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sasquatch
01-22-2012, 04:29 PM
Maybe this has been posted here before but i wasn't aware of it untill today.

My daughter in law works for the company that is drilling the mountain to install this clock by Danny Hillis, and she showed me a company video of it today.

http://longnow.org/clock/

Amazing piece of work.

tdkkart
01-22-2012, 05:04 PM
Seen these before, but I fail to see the point?? Much the same as long distance space exploration, lots of resources expended that could be put to better uses, IMO.

justanengineer
01-22-2012, 05:29 PM
Ahhh....the power of "non-profits" at work. In this instance though, I see this as nothing but an attempt on the part of a few wealthy individuals to be remembered throughout history. This is purely a novelty at best. Over the centuries the "inventors" will long be forgotten, parts stolen, and general neglect will ruin the mechanism....assuming that someone doesnt purchase the property in the meantime and scrap it, and EPA doesnt decide its harmful to the environment.

Why is it that if I drop an engine block in a lake to create the anchor for a lfoating dock its pollution, yet an idea such as this is considered "novel?"

sasquatch
01-22-2012, 05:36 PM
tdkkart and justanengineer,, i heartily agree.

Wonder what the total cost would be?:rolleyes:

Forrest Addy
01-22-2012, 06:19 PM
Whata bunch of reactionaries and nay-sayers. The reason to build a clock explore space, and conduct other expensive and apparently pointless things is because they tend to being beneficial unintended consequences.

Besides, confine human activity to stuff deemed suitable by stuffed shirts, censors, zelonts of all description, and plain every day squares and party poopers and we'll have the Dark Age all over again where a n individual can't even admire a sunset without fear of censure from his neighbors.

If you have no sense of adventure or wonder in your parched souls dont inflict your CYA rationalizations "pointless" "too expensive" "let someone else do it" and dumbest of all "my tax dollars" on the exciting folks willing to take a chance on the non-immidiately profitable.

I think that clock is a hell of an idea. The first practical experiment in human activity whose life is measured in geologic age. Hell, the Pyrimids are no more than piles of stone and after a mere 3000 years they are crumbling.

Tel
01-22-2012, 06:33 PM
Don't think I'll get one - it would be too easy to lose the key with that long between windings.

aboard_epsilon
01-22-2012, 07:20 PM
I hear the Americans are pushing to abolish the leap second ...and do away with Greenwich as the centre of world time .

all the best.markj

Forrest Addy
01-22-2012, 08:01 PM
We got our share of throw out the baby with the bathwater morons - MORE than our share.

darryl
01-23-2012, 01:52 AM
This clock has already been a benefit to me- seeing this topic again has reminded me to reset my alarm:)

lazlo
01-23-2012, 08:31 AM
Ahhh....the power of "non-profits" at work. In this instance though, I see this as nothing but an attempt on the part of a few wealthy individuals to be remembered throughout history.

Pretty much. Danny Hillis conceived the idea and designed the first prototype, but he's been eclipsed by Jeff Bezos -- the Amazon founder who funded it:

http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2011/06/10000-year-clock/all/1

Bezos is also selling franchises -- there's another clock being built overseas.

justanengineer
01-23-2012, 10:23 AM
Pretty much. Danny Hillis conceived the idea and designed the first prototype, but he's been eclipsed by Jeff Bezos -- the Amazon founder who funded it:
.

Yes, but dont think that Bezos is the only wealthy individual with a big ego involved. Danny Hillis is far from someone dedicated to helping further science or humanity purely to advance it, and this project is simply yet more proof of it.

Personally, I have nothing against deep space exploration, ridiculous research, or other "scientific" endeavors that may eventually help someone. What I am against however is the stroking of egos purely for ego's sake (unless someone truly needs it (ie. bad/depressing day flattery/cheering)), and the abuse of something like this being a "non profit." You can bet that if one of us added an exquisite clock to our property the grubberment would be holding out their hand rather quickly. Moreover, you can bet that if those with wealth and fame werent associated with this project, there would be relatively little notoriety. That being said, I do thoroughly enjoy the history of science and technology. Had this been a clock constructed 2000 years ago, I would wholeheartedly advocate its protection...but it wasnt (though likely could have been), and frankly I dont see how this makes any contribution to science or technology.

2ManyHobbies
01-23-2012, 01:53 PM
Had this been a clock constructed 2000 years ago, I would wholeheartedly advocate its protection...but it wasnt (though likely could have been), and frankly I dont see how this makes any contribution to science or technology.
Make a machine that will still successfully perform its intended function 100 years from now with minimal upkeep and maintenance. Easy enough you say? Now envision a machine that will function 1000 years from now. Everything we've got is disposable and replaceable. That kind of longevity and view of function just isn't there in most of our society.

Spin Doctor
01-23-2012, 06:29 PM
While I have my doubts about just how long this machine will run much less survive it makes a lot more sense than the "art" done by Cristos if I have the name right.

Gunney
01-23-2012, 07:16 PM
This thread reminds me of a common reaction I get when I tell someone about some of my hobbies (amateur astronomy, model engine building, etc.). The most common reaction I get is "what the hell is the point of that?" Hmmm.