.

I think I may have a manual for this but suspect it's the same as the one on the Yahoo site, I'll check later.

LHC
01-22-2012, 10:06 AM
Lewis,
Can't give an exact answer as it was a long time ago but seeing as it has the deep slot for the toolpost bolt I'd say that you need to release the screw plate and wind the screw out then push the slide off towards the chuck.

I think I may have a manual for this but suspect it's the same as the one on the Yahoo site, I'll check later.

Thanks very much John. When the temps warm up later today I'll venture out to the garage and see if that works. It does move fairly smoothly back and forth now that the oil has worked its way into the slide. A bit of resistance at one point around the clock with the crank, but far better than it was. I suspect it's been 10-20 years since this thing has seen any oil at all.

If your manual is the same as the one on the yahoo site, no need as I have that already.

I wouldn't mind some sort of guideline on oiling/greasing things if you have something like that kicking around. No rush.

Thanks for your help,
Lewis

J Tiers
01-22-2012, 10:51 AM
That looks like quite a nice machine.... Did you get chucks etc with it?

Agree that the plate with crank must come off and the rest slides off other end. Loosen the gibs and it will be easier.

Looking at that, I would strongly suggest that you take ALL the slides apart and clean them up. You don't want grit, dirt, swarf or rust in there grinding away material as the slides move.

While oil may eventually wash it out, I wouldn't want to count on that.

And, I find that machines that have been left unused for years were neglected and not cleaned prior to being left unused, and usually have crud in the innards in bad places.

The headstock on that is likely safe, but the slides and probably some of the apron may have quite a bit of swarf build-up.

Lube...... way oil for the slides, manufacturer recommended oil for headstock, which is quite likely to be similar to a straight SAE 10 non-detergent. Quite often the apron uses way oil as well, some machines actually have a pump to apply it to the ways from the apron, but I have no idea on that one.

justanengineer
01-22-2012, 11:33 AM
Looking at that, I would strongly suggest that you take ALL the slides apart and clean them up. You don't want grit, dirt, swarf or rust in there grinding away material as the slides move.

While oil may eventually wash it out, I wouldn't want to count on that.

And, I find that machines that have been left unused for years were neglected and not cleaned prior to being left unused, and usually have crud in the innards in bad places.


+1 on this ^^^ Dont be lazy and/or skip anything.

Get a package of scotchbrite pads + WD40 and go to town. Make sure you get down into the "crap slot" in the bottom of all the dovetails, and pay attention to get all of the crap out of the drilled oil passages/galleries.

LHC
01-22-2012, 11:41 AM
That looks like quite a nice machine.... Did you get chucks etc with it?

Agree that the plate with crank must come off and the rest slides off other end. Loosen the gibs and it will be easier.

Looking at that, I would strongly suggest that you take ALL the slides apart and clean them up. You don't want grit, dirt, swarf or rust in there grinding away material as the slides move.

While oil may eventually wash it out, I wouldn't want to count on that.

And, I find that machines that have been left unused for years were neglected and not cleaned prior to being left unused, and usually have crud in the innards in bad places.

The headstock on that is likely safe, but the slides and probably some of the apron may have quite a bit of swarf build-up.

Lube...... way oil for the slides, manufacturer recommended oil for headstock, which is quite likely to be similar to a straight SAE 10 non-detergent. Quite often the apron uses way oil as well, some machines actually have a pump to apply it to the ways from the apron, but I have no idea on that one.

Thanks for the tips on the lubrication. I'm really having a hard time resisting the urge to tear this thing down and do a proper restoration but I am in the middle of that process with a little benchmaster mill that I picked up a few months back - don't want to dilute the time too much or I'll fall into my familiar trap of many projects all moving forward at a snail's pace.

Your comments on the crud/swarf in the slide though is sage advice and I'll certainly look at that as a minimum.

I got the three jaw and the 4 jaw chuck with it - Pratt Burnerd I believe.

I don't have a complete toolpost, or a spanner for the L-00 nut on the spindle. I did measure and draw up a spanner that I am going to pester an acquaintance of mine to cut out on their high definition plasma table (+/- 0.015").

No jacobs chuck for the tailpost, no tool bits, and most importantly - hardly any experience - haha. You'll be seeing a lot of me on here before I am making chips.....

This machine is built like a little tank from what I can tell. It has a little suds box and pump in the base of it, and the headstock and the bed are all one complete casting. The suds pump is 3 phase as I just discovered a couple of days ago when I took the layers of dirt, dust and solidified oil off of the nameplate.

I'll fire up a few more pics shortly when I can shrink them. I've wanted to learn how to use a lathe my whole life and being in electronics, I never really got exposed to them. Now's the time !

LHC
01-22-2012, 11:53 AM
Here's a few more pictures.

The ride home -
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn286/LHC_02/Raglan%20Lathe/P1020345b1.jpg

Rear view showing the suds box and pump-
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn286/LHC_02/Raglan%20Lathe/P1020368b.jpg

Nameplate on suds pump -
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn286/LHC_02/Raglan%20Lathe/P1020427b.jpg

J Tiers
01-22-2012, 11:58 AM
Good that you have chucks, because the taper adapters can be expensive......... much more so than threaded spindle accessories.


I've wanted to learn how to use a lathe my whole life and being in electronics, I never really got exposed to them. Now's the time !

Hah...... "we" seem to gravitate to it..... maybe it is dealing with the "un-seeable" ............ I have naturally not seen an electron ever, only what they do..... sometimes it's nice to see something directly.

LHC
01-23-2012, 02:57 PM
Back again with an update of sorts.

I got the topslide off - as directed, removed the 2 allen head screws holding the faceplate, then unwound the screw/faceplate assy out of the nut and then slid the topslide off towards the spindle.

Here's the underside of the topslide - easy to see why it was not moving off in the other direction !

http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn286/LHC_02/Raglan%20Lathe/P1020456a.jpg

Here's a couple of shots of the screw/faceplate.
How does one take this apart? Looks like the only way is to take the bolt off from the crank. I suspect there's a bearing of sorts inside as well. Should I be wary of things running everywhere on the floor if taken apart? The slight grinding feeling is in the crank on the faceplate. Might be some swarf/goo in the bearing.

http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn286/LHC_02/Raglan%20Lathe/P1020455a.jpg

http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn286/LHC_02/Raglan%20Lathe/P1020453a.jpg

And finally - the mount on the cross-slide. Pretty clean considering. More riddles for me to figure out though - what's the counterbore with the threaded hole that's been hiding under there all these years? Some other mount for a toolpost perhaps?

http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn286/LHC_02/Raglan%20Lathe/P1020458a.jpg

Thanks for all the tips and advice.

justanengineer
01-23-2012, 03:16 PM
Thanks for the tool porn. We all enjoy it, some of us even more so than the "other" variety. :D

Regarding the handle. remove the nut and it likely simply slides off. It may be a bit sticky due to being keyed onto the shaft, but a rubber mallet, oil, and some soft blows should persuade it. All of the machines I have ever dealt with have captive bearings, so likely yours does too, but I would keep it upright just in case. If it is a captive bearing, I would recommend simply soaking it in diesel for a day or two, followed by a good compressed air blast and repacking with fresh grease. Combine that with a good scrubbing on the ways, a quick cleaning of the screws, and maybe a quick polish of those handles and dials (quick, easy, and vastly improves the appearance/feel IMHO), and you should be ready for fun.

Sorry I cant help on the extra hole atm, but Im sure someone else will know or have a good idea at least.

RussZHC
01-23-2012, 07:20 PM
Love these refurbishments...I found it most useful if no manual is available (or difficult to find) since, if a complete disassembly is done, it can be difficult recalling all lubrication points, like the one at the rear of the dial/attachment plate and making yourself a little checklist to keep those points lubricated.
It could also be worthwhile in some instances to consider installing a little oiling cup, more because it protects those holes from swarf etc. than just containing a slightly larger oil volume.
There are also a couple of threads here somewhere about making those dials more legible (inking the marks etc.).

Keep the photos coming...I found it will help later to take as many as possible, even if it does not seem like something useful at the time...and also, take measurements related to those photos for anything that could be remotely useful [can't tell you the number of trips I've made back to the shop in the cold to get a measurement to match a photo I have...:o ]

sasquatch
01-23-2012, 07:38 PM
LHC, thanks for posting this .

You always seem to post good interesting pics of your'e project, and that is greatly appreciated.

LHC
01-23-2012, 09:14 PM
Thanks for the kind words fellows. I certainly appreciate these forums and the knowledge in them. About all I can give back to them at the moment is some detailed pictures of my learning process seeing as I am just a beginner. Hopefully it will help someone traveling the same path as me in the future.

Now then - more questions !

This Raglan has oil pots all over it - I am sure there are some I have not even come across yet. However, on the top-slide, there is this little chamfered hole. Why would this be a hole and not a oil pot? Maybe due to clearance? And it seems that it's centered right over the bearing (at least I think it's a bearing - I have not dismantled it yet). Would you drive grease, or oil into it as part of a regular maintenance program?
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn286/LHC_02/Raglan%20Lathe/P1020455aa.jpg

Then, on the cross slide - there is this weird little ball bearing thing that's spring loaded. I have seen these on things in passing years ago but took no notice of them. Same question - grease or oil, and in either case, what kind of gadget is used to press against it and squirt the oil into there?

http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn286/LHC_02/Raglan%20Lathe/P1020458aa.jpg

Thanks !

LHC
01-23-2012, 09:17 PM
[can't tell you the number of trips I've made back to the shop in the cold to get a measurement to match a photo I have...:o ]

heh - just came in from the garage - it's hovering at 0C (32F) out there at the moment...

sasquatch
01-23-2012, 09:38 PM
I believe the ball bearing thing you show on your'e cross slide is an oiler.
They are meant to close to keep crap out.

In your'e pic of the lathe in the truck bringing it home, you don't appear to have any snow?:eek:

LHC
01-23-2012, 09:47 PM
I believe the ball bearing thing you show on your'e cross slide is an oiler.
They are meant to close to keep crap out.

In your'e pic of the lathe in the truck bringing it home, you don't appear to have any snow?:eek:


There is now :mad:

justanengineer
01-23-2012, 09:51 PM
Sorry I cant comment on the hole above the bearing. Im thinking its not an oil port though. Normally you want to keep oil ports closed with either a gits cup or one of the ball bearing oil ports. Regardless, there is no need to chamfer the hole for either, and also would probably be a bad idea as it would tend to fill with swarf and crap quickly (especially with a big chamfer like that). If it is an oil port, its likely simply missing a gits cup, which sits down inside the chamfer.

Regarding the ball oiler, using a standard oil can that has a smaller non-flexible spout push the ball bearing down, "pop" the can bottom to squirt some oil in there, and remove.

Regarding lubing a machine in general, I would highly encourage finding a factory lube chart, laminating it, and following it every single time. Oil is cheap, and laziness will cost you.

J Tiers
01-23-2012, 10:04 PM
Eh, It looks like an oil port to me.... My Logan has them there also.

You are discovering the reasons I usually do a pretty complete 'take apart, clean, reassemble" job on "new used" equipment.

In some cases, I have to do more..... you may refer to the thread "Rivett report" for the worst one I have ever attempted. It is on-going, but has to be the filthiest and worst condition machine I have ever bought. If it were not basically such a super machine (if in good condition or after refurbished) I would have just laughed and got back in the truck. (the fact that only about 1800 of them were ever made didn't hurt)

Yours looks to be basically good, probably has a little wear, (but what doesn't?) and clearly is dirty. But a good serviceable machine, made well. It is probably nicer than what most of us other members have, actually.

Appearances are that when cleaned up, it will be a good worker.

RussZHC
01-23-2012, 10:47 PM
For me its also interesting to see how various makers approach identical or very similar "problems" in different fashions as well as the changes made over a few years of industrial design.

If roughly the same photos were taken of my Sheldon from the very late 1930s, one would not find a bearing where you suspect, and will likely find, one. What I found was just metal on metal and if lucky more of a bearing material (bronze say or perhaps just the cast iron in the case of the head stock). You may find (guessing) the bearing is more of a thrust bearing design with a cage to hold the balls and two flat, ground washers acting as running surfaces.
None of the oil ports on mine were free of junk, some completely blocked and only about half have an oil cup w lid, there were no ball oiling points.

A word of caution (also guessing), in taking that sub-assembly completely apart, when you take the nut off, if you try to remove the handle and if it does not want to move, double check that there is not a small taper pin still holding the handle in place. There may or may not be one and I think you would hate to break or bend something on the off chance the factory put one there. If you do end up looking for taper pins, there or elsewhere, I've found the best way is to clean the area and then a smear of dirty oil will help to discern the edges of pins.

+1 J Tiers, I've found his words and very good photos, great pics and lots of detail, very helpful. Very worthwhile reads.

Toxic
01-23-2012, 10:58 PM
[/QUOTE]

Then, on the cross slide - there is this weird little ball bearing thing that's spring loaded. I have seen these on things in passing years ago but took no notice of them. Same question - grease or oil, and in either case, what kind of gadget is used to press against it and squirt the oil into there?



Thanks ![/QUOTE]

Looks like it is going to be a decent lathe!..I use one of these..if this wasnt what you were asking about sorry..LOL

http://img18.imageshack.us/img18/7113/indexzq.th.jpg (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/18/indexzq.jpg/)

Uploaded with ImageShack.us (http://imageshack.us)

Black_Moons
01-23-2012, 11:23 PM
Don't remove slideways with the gibs installed. They will bind/jam :)

Its 10x easyer to remove (and install them) with the gibs removed. No fun trying to get a huge chunk of iron to unbind while supporting it, or hammer it on/off when it could just slide on/off.

LHC
01-24-2012, 08:47 AM
Don't remove slideways with the gibs installed. They will bind/jam :)

Its 10x easyer to remove (and install them) with the gibs removed. No fun trying to get a huge chunk of iron to unbind while supporting it, or hammer it on/off when it could just slide on/off.

Now you tell me ! Actually it came off rather easily, but did stick a little. I'll be following your advice on the other one though (cross slide) when the time comes. It's a bit longer and probably more prone to jamming if I don't remove the gib first.

Thanks.

Richard Wilson
01-25-2012, 10:51 AM
I've got one of the earlier Raglan Littlejohn Mk2s. Raglan were a very well built lathe, and expensive in their day. If you look at the extreme right hand end of the bed, and scrape the crap and paint off the top off the cross member between the front and rear of the bed, you will find the lathe serial number. We have a data base on the Yahoo Raglan group site to record known surviving machines, and given the serial number, might be able to put an approximate date on your machine. If it has 'chemically blacked' nuts for fasteners, that puts it towards the end of production, say 1968 - 1971, when Myford owned Raglan.

To remove the ball handle from the feedscrew you need to slacken the nut next to the handle, and gently tap the end of the screw. The handle is usually a stiffish fit on the shaft, and is stopped from turning by a woodruff key in the shaft. don't let the key fall on the floor! Raglans are oil lubricated, including the spindle bearings, and usually have those spring loaded ball fittings. all you need is a good pump action oil can with a fine metal nozzle, just to depress the ball while you squirt the oil in. it should be a straight 20W oil, but I use 30W lawnmower engine oil and haven't had any problems. That is certainly an oiling point in your photo, but I'm surprised it doesn't have a spring loaded ball fitting.
Dismantling the headstock has several traps for the unwary, so if you are thinking of doing that, give me a shout and I'll walk you through it. It isn't difficult once you know.

There is layshaft in the bottom of the headstock, and that has an oiler sticking out of the left hand end of the headstock down toards the bottom. Oil this regularly, as if the bearings go on this shaft, in order to replace them, the whole of the headstock has to be dismantled, and sometimes the bed has to lifted off the cabinet, as the layshaft only comes out downwards. Don't ask how I know, but its because a previous owner of my lathe used grease instead of oil and wrecked the layshaft bearings.

The right hand lever of the front of the headstock is for the backgears. Up is disengaged, down is engaged. The lever is locked in the 'up' or 'down' by twisting the knurled knob. when running with the backgear disenaged, make absolutly certain that the lever is firmly locked in the 'up' position. Its not unknown for one to drop down and engage backgear whilst running, and they are only cast iron gears.

A good Raglan, with the variable speed gear properly adjusted is a delight to use, and I hope you will be very happy with it.

richard

LHC
01-25-2012, 11:24 AM
I've got one of the earlier Raglan Littlejohn Mk2s. Raglan were a very well built lathe, and expensive in their day. If you look at the extreme right hand end of the bed, and scrape the crap and paint off the top off the cross member between the front and rear of the bed, you will find the lathe serial number. We have a data base on the Yahoo Raglan group site to record known surviving machines, and given the serial number, might be able to put an approximate date on your machine. If it has 'chemically blacked' nuts for fasteners, that puts it towards the end of production, say 1968 - 1971, when Myford owned Raglan.

To remove the ball handle from the feedscrew you need to slacken the nut next to the handle, and gently tap the end of the screw. The handle is usually a stiffish fit on the shaft, and is stopped from turning by a woodruff key in the shaft. don't let the key fall on the floor! Raglans are oil lubricated, including the spindle bearings, and usually have those spring loaded ball fittings. all you need is a good pump action oil can with a fine metal nozzle, just to depress the ball while you squirt the oil in. it should be a straight 20W oil, but I use 30W lawnmower engine oil and haven't had any problems. That is certainly an oiling point in your photo, but I'm surprised it doesn't have a spring loaded ball fitting.
Dismantling the headstock has several traps for the unwary, so if you are thinking of doing that, give me a shout and I'll walk you through it. It isn't difficult once you know.

There is layshaft in the bottom of the headstock, and that has an oiler sticking out of the left hand end of the headstock down toards the bottom. Oil this regularly, as if the bearings go on this shaft, in order to replace them, the whole of the headstock has to be dismantled, and sometimes the bed has to lifted off the cabinet, as the layshaft only comes out downwards. Don't ask how I know, but its because a previous owner of my lathe used grease instead of oil and wrecked the layshaft bearings.

The right hand lever of the front of the headstock is for the backgears. Up is disengaged, down is engaged. The lever is locked in the 'up' or 'down' by twisting the knurled knob. when running with the backgear disenaged, make absolutly certain that the lever is firmly locked in the 'up' position. Its not unknown for one to drop down and engage backgear whilst running, and they are only cast iron gears.

A good Raglan, with the variable speed gear properly adjusted is a delight to use, and I hope you will be very happy with it.

richard

Hello Richard - and thanks a million for passing along this valuable information. Hopefully you will not be sorry that you spoke up if I start to pepper you with questions in the not too distant future :)

Raglans seem to be extremely rare here in Canada and the US. The only other one that I have seen was one pop up on eBay a few months back when I started pestering the company where I bought it, to sell it to me

When I get back out to the garage I'll take a look for that serial number and log it into the yahoo raglan group database. There's so much dry black dust and goo on the bed, that I don't want to slide the tailstock until I have removed it.

The two gearbox levers on mine are very stiff - in fact the one that has "ABC" on it won't budge. The other one does not seem to be able to go up and engage in the holes either. Could it be that the gearbox has to be spooled up before the changes can be made to engage the gears? Mine won't be running for a while yet as I have ordered a VFD (inverter) and don't have it yet. The motor nameplate says 208/220 but I'll probably be able to get away with poking 230 into it. I don't relish the idea of dismantling that variable speed drive system on it at this stage, but I will probably have to eventually.

Do you have, or do you know where I might go to get some info on the removal of the apron and carriage? I looked up under there last night with a little light and don't like the state of affairs in there - there appears to be a lot of swarf and old congealed oil etc.

I'll shoot some more pics and upload them later, but thanks again for the valuable advice.

In general the lathe looks to have been used lightly, and then neglected for decades. However, it spent most of its life in a heated shop so I am hoping that a good cleaning and oiling and I'll be good to go. I'm certainly excited to have it after dreaming about owning a lathe for so long.

Richard Wilson
01-25-2012, 12:45 PM
I can tell you how the LJ mk 2 apron comes off, anf I don't think the 5" is much different. You need to remove the right hand leadscrew/feedscrew bearing, and pull out the leadscrew and feedscrew. Having done that, put some substanial timber packing in the swarf tray, under the apron, but not quite touching it. There should be 2 large allan cap screws in the top of the carriage, above the apron. Slacken them well off. The apron probably won't drop down at this point, its dowelled to the carriage, and mine was pretty tight. Tap down on the cap screws with a lead/rubber/copper hammer, and the apron should start to move down. Slack the cap screws off some more, and keep tapping till the apron and carriage part company. This can happen suddenly, and the apron is heavy, thats what the timber packing is for. once it comes down, it should just pull clear, and you can clean out the gunge of 50 years. I can't comment in detail on the innards, as the apron/carriage of the 5" was considerably improved over the LJ. You need to download the manual from the Raglan site. Ignore the Raglan 2 site, its got nothing useful on it, and is only used by spammers.

I suspect the gearbox levers are stiff on their shafts after years of no use. While the leadscrew and feedscew are off, take the cover off the gearbox and give everything a good oil spray. I use an aerosol motorbike chain grease on the gearbox, the change gears and the backgears in the headstock.

Adjusting the variable speed drive is a subject in itself. It just needs patience and time, but when you get it right, its worth it. When you get the thing fired up, if there is a rumbling noise from the variable speed, it usually means it needs adjusting. Don't try moving the speed control lever without the motor running, it will only move with the motor running. Spray chain grease is good for the variable speed thrust bearings as well, just don't get it on the belts.

Richard

LHC
01-25-2012, 02:57 PM
I can tell you how the LJ mk 2 apron comes off, anf I don't think the 5" is much different. You need to remove the right hand leadscrew/feedscrew bearing, and pull out the leadscrew and feedscrew. Having done that, put some substanial timber packing in the swarf tray, under the apron, but not quite touching it. There should be 2 large allan cap screws in the top of the carriage, above the apron. Slacken them well off. The apron probably won't drop down at this point, its dowelled to the carriage, and mine was pretty tight. Tap down on the cap screws with a lead/rubber/copper hammer, and the apron should start to move down. Slack the cap screws off some more, and keep tapping till the apron and carriage part company. This can happen suddenly, and the apron is heavy, thats what the timber packing is for. once it comes down, it should just pull clear, and you can clean out the gunge of 50 years. I can't comment in detail on the innards, as the apron/carriage of the 5" was considerably improved over the LJ. You need to download the manual from the Raglan site. Ignore the Raglan 2 site, its got nothing useful on it, and is only used by spammers.

I suspect the gearbox levers are stiff on their shafts after years of no use. While the leadscrew and feedscew are off, take the cover off the gearbox and give everything a good oil spray. I use an aerosol motorbike chain grease on the gearbox, the change gears and the backgears in the headstock.

Adjusting the variable speed drive is a subject in itself. It just needs patience and time, but when you get it right, its worth it. When you get the thing fired up, if there is a rumbling noise from the variable speed, it usually means it needs adjusting. Don't try moving the speed control lever without the motor running, it will only move with the motor running. Spray chain grease is good for the variable speed thrust bearings as well, just don't get it on the belts.

Richard

Richard -
The serial number of my unit is now revealed - #5198 and I have just added my record to the yahoo raglan group database.

http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn286/LHC_02/Raglan%20Lathe/P1020464a.jpg

And like you mentioned - it was hiding under a thick layer of black goo. Spirits made quick work of it though.

Your comments on the removal of the apron has answered another small item I was wondering about when looking over the carriage the other night. It appears that the 2 large cap screws you refer to are under the plastic inserts as seen in this shot -

http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn286/LHC_02/Raglan%20Lathe/P1020465a.jpg

I assume that I will just pop these off but will wait until I am ready to have at it with the apron.

A quick shot under the apron reveals that there is indeed a lot of old hardened oil etc. but surprisingly there seems to be a gear in there that's very shiny and clean looking - at least the flash of the camera made it look that way. It looked a lot worse when I was peering in there yesterday (probably due to looking into a dark place with poor lighting).

http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn286/LHC_02/Raglan%20Lathe/P1020471a.jpg

This shot of the front of the gearbox shows black oxide fasteners so perhaps I have a Myford Raglan.

http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn286/LHC_02/Raglan%20Lathe/P1020473a.jpg

Once again - thanks very much for your insight. I have read somewhere that the headstock and bed casting is identical to the Little John model, but as you say, the carriage was changed for the "5" model.

One thing that just came to mind on the carriage removal. When you remove the lead and feed screws via the bearing block on the right side of the bed casting - are there any special alignment issues to deal with when they are placed back as far as the procedure to follow?

Richard Wilson
01-25-2012, 04:01 PM
hi
The headstock of an LJ is a different shape to that on a 5", so no. the head/bed castings are not the same. The internals however are virtually identical, may even be identical.

Most things on a Raglan are dowelled together, and I seem to remember that the leadscrew/feedscrew bearing is, so no alignment issue when you put it back together.

That nice shiny gear can get a lot of wear, although yours doesn't look too bad. It sits in an open topped housing that fills up with swarf and other gunge, and keeps the gear shiny by wearing it away!
It slides on the feedshaft, and is driven by an internal key. Problem is, that key is integral with the gear, thats right, a bore with a key sticking into it, and all cut from the solid! not the easiest thing in the world to make, although at least one member of the Raglan group in the UK has done it.

Richard

LHC
01-30-2012, 07:00 PM
Gents -
I have another thread going on the swivel mount for the topslide and thought I'd mention it here for those that didn't catch it or are interested.

Basically I found the first "non stock" modification and have been soliciting feedback on how to deal with it.

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?p=736693&posted=1#post736693