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elginrunner
01-23-2012, 11:47 PM
Just how the heck did you get that thing up on the cast iron legs?!?


I have a 4003 on order and am trying to get things organized as how to get it set up. It will be located in an room with a tiled concrete floor. I had planed on getting it off the trailer with a tractor with front end loader onto furniture movers to get it through the 36" wide door. How did you get it up on the anchored cabinet/legs?

Any help will be greatly appreciated

Thanks
Brock in AR

daved20319
01-23-2012, 11:55 PM
But I used an ordinary engine hoist on my old 12x24. Would have been easier if I'd had an extra pair of hands, but I managed. Hope that helps.

Dave

mechanicalmagic
01-24-2012, 12:20 AM
Folding HF shop crane. Now I use the crane to move the lathe away from the wall.

rock_breaker
01-24-2012, 12:20 AM
Your method is how I got my Grizzly 9249 in the shop. I used hydraulic jacks and 2" X 4" and 4" X 4" to get it to top of bench. I learned not to be chincy with the cribbing. Ultimately got it high enough to roll across a plank onto the bench.

Scared the s _ _ _ (stuffing) out of my nephew ( an Army helicopter pilot on leave after a tour in Iraq) Knowing his temperment I wonder if he has ever tried to fly a chopper upside down or something similar.

The guy I bought the lathe from had made two A-frames that he put on either side of the machines he needed to move, the top bars were pipes that would slide inside one-another. He made the A-frmes about 8 feet high and used a 1 ton chain hoist to raise the machinery then lowered it onto a heavy duty dolly (like a furnature mover) to roll the machines to their new location. Really worked good.

Ray

rolland
01-24-2012, 12:26 AM
I mounted the lathe on the cabinet/stand outside and bolted two 2x8 under the cabinet for skids long ways. Then using pipe rollers moved it in the shop. Its was a little top heavy but with help inched it along.

gcude
01-24-2012, 12:52 AM
Your method is how I got my Grizzly 9249 in the shop. I used hydraulic jacks and 2" X 4" and 4" X 4" to get it to top of bench. I learned not to be chincy with the cribbing. Ultimately got it high enough to roll across a plank onto the bench.

Scared the s _ _ _ (stuffing) out of my nephew ( an Army helicopter pilot on leave after a tour in Iraq) Knowing his temperment I wonder if he has ever tried to fly a chopper upside down or something similar.

The guy I bought the lathe from had made two A-frames that he put on either side of the machines he needed to move, the top bars were pipes that would slide inside one-another. He made the A-frmes about 8 feet high and used a 1 ton chain hoist to raise the machinery then lowered it onto a heavy duty dolly (like a furnature mover) to roll the machines to their new location. Really worked good.

Ray

Your nephew would really get excited over this rig. :eek: Brains for safety appear to be optional ....

http://i330.photobucket.com/albums/l416/garycude/DSC00517.jpg

elginrunner
01-24-2012, 09:23 AM
I had thought of using an engine hoist or "cherry picker" as they are referred to. I don't have one or know of anyone that does. I suppose I am going to build a gantry from lumber, but not like the one above.

thanks for all the replys.

Brock

SGW
01-24-2012, 10:01 AM
A couple of ideas:

If you have enough headroom, a couple sections of pipe scaffolding with a big beam across the top makes a good frame to hang a hoist from.

If the ceiling joists are exposed in the room, a loop of chain (make sure it's strong enough to take the load!) can be attached near the top edge of two adjacent joists with through-bolts to make something to hang a hoist from.

tdkkart
01-24-2012, 10:10 AM
I had thought of using an engine hoist or "cherry picker" as they are referred to. I don't have one or know of anyone that does. I suppose I am going to build a gantry from lumber, but not like the one above.
thanks for all the replys.Brock


Cheap, handy as heck, and don't take up alot of space:
http://www.harborfreight.com/1-ton-capacity-foldable-shop-crane-93840.html
Buy it, use it, sell it on Craigslist, if you buy with a 20% off coupon you might make a few $$$.

chevy3755
01-24-2012, 10:18 AM
cherry picker.....

Punkinhead
01-24-2012, 11:17 AM
I had thought of using an engine hoist or "cherry picker" as they are referred to. I don't have one or know of anyone that does.
Rent one. Any tool rental place should have one and it'll be cheaper than lumber.

daved20319
01-24-2012, 11:22 AM
I had thought of using an engine hoist or "cherry picker" as they are referred to. I don't have one or know of anyone that does. I suppose I am going to build a gantry from lumber, but not like the one above.

thanks for all the replys.

Brock

Must be a rental yard around, rent is a cheap cost vs. a damaged machine or body. Later.

Dave

Seastar
01-24-2012, 12:07 PM
I bought a HF engine hoist several years ago to install my first large lathe and now use it at least twice a year to move somthing.
Last thing I lifted was my small airplane to change a tire - the airplane has lift rings built in.
Very useful tool!
Bill

uncle pete
01-24-2012, 01:45 PM
Maybe it's advice that isn't needed because it all depends on your experience level. But,

I've been lifting some heavy to the average person objects off and on for over 30 years in various jobs. And it doesn't get done like most of the fools do it on Gold Rush Alaska.

Lifting anything of value like this is no place to be in a rush. There's set lifting points for lathes, And you can damage feed rods and leadscrews if you do it wrong. Lathes also aren't well balanced compared to most other items. They like to roll over if the lifting points and center of gravity are wrong. Bad enough to destroy the equipment, But personal injuries or worse would really ruin your day. Think things thru very well, Make a point of not going cheap or light duty on any shackels, chains, straps, or slings. And try and visulise any and all problems that could possibly happen. And again, Slow down and take your time. Lifting anything over a few hundred pounds is a bit more complicated than the average person thinks. Done right, It's easy. Done wrong? It's a totall disaster.

Pete

The Artful Bodger
01-24-2012, 02:18 PM
I made a strong point over the workshop doorway, where the building is strongest. I first fitted 4"x4" extended feet to the base then using a chain block raised the lathe off my vehicle and onto the base.

The extended feet gave me plenty of scope for putting rollers under. When the lathe was in position I jacked up each end and unscrewed that foot and lowered the machine to the floor. The procedure went fairly quickly and without any stress.

Engine lifts are good when used for their intended purpose but if you cant get the feet under the bench it becomes very difficult to do anything safely. I am suprised we do not hear of lathes and other bench machines being dumped on the floor through engine lift tip ups.

Ron of Va
01-24-2012, 03:23 PM
http://www.hunt101.com/data/500/medium/LiftingLathe.jpg

tlfamm
01-24-2012, 03:40 PM
Ron - what is the source of the spreader-bar on your rig?


I've got the same lathe, and also used an engine hoist - but without a spreader I was nervous about the right-hand sling sliding inward, so it was attached to a web in the bed casting. That produces a tilt toward the headstock during the left - manageable, but not ideal.


Edit: after looking at your rig and checking my lathe, the previous rationale doesn't hold water: your right-hand sling is restrained by the right-hand base of the bed. Maybe I was compensating for a too-short sling - or maybe I was naively following the rigging instructions in the owner's manual. Memory fails ...

ironnut
01-24-2012, 03:42 PM
Fed Ex used a fork lift to shove the lathe and the stands into the back of the wife's horse trailer. Once I got it home I used the backhoe with some homemade forks made of 6" channel iron to get it out of the horse trailer. There was a bunch of fiddling around and jockeying to get the lathe onto the forks and then out of the horse trailer.

I could have used the back hoe to lift the lathe and place it on the stands, but it was threatening rain. So I set the pallet, that the lathe was in, on blocks so I could use a hand pallet jack to position it. Then I removed the fancy wooden box that covered the pallet and constructed a gantry crane out of pipe, channel iron, and a length of 4 inch "I" beam above the lathe. I used some nylon lifting straps as rigging. One was wrapped around the bed near the head stock. Make sure that you have the strap between the lead screw, carriage feed and power switch rods and the bed to avoid bending the 3 shafts. The other strap was threaded through the casting holes in the bed on the tail stock end. I used a chain come-along to lift the the lathe off of the pallet and sufficiently high enough to clear the cast iron stands. I pushed those under it and lowered the lathe to rest on the stands.

Once I got everything tightened down. I drilled and tapped 4 1/2-13 holes, 2 on each of the stands, front and back. I attached a length of 1 1/2 x 1 1/2 by 1/4 inch angle iron on the back side of the stands and a piece 1" heavy pipe with some tabs on the front side of the stands at a height that allowed a pallet jack to pass beneath the pipe and angle iron. The tabs were needed to deal with the architectural slope back aspect of the stands in the front area. The pipe and angle iron allowed me to use the pallet jack to pick the lathe up, stands and all and move it into my rather cramped shop area inside of my equipment shed.

I did not install the sheet metal parts that go between the two stands. I am in the process of building a set of drawers on casters, that fits between the stands for tooling storage, chucks, steady rests, etc.

I think the cherry picker set-up, carefully positioned, might be a better way to go, but lacking that and having a large pile of scrap iron I opted for the long trip around the barn method. No animals were hurt in the process although the mice probably had side aches from watching my efforts and ruminations.

I might have some pictures of all that nonsense.

gordon

http://i1121.photobucket.com/albums/l515/FEnut/GantryNlatheSmall.jpg

http://i1121.photobucket.com/albums/l515/FEnut/latheOnStandSmall.jpg

Ron of Va
01-24-2012, 04:42 PM
Ron - what is the source of the spreader-bar on your rig?
...
It came with the engine hoist. I've had it for 2-1/2 years. I saw it at Sams Club for $129. I jumped on it like a big dog on a big tree.:D

rock_breaker
01-24-2012, 07:49 PM
Yes my nephew would get excited !!

What is the weight of that engine ?? My lathe is about 1100 pounds so I don't think I would trust the A-frame in the picture.

My shop is a former residence which makes me give serious consideration to overhead hoists, think I will try an A-frame arangement when movements are necessary.:)

Ray

byrdman
01-24-2012, 10:11 PM
Cheap, handy as heck, and don't take up alot of space:
http://www.harborfreight.com/1-ton-capacity-foldable-shop-crane-93840.html
Buy it, use it, sell it on Craigslist, if you buy with a 20% off coupon you might make a few $$$.

Wow, this thread could have been written by me! I just bought a 4003 and that exact engine hoist to move it. Worked great.

Forrest Addy
01-25-2012, 12:50 AM
Safety rant for noobs about hoisting and moving weights.

150 years ago there were stories of plains Indians (I know, I know) who tried to stop 25 MPH locomotives by roping them from horseback. They had no visceral concept of mass and motion.

Moving a delicate unhandy weight like a bench lathe is merely a problem. If the problem is properly solved the lathe will finish in its intended location, undamaged, and the lifiting crew have expended nothing more than a little sweat. You can imagine the thousand things that could go wrong including mashed fingers, a dropped load. Broken bones or loss of life are not impossible.

If you have never conducted a heavy lift before, consider the operation as a series of small steps that when followed in sequence conludes with a successful lift.

Engine hoist. Very handy and versatle. Not a bridge crane but cheap and effects if worked within its limits. Examine the lathe suspended by the yellow slings in the photo in post #16. It's been done right and the way it was done conveys lessons:

The two yellow slings are passed between the lead screw and shafting and the manchine's bed. That way the tension on the slings won't bend anything important.

Also note how the slings were routed under th bed and back around the pedestals. The spread sling bights cannot slide in because the pedestals interfere. Also note the tailstock and carriage are cranked to balance the weight of the headstock. If it was not possible to tuck the sling round someting, "prevernters" (ropes around the ends of the machine and tied to each sling leg) should be used to keep them from sliding inwards along the bed.

What can't be seen is the slings' eyes over the hook of the hoist. I assume the hook is "moused" that is tied off from bill to nape with twine so the sling eyes cannot slip out if the load is momentariely relieved for some reason.

The slings are stout factory made lifitng equipment load rated and in good condition.

The only thing I don't see is "chafing gear", stout padding to prevent sharp machine corners from damaging the sling.

Also note how the load center of gravity is located a bit inside the load wheels of the hoist. The hoist will not flip over frontwards should it swing out a ways.

See how the floor is clean and clear of obstructions and tripping hazards. In the background the landing site is clear of interferances.

The load may be lifted as high as needed for fitting the bench or pedestals.

Presumably the crane wheels were checked for operation and lubricated before the lift and the hoist exercised for full travel making sure its cylinder will fully extend without becoming airbound.

That leads us to the crew. The operation was rehearsed and each step in the move walked through so each crew member knows his job, all interferences, pinch points, obstacles considered and a strategy worked out to cope with them.

Before the lift there was a short safety meeting. This serves two puposes: it defines the safety issues for ths particular operation and unifies the members into a team each with a task and a respinsibility. In the usual lift this meeting takes about 30 seconds but if the members are strangers and inexperienced they need to be brought in to the picture. Most importantly it's explained if anyone hollers "Stop!" everyone stops and holds his position until the problem is identified and cleared.

No beer until the job is done. A beer may not impede a driver but a driver is performig a familiar task on his own. A lifting team member will be doing the unfamiliar and HAS to work cooperatively. "Hold my beer and watch this" might be a great punch-line but it has often lead to disaster in the real world.

I've run impromptu work crews all my life and I've determined to my dismay there are no more accident prone people than helpful but inexperienced friends and neighbors moving heavy weights.

There can only be one boss.

One last thing. Before you move the load a distant from it's receiving point to its final location. lower the load so it rests on the hoist's frame on carpet or something high friction so it won't slip. Leave a little tension on the hoist. That way the load won't swing to every little hitch or bump on its way. Make the lift the final evolution.

Plan your work, work your plan. When you do people will wonder why you were so fussy but you'll know. You have a job done, a full crew digging cheerfully into the pizza and opening beer. Your fuss and feathers are the reason the crew isn't standing around shocked and white faced as the ambulence pulls away.

tdkkart
01-25-2012, 01:43 AM
Don't neglect checking the equipment's manual, which will often have detailed and specific instructions on the rigging for a move. The manual for my recently acquired Clausing lathe had very good instructions on how to move it, and following them made moving it very painless.